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11 - 20 of 67 results for: CARDCOURSES::identity ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CHILATST 177B: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177F, EDUC 177B)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Padilla, A. (PI)

CHILATST 180E: Introduction to Chicanx/Latinx Studies (CSRE 180E, EDUC 179E)

This course draws on intersectional and interdisciplinary approaches to introduce students to the range of issues, experiences, and methodologies that form the foundation of Latina/o/x studies. By considering the relationship between the creation of "Latinx" and "American" identities, students will critically reconsider the borders that constitute the U.S. as a political and cultural formation. The course balances depth and breadth in its study of the variety of perspectives and experiences that come to be associated with U.S. Latinxs. Thus, we will analyze the histories of predominant U.S. Latinx sub-groups, such as Mexicans/Chicanxs and Puerto Ricans, while also incorporating considerations of the ways in which broader populations with ties to Central America, South America, and the Caribbean play crucial roles in constituting U.S. Latinx identities. Topics include the U.S./Mexico border and the borderlands; (im)migration and diaspora; literary and cultural traditions; music and expr more »
This course draws on intersectional and interdisciplinary approaches to introduce students to the range of issues, experiences, and methodologies that form the foundation of Latina/o/x studies. By considering the relationship between the creation of "Latinx" and "American" identities, students will critically reconsider the borders that constitute the U.S. as a political and cultural formation. The course balances depth and breadth in its study of the variety of perspectives and experiences that come to be associated with U.S. Latinxs. Thus, we will analyze the histories of predominant U.S. Latinx sub-groups, such as Mexicans/Chicanxs and Puerto Ricans, while also incorporating considerations of the ways in which broader populations with ties to Central America, South America, and the Caribbean play crucial roles in constituting U.S. Latinx identities. Topics include the U.S./Mexico border and the borderlands; (im)migration and diaspora; literary and cultural traditions; music and expressive practices; labor and structural inequality; social movements; Latinx urbanism; gender and sexuality; political and economic shifts; and inter- and intra-group relations. Sources include a range of social science and humanities scholarship. This course will meet at Sequoia High School. Transportation will be provided.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul
Instructors: Rosa, J. (PI)

CHILATST 201B: The Undocumented Migration Project Exhibition at Stanford (CSRE 201B)

Are you an artist seeking a greater purpose for you art? Would you like to gain a sense of history and best practices for engaging your community in creative work? nnHuman Rights policy experts and activists, artists and scholars will participate in this (online via Zoom.us) student & community course on contemporary immigration policy and human rights issues.The course is structured around the ideas of art, activism and scholarship as they intersect with the subject of migration. Often considered distinct fields, we will explore the ways they merge together, and engage in dialogue with an array of guests from a multitude of backgrounds.nn In addition to learning about the Hostile Terrain94 project through tagging the identities of lives of those lost along the Sonoran desert and considering the U.S. policy of prevention through deterrence to crossing the U.S. Mexican Border, this class will explore art making with paper as the primary media. Paper with its material qualities can provi more »
Are you an artist seeking a greater purpose for you art? Would you like to gain a sense of history and best practices for engaging your community in creative work? nnHuman Rights policy experts and activists, artists and scholars will participate in this (online via Zoom.us) student & community course on contemporary immigration policy and human rights issues.The course is structured around the ideas of art, activism and scholarship as they intersect with the subject of migration. Often considered distinct fields, we will explore the ways they merge together, and engage in dialogue with an array of guests from a multitude of backgrounds.nn In addition to learning about the Hostile Terrain94 project through tagging the identities of lives of those lost along the Sonoran desert and considering the U.S. policy of prevention through deterrence to crossing the U.S. Mexican Border, this class will explore art making with paper as the primary media. Paper with its material qualities can provide diverse and accessible entryways into the processes of inclusion, recordation, and mass participation. Through the interconnecting of the practical task of filling information onto toe tags to create the exhibition at the Anderson Collection, which documents the human remains of migrants identified for the exhibition (Fall 2020) with creating new objects in paper, the projects in this course will discover and recover identity through articulations of identity in paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CSRE 18: Antiracism and Health Equity: A project-based community service course

This class will examine the structural racialized bias in medicine, biomedical research and health care delivery by using short form media to address the dismantling of systemic racist practices. In understanding that inequity is a feature and not a flaw of health status and health care delivery in the United States, students will design and deliver creative, serviceable solutions for community partner-generated problems/issues. This course is designed for human biology students but, all majors are welcome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Shipp, S. (PI)

CSRE 142C: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Kelly, K. (PI)

CSRE 146A: Designing Research for Social Justice: Writing a Community-Based Research Proposal (URBANST 123)

This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges invol more »
This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges involved. By the end of the course, students should have a complete research proposal that can be used to apply for a number of summer funding opportunities including the Chappell Lougee Scholarship, the Community-Based Research Fellowship, Cardinal Quarter fellowships, and Major Grants. Please note that completion of the course does not guarantee funding-- rather, the course supports you in learning how to write a strong community-engaged research proposal that you can use to apply to any number of fellowships). This course is also useful for students in any academic year who are interested in pursuing community-engaged theses or capstone projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Tien, J. (PI)

CSRE 146B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (URBANST 123B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 150B: Race and Crime Practicum (PSYCH 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in PSYCH 150 Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. Prerequisite: PSYCH 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4

CSRE 152B: Black Music Revealed: Black composers, performers, and themes from the 18th century to the present (MUSIC 152B)

Online seminar on the achievements of Black composers and performers in ragtime, jazz, and classical music, from Chevalier de Saint-Georges, whose music influenced Mozart, and George Bridgetower, for whom Beethoven composed his "Kreutzer" Sonata, to Anthony Davis's opera "The Central Park Five". Students will examine issues of cultural borrowing in operas by Mozart and Verdi, and shows like Showboat and Porgy and Bess. Guest speakers will include composers and performers. Students will work together in groups to produce materials on course topics in coordination with the African American Museum & Library at Oakland. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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