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1 - 10 of 38 results for: CARDCOURSES::health ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students an immersive educational experience into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Students will also get a rare "behind-the-scenes" glimpse at the complex ethical dilemmas social entrepreneurs have tackled to navigate the odds. Partnered with TeachAids, a global award-winning nonprofit (scaled to 82 countries), this course introduces students to the major principles of research-based design and integrates instruction supported by several game-changing social leaders. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students, it culminates in a formal presentation to an interdisciplinary panel of diverse Silicon Valley leaders. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students an immersive educational experience into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Students will also get a rare "behind-the-scenes" glimpse at the complex ethical dilemmas social entrepreneurs have tackled to navigate the odds. Partnered with TeachAids, a global award-winning nonprofit (scaled to 82 countries), this course introduces students to the major principles of research-based design and integrates instruction supported by several game-changing social leaders. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students, it culminates in a formal presentation to an interdisciplinary panel of diverse Silicon Valley leaders. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3

BIOE 271: Frugal Science

As a society, we find ourselves surrounded by planetary-scale challenges ranging from lack of equitable access to health care to environmental degradation to dramatic loss of biodiversity. One common theme that runs across these challenges is the need to invent cost-effective solutions with the potential to scale. The COVID-19 pandemic provides yet another example of such a need. In this course, participants will learn principles of frugal science to design scalable solutions with a cost versus performance rubric and explore creative means to break the accessibility barrier. Using historic and current examples, we will emphasize the importance of first-principles science to tackle design challenges with everyday building blocks. Enrollment is open to all Stanford students from all schools/majors, who will team up with collaborators from across the globe to build concrete solutions to planetary-scale challenges. Come learn how to solve serious challenges with a little bit of play.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOE 375: Biodesign and Entrepreneurship for Societal Health (MED 236)

Addressing the systemic (Behavioral, Social, Environmental, Structural) drivers of health is a new frontier of entrepreneurship to improve global and public health at scale. In this hybrid seminar-based and experiential course, you will learn about challenges and opportunities for innovating in these areas. You will also design solutions and ventures aimed at tackling specific societal health problems. Our instructors and speakers are inspiring innovators and leaders in the fields of entrepreneurship and health. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CHPR 227: The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research (EPI 272)

The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Student more »
The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Students will gain practical experience in various community engagement tools and strategies to help guide the development of a community engagement plan responsive to community needs. Challenges and benefits of establishing community partnerships will be highlighted by real-world examples. nThe course will include lectures; interactive student-led presentations and guided exercises; class discussions among invited speakers, students and instructors; individual and group assignments; and organized small-group and experiential activities. Course readings will demonstrate the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary community engagement approaches and will illustrate how to conduct innovative community-engaged research. nThe Science of Community Engagement course is intended to reach students with diverse research interests, including clinical research, community health, health research and policy, epidemiology, prevention research, environmental health, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CHPR 239: Contemplative Competence for Sustainability of Public and Planetary Health and Well-being

This course is a Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. Through a contemplative approach, this course cultivates students' capacity to take skillful action to address climate change. Effective engagement with the daunting complexity inherent in the climate crisis requires calm contemplative competence. The science of mindfulness, resilience, emotional intelligence, and compassion are explored in terms of their roles in supporting pro-environmental behaviors, policies, and programs for personal, public, and planetary health and well-being. Emerging research at the intersection of contemplation and climate science calls for individual insight and transformation to strengthen/restore/heal the human-earth relationship. Contemplative research indicates that the extension of mindful compassion beyond oneself can improve health at the public and planetary level, in addition to the individual level. Contemplative practices effective for promoting mental health in relation to eco-despair more »
This course is a Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. Through a contemplative approach, this course cultivates students' capacity to take skillful action to address climate change. Effective engagement with the daunting complexity inherent in the climate crisis requires calm contemplative competence. The science of mindfulness, resilience, emotional intelligence, and compassion are explored in terms of their roles in supporting pro-environmental behaviors, policies, and programs for personal, public, and planetary health and well-being. Emerging research at the intersection of contemplation and climate science calls for individual insight and transformation to strengthen/restore/heal the human-earth relationship. Contemplative research indicates that the extension of mindful compassion beyond oneself can improve health at the public and planetary level, in addition to the individual level. Contemplative practices effective for promoting mental health in relation to eco-despair and eco-anxiety are addressed (including but not limited to nature-based centering, resilience-building mindfulness and loving kindness meditations, forest bathing, qigong, reflections on human-earth interconnectedness, and gratitude journaling.) Contemplative practices can prevent the burnout, avoidance, and disturbance of daily functioning that can arise from eco-anxiety. Moreover, research indicates contemplative practices can sustain altruistic behaviors that enhance mutual flourishing of people and the planet. Through study of contemplative neuroscience and behavioral science, students will develop/deepen their abilities for awareness, self-modulation, equanimity, self-transcendence, and compassion in caring for Earth. These skills will be discussed and applied to public health and climate change for effective behavioral action in a final class project. Modes of inquiry and class activities include contemplative, scientific, indigenous, artistic, verbal, visual, kinesthetic, sensory, emotional, spiritual, intellectual, social, and relational. Through diverse learning experiences, students will develop the empathy, discernment, and wisdom necessary for initiating and implementing solutions to the climate crisis. Course material equips students with knowledge from national and international leaders in the emerging field of contemplation, public health, and sustainability.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Rich, T. (PI)

CHPR 244: Contemplation by Design Summit: Translating contemplative science into timely community programming

Engage with contemplative science scholars, leaders, and teachers who apply contemplative practices to cultivate the democratic promise for equality, liberty, health, and well-being. This workshop immerses students in community-based engaged learning in which the community is the people of Stanford (students, staff, faculty, alumni, retirees, patients,and members of the local community). The course includes participation in two, Saturday, in-person, half-day sessions and in several online key sessions in the Contemplation By Design Summit. See the course notes section for the names of the Summit speakers and times of the Summit sessions included in this course. Through a three-part process, students will develop skills for: translating theory into practice, engaging in dialogue with the Summit speakers, and designing a contemplative science-based community program. Pre-workshop readings and an intention paper, and a post-workshop reflection paper and group discussion provide opportunit more »
Engage with contemplative science scholars, leaders, and teachers who apply contemplative practices to cultivate the democratic promise for equality, liberty, health, and well-being. This workshop immerses students in community-based engaged learning in which the community is the people of Stanford (students, staff, faculty, alumni, retirees, patients,and members of the local community). The course includes participation in two, Saturday, in-person, half-day sessions and in several online key sessions in the Contemplation By Design Summit. See the course notes section for the names of the Summit speakers and times of the Summit sessions included in this course. Through a three-part process, students will develop skills for: translating theory into practice, engaging in dialogue with the Summit speakers, and designing a contemplative science-based community program. Pre-workshop readings and an intention paper, and a post-workshop reflection paper and group discussion provide opportunities for exploring theoretical and methodological questions encountered in the translation of contemplative science to community programming.This course provides direct experience of a community-based contemplative science program on a university campus.Scholars have pointed to the role of American colleges and universities as embodied places of societal values and aspirations, reflecting both academic traditions and heritages alongside social and scientific change and innovation.Campus communities can engender positive outcomes including skills for inter- and intra-personal personal values,emotional intelligence, and civic engagement. Collectively, these outcomes can contribute to individual and community health and well-being, and a thriving functional democracy. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Rich, T. (PI)

COLLEGE 108: Where Does it Hurt?: Medicine and Suffering in Global Context

The relief of pain and suffering is considered one of the primary aims of medicine. However, what suffering is and what physicians must do specifically to prevent or relieve it is not well understood or explained. While suffering may be inherent to the human experience, the ways that suffering is perceived, experienced and addressed are heavily influenced by culture, beliefs and local resources. In this course, we will examine how patients and medical practitioners in different countries make meaning from the experience of pain and suffering of illness. We will draw from narratives and scholarly texts in order to explore how understandings of pain and suffering are shaped by social, cultural, economic and personal factors. Through an examination of personal, cultural and social practices related to suffering and medicine, we also develop skills for reflecting upon how one's culture and personal context influence how they make meaning of illness and suffering.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: College, THINK, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

DESIGN 261: Systems Design for Health: Reimagining Stanford Campus Town Center (SUSTAIN 128)

Taking a systems approach to health includes the deliberate upstream design of the places we live, learn, work, and play to support living in ways that keep people well - physically, emotionally, financially, and socially. No place at Stanford has more influence on campus health than the campus town center (roughly including Tresidder and White Plaza, the bookstore and post office, and Canfield Court and Meyer Green). In this high-stakes live course, students will explore upstream systems that influence health, health equity, and sustainability on campus. You will reimagine elements of Stanford?s town center to promote health by integrating concepts from public health, systems thinking, and design justice and using tools from product and policy design. Students will offer feedback and prototype new designs that will be presented for consideration to the town center project design team and advisors. This course is designed as an intensive one-week sprint.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

EDUC 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 335, EPI 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students an immersive educational experience into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Students will also get a rare "behind-the-scenes" glimpse at the complex ethical dilemmas social entrepreneurs have tackled to navigate the odds. Partnered with TeachAids, a global award-winning nonprofit (scaled to 82 countries), this course introduces students to the major principles of research-based design and integrates instruction supported by several game-changing social leaders. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students, it culminates in a formal presentation to an interdisciplinary panel of diverse Silicon Valley leaders. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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