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1 - 10 of 19 results for: CARDCOURSES::general ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Gibson, A. (PI)

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Gibson, A. (PI)

CSRE 178P: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (PUBLPOL 178, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

FRENLANG 23C: Second-Year French: Cultural Emphasis, Third Quarter

Continuation of FRENLANG 22C. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socio culturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: placement Test, FRENLANG 22C.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

ITALIC 99: Immersion in the Arts

Student-led courses in the arts. Topics change quarterly. Open to ALL students but current ITALIC students and alumni will be given priority.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ORALCOMM 130: ORALCOMM: Your American Life

This small seminar is designed for students interested in creating audio stories for radio or podcast. You will examine the craft elements of the medium, popularized by programs like This American Life, Radiolab and Serial, and then produce your own documentary, memoir, or investigative story. We will explore the basic principles of strong storytelling, and you will learn how to develop your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also examine craft elements unique to the audio form, and you will learn skills for interviewing, scoring, and audio editing. Students will have the opportunity to work with special guests from some of the best narrative podcasts in America. No prior experience with story craft or media required. Cardinal Course/CEL/HAAS
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Warga, J. (PI)

POLISCI 236: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

POLISCI 236S: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

PSYCH 7N: Learn to Intervene, Wisely

One of the most exciting transformations in the social sciences in recent years is the finding that brief psychological exercises can improve important outcomes for months and years such as raising school achievement and reducing inequality, improving health, and reducing intergroup conflict. These interventions help individuals flourish and help our society live up to its ideals. They address critical psychological questions people have, like ¿Do people like me belong in this school?¿, ¿Can I learn math?¿, ¿Am I bad mom?¿, and ¿Can groups in conflict change?¿. In this seminar, we will learn about ¿psychologically wise¿ interventions; how they work; how they can cause lasting benefits; their intellectual lineage; how they can be used, adapted, and scaled to address contemporary problems; and challenges and mistakes that can arise in doing so. In addition to learning from classic and contemporary research, you will design your very own wise intervention and workshop others¿ efforts. Wor more »
One of the most exciting transformations in the social sciences in recent years is the finding that brief psychological exercises can improve important outcomes for months and years such as raising school achievement and reducing inequality, improving health, and reducing intergroup conflict. These interventions help individuals flourish and help our society live up to its ideals. They address critical psychological questions people have, like ¿Do people like me belong in this school?¿, ¿Can I learn math?¿, ¿Am I bad mom?¿, and ¿Can groups in conflict change?¿. In this seminar, we will learn about ¿psychologically wise¿ interventions; how they work; how they can cause lasting benefits; their intellectual lineage; how they can be used, adapted, and scaled to address contemporary problems; and challenges and mistakes that can arise in doing so. In addition to learning from classic and contemporary research, you will design your very own wise intervention and workshop others¿ efforts. Working with a community partner, you will explore a problem your partner faces, identify a specific psychological process you think contributes to this problem, and design an intervention to address this process to improve outcomes, which your partner could implement and evaluate. You will share your approach in a final report with both your seminar-mates and your community partner. When you have completed this seminar, you will more fully understand the psychological aspect of social problems and how this can be addressed through rigorous research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4
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