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1 - 10 of 28 results for: CARDCOURSES::humanrights ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (DANCE 197, TAPS 197)

This class uses the lens of performance, and particularly dance, to explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration and its cultural dimensions. Class readings and discussions foreground the legal and social contexts surrounding prisons in the U.S., Particular attention will be paid to the nexus of art, community, and social action, and how dance might be used to study the performing arts effects on self-construction, perception, experiences of embodiment, and social control for incarcerated teenagers. The class includes guest speakers who bring important perspectives on criminal justice including returned citizens, a juvenile justice attorney, a restorative conferencing facilitator and a dancer who teaches women in prison to be their own dance instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

ANTHRO 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (CSRE 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as more »
As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Hayat, M. (PI)

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CS 184: Bridging Policy and Tech Through Design (PUBLPOL 170)

This project-based course aims to bring together students from computer science and the social sciences to work with external partner organizations at the nexus of digital technology and public policy. Students will collaborate in interdisciplinary teams on a problem with a partner organization. Along with the guidance of faculty mentors and the teaching staff, students will produce a set of deliverables ranging from policy memos and white papers to data visualizations and software. Possible projects suggested by partner organizations will be presented at an information session on Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:30 pm in Gates 415 - RSVP http://bit.ly/InfoCS184. Following the info session, a course application will open for teams to be selected before the start of Spring Quarter. Students may apply to a project with a partner organization or with a pre-formed team and their own idea to be reviewed for approval by the course staff. Applications close March 20 and successful applicants will be n more »
This project-based course aims to bring together students from computer science and the social sciences to work with external partner organizations at the nexus of digital technology and public policy. Students will collaborate in interdisciplinary teams on a problem with a partner organization. Along with the guidance of faculty mentors and the teaching staff, students will produce a set of deliverables ranging from policy memos and white papers to data visualizations and software. Possible projects suggested by partner organizations will be presented at an information session on Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:30 pm in Gates 415 - RSVP http://bit.ly/InfoCS184. Following the info session, a course application will open for teams to be selected before the start of Spring Quarter. Students may apply to a project with a partner organization or with a pre-formed team and their own idea to be reviewed for approval by the course staff. Applications close March 20 and successful applicants will be notified by Tuesday, March 24th. The course meets twice a week: Once with all students taking the course and a second time with the project-based team mentors. The time below is for the cross-team meetings, as the team meetings will be scheduled according to member availability. Prerequisites: Appropriate preparation depends on the nature of the project proposed, and will be verified by the teaching staff based on your application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Ullman, J. (PI)

CSRE 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (ANTHRO 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as more »
As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Hayat, M. (PI)

DANCE 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, TAPS 197)

This class uses the lens of performance, and particularly dance, to explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration and its cultural dimensions. Class readings and discussions foreground the legal and social contexts surrounding prisons in the U.S., Particular attention will be paid to the nexus of art, community, and social action, and how dance might be used to study the performing arts effects on self-construction, perception, experiences of embodiment, and social control for incarcerated teenagers. The class includes guest speakers who bring important perspectives on criminal justice including returned citizens, a juvenile justice attorney, a restorative conferencing facilitator and a dancer who teaches women in prison to be their own dance instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

EDUC 100A: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, the theme is "Ten Careers in Education in Ten Weeks." Each week will feature a speaker from a different sector in education including school administration, arts education, information technology, special education, international development, student affairs, education consulting, and education policy. In the spring, the seminar will focus on Human Rights Education. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice. Notes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave. The seminar is open to all students at Stanford with first-priority given to pre-assign residents of EAST House followed by other residents of EAST and all other undergraduates. Graduate students are allowed to enroll on a space-available basis. Visitors/auditors are not allowed. The seminar is required for all pre-assigned residents of EAST House and is repeatable for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (HISTORY 6W, HUMRTS 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

FEMGEN 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (HISTORY 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)
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