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1 - 10 of 17 results for: CARDCOURSES::humanrights ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CSRE 150B: Race and Crime Practicum (PSYCH 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in PSYCH 150 Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. Prerequisite: PSYCH 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4

FEMGEN 6W: Community-Engaged Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking - Part I (HISTORY 6W, HUMRTS 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

FEMGEN 7W: Community-Engaged Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking - Part II (HISTORY 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, FEMGEN 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Required weekly 50-min. discussion section, time TBD. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 6W: Community-Engaged Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking - Part I (FEMGEN 6W, HUMRTS 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Community-Engaged Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking - Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HUMRTS 108: Advanced Spanish Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the Border

This community engaged learning workshop is open only to students who are concurrently enrolled in SPANLANG 108SL. Through the HUMRTS 108 units, students will have the opportunity to apply their advanced Spanish language skills and knowledge of the US immigration detention system from the class as volunteers with immigrant rights advocacy organizations. Students will be trained to staff a hotline to help monitor detention conditions in more than 200 immigrant prisons, report abuse, expose dehumanizing conditions, and request support on behalf of detainees and their loved ones. Human rights lawyer Penelope Van Tuyl will guest lecture to give students legal context, and we will have the visits as well of other specialists in US-Central American international relations, mental health, media, and art activism. We will also be joined by migrants and refugees who will share their stories in US detention and seeking asylum. nn nnThis course requires permission from the instructor to enroll. Please email instructor Vivian Brates vbrates@stanford.edu to get a link to the appropriate web form. nnnPlease note that this course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER
Instructors: Brates, V. (PI)

MED 232: Global Health: Scaling Health Technology Innovations in Low Resource Settings

Recent advances in health technologies - incorporating innovations like robotics, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and smart sensors - have raised expectations of a dramatic impact on health outcomes across the world. However, bringing innovative technologies to low resource settings has proven challenging, limiting their impact. Ironically, the current COVID-19 pandemic has become Exhibit 1 in the challenges the global health community faces in scaling innovative interventions. This course explores critical questions regarding the implementation and impact of technological innovations in low-resource settings. The course will feature thought leaders from the health technology community, who will explore examples of technologies that have been successful in low resource communities, as well as those that have failed. A subset of these examples will be drawn from the current pandemic. Students will think critically to consider conditions under which technologies reach scale and more »
Recent advances in health technologies - incorporating innovations like robotics, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and smart sensors - have raised expectations of a dramatic impact on health outcomes across the world. However, bringing innovative technologies to low resource settings has proven challenging, limiting their impact. Ironically, the current COVID-19 pandemic has become Exhibit 1 in the challenges the global health community faces in scaling innovative interventions. This course explores critical questions regarding the implementation and impact of technological innovations in low-resource settings. The course will feature thought leaders from the health technology community, who will explore examples of technologies that have been successful in low resource communities, as well as those that have failed. A subset of these examples will be drawn from the current pandemic. Students will think critically to consider conditions under which technologies reach scale and have positive impact in the global health field. Students will also have an opportunity to work on real-world projects, each of which will focus on the potential opportunity for a health technology in a low-resource setting and consider approaches to ensure its impact at scale. This course will be taught by Dr. Anurag Mairal, Adjunct Professor of Medicine and the Director, Global Outreach Programs at Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, and Dr. Michele Barry, Senior Associate Dean for Global Health. This course is open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and medical students. Undergraduates can take this course for a letter grade and 3 units. Graduate students and MD students can enroll for 2 units. Students enrolling in the course for a third unit will also work on group projects described above. Students enrolled in the class for three units will also have additional assignments, including weekly discussion posts. Students must submit an application and be selected to receive an enrollment code. The application form can be found at the following link: https://forms.gle/GHNzHgB1WuiVDXST8. Contact Olivia Paige with any questions: olivia.paige@stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit
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