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61 - 70 of 84 results for: CARDCOURSES::identity ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HUMBIO 149: Psychological and Educational Resilience Among Children and Youth (EDUC 256)

Theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to the psychological and educational resilience of children and adolescents. Overview of the resilience framework, including current terminology and conceptual and measurement issues. Adaptive systems that enable some children to achieve successful adaptation despite high levels of adversity exposure. How resilience can be studied across multiple levels of analysis, ranging from cell to society. Individual, family, school, and community risk and protective factors that influence children's development and adaptation. Intervention programs designed to foster resilient adaptation in disadvantaged children's populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Padilla, A. (PI)

HUMRTS 104: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104, FEMGEN 94H, SOC 186)

One in every five Americans has some kind of disability according to the Census Bureau, making this group the largest minority in America. Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. Disability is an elusive, complex and fluid concept that encompasses a range of bodily, cognitive and sensory differences and abilities. It is produced as much by environmental and social factors as it is by bodily functions and pathology. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability i more »
One in every five Americans has some kind of disability according to the Census Bureau, making this group the largest minority in America. Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. Disability is an elusive, complex and fluid concept that encompasses a range of bodily, cognitive and sensory differences and abilities. It is produced as much by environmental and social factors as it is by bodily functions and pathology. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, anti-discrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)

INTNLREL 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kelly, K. (PI)

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 146J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (ANTHRO 146J, CSRE 146J, MUSIC 246J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MUSIC 246J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (ANTHRO 146J, CSRE 146J, MUSIC 146J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYC 86Q: Psychology of Xenophobia

What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrati more »
What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrating Islamic spirituality into therapy as a means of addressing the under utilization of mental health services in Muslim populations. A combination of stimulating group discussions, talks by guest speakers, and field trips to community partners will provide students with different perspectives and a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYCH 155: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 256: Race at Work

In this practicum, students will examine how race works in a variety of institutional spaces by participating in community partnerships relevant to criminal justice, education, economic development, or health. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite for undergraduates: Psych 1, Psych 70, and one of the following: Psych 150, Psych 180, Psych 298, Psych 103, Psych 135, Psych 30N, or Psych 138.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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