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1 - 10 of 14 results for: CARDCOURSES::general ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206. COMM 106 is offered for 5 units, COMM 206 is offered for 4 units.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

COMPLIT 10SC: The Cult of Happiness: Pursuing the Good Life in America and China (CHINA 10SC)

The 2006 film Pursuit of Happyness, an unabashed celebration of the American Dream, was enthusiastically embraced by Chinese audiences. It seems that the pursuit of happiness has become truly globalized, even as the American Dream is slipping away for many. Are Americans still convinced that their conception of happiness is a self-evident truth and a universal gospel? Is there anything that Americans might learn about what it means to live a good life from not only the distant past, but also cultures in which happiness is envisioned and sought after very differently? This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the question of happiness and invites undergraduate students to reflect on its relationship to wealth, wisdom, health, love, pleasure, virtue, justice, and solidarity. Giving equal weight to Chinese and Western sources, it seeks to defamiliarize some of the most deeply held ideas and values in American society through the lens of cross-cultural inquiry.

nnDuring the su more »
The 2006 film Pursuit of Happyness, an unabashed celebration of the American Dream, was enthusiastically embraced by Chinese audiences. It seems that the pursuit of happiness has become truly globalized, even as the American Dream is slipping away for many. Are Americans still convinced that their conception of happiness is a self-evident truth and a universal gospel? Is there anything that Americans might learn about what it means to live a good life from not only the distant past, but also cultures in which happiness is envisioned and sought after very differently? This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the question of happiness and invites undergraduate students to reflect on its relationship to wealth, wisdom, health, love, pleasure, virtue, justice, and solidarity. Giving equal weight to Chinese and Western sources, it seeks to defamiliarize some of the most deeply held ideas and values in American society through the lens of cross-cultural inquiry.

nnDuring the summer, students will read a selection of novels, memoirs, and reflections by philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists. In September, we will review these texts and place them alongside movies, short fiction, news stories, and social commentary while we interrogate the chimera of happiness. In addition, we will experiment with meditation, short-form life writing (including mock-obituaries!), and service-learning.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Lee, H. (PI)

FRENLANG 10SC: French Immersion: Contemporary Issues in the French-Speaking World

A fresh look at the French historic motto, ¿Liberté, égalité, fraternité,¿ opens the door to our 2022 French Immersion Sophomore College classroom. For students to become confident and competent French speakers capable of engaging in higher level discussions on a variety of subjects, we will explore a plethora of political, social, and economic issues that resonate today in both French and American contexts. Literature, music, and the visual arts will often serve as the lens through which these issues will be studied and analyzed.

The course will draw upon a variety of oral and visual media (documentaries, feature films, podcasts and songs) and rely on written texts such as news articles, essays, blogs, short stories, and poems. These resources will engage students in written and oral conversations, offer opportunities for group and individual presentations as well as creative final projects. Classes will be focused on the development of oral proficiency through class discussion, g more »
A fresh look at the French historic motto, ¿Liberté, égalité, fraternité,¿ opens the door to our 2022 French Immersion Sophomore College classroom. For students to become confident and competent French speakers capable of engaging in higher level discussions on a variety of subjects, we will explore a plethora of political, social, and economic issues that resonate today in both French and American contexts. Literature, music, and the visual arts will often serve as the lens through which these issues will be studied and analyzed.

The course will draw upon a variety of oral and visual media (documentaries, feature films, podcasts and songs) and rely on written texts such as news articles, essays, blogs, short stories, and poems. These resources will engage students in written and oral conversations, offer opportunities for group and individual presentations as well as creative final projects. Classes will be focused on the development of oral proficiency through class discussion, group activities as well as integration of vocabulary and review of key structures.

Our course is above all an opportunity to join a French-speaking community through organized group outings (museums, plays, shared meals), on-campus activities such as pétanque (lawn-bowling), picnics and crêpe-making. Intensive interaction in the target language with classmates, instructors, and the Sophomore College Assistants (SCAs) will enable students to move beyond the intermediate range of spoken and written French.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2

LAW 807E: Policy Practicum: Redesigning the Venezuelan Judiciary: The Venezuelan Constitutional Crisis

Client: National Assembly of Venezuela, Special Committee for the Defense of the Constitution. Venezuela is undergoing a profound political, humanitarian, and economic crisis. Although a dictatorship currently reigns, reformers have begun to plan for a brighter and more democratic future. Students enrolled in this policy lab will have a unique opportunity to help set the terms of a future Venezuelan democracy (and institutional reforms) via a report to be submitted to the Venezuelan National Assembly, the only remaining democratic institution in the country. The report will inform efforts to create a new Venezuelan judiciary. Specifically, students will spearhead completion of a report designed to explore reforms and improvements to judicial independence, judicial appointments, the workings of the judiciary, and the broader legal system. Students will interact with Venezuelan congressional representatives, human rights experts, and research other countries' experiences with judicial re more »
Client: National Assembly of Venezuela, Special Committee for the Defense of the Constitution. Venezuela is undergoing a profound political, humanitarian, and economic crisis. Although a dictatorship currently reigns, reformers have begun to plan for a brighter and more democratic future. Students enrolled in this policy lab will have a unique opportunity to help set the terms of a future Venezuelan democracy (and institutional reforms) via a report to be submitted to the Venezuelan National Assembly, the only remaining democratic institution in the country. The report will inform efforts to create a new Venezuelan judiciary. Specifically, students will spearhead completion of a report designed to explore reforms and improvements to judicial independence, judicial appointments, the workings of the judiciary, and the broader legal system. Students will interact with Venezuelan congressional representatives, human rights experts, and research other countries' experiences with judicial reform. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms/. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Zambrano, D. (PI)

LAW 807H: Policy Practicum: Can Opening Up the Legal Services Market Increase Access to Justice?

The legal services market is in the middle of its most dramatic reexamination in decades. Several states --- among them California, Arizona, Utah, and Florida --- are considering or already implementing changes to their Rules of Professional Conduct in order to expand who can provide legal services and how. These reforms are designed to accelerate innovation in the delivery of legal services and, ultimately, increase access to justice, in part by allowing technology and people without JDs to play a greater role than they can today. As states consider these reforms, questions have come to the fore as to how potential changes may impact potential clients, existing clients, and providers of legal services. Significant questions include: Who are the nontraditional legal services providers most likely to seek to operate under the new rules? What are their delivery and business models? What kinds of consumers are they serving, and for what kinds of legal needs? What risks do they pose? With more »
The legal services market is in the middle of its most dramatic reexamination in decades. Several states --- among them California, Arizona, Utah, and Florida --- are considering or already implementing changes to their Rules of Professional Conduct in order to expand who can provide legal services and how. These reforms are designed to accelerate innovation in the delivery of legal services and, ultimately, increase access to justice, in part by allowing technology and people without JDs to play a greater role than they can today. As states consider these reforms, questions have come to the fore as to how potential changes may impact potential clients, existing clients, and providers of legal services. Significant questions include: Who are the nontraditional legal services providers most likely to seek to operate under the new rules? What are their delivery and business models? What kinds of consumers are they serving, and for what kinds of legal needs? What risks do they pose? With Utah and Arizona's reforms in place and new services providers entering those systems, we can start to answer these vital questions. Students will interview entrepreneurs, lawyers, and consumers to map the current and future provider landscape and will draft a report that offers guidance to the judges and policymakers who are shaping the future of access to justice. Likely clients for the lab include the Utah Supreme Court's Office of Legal Services Innovation and the Arizona Supreme Court. The lab's work will also inform the work of the State Bar of California's Closing the Justice Gap Working Group, on which two of the instructors serve as public appointed members. Students will emerge from the practicum with a richer understanding of the access to justice crisis in the United States and the range of legal, policy, and entrepreneurial interventions and opportunities that might address it. Students from a range of disciplines are welcome, including undergraduates interested in public policy. This is a one-quarter practicum. There may be a related practicum offered during spring quarter, but students do not need to commit to two quarters. Law students wishing to take the class for R credit will perform additional research or take on additional tasks. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Students who take the course for R credit may have the opportunity to attend a conference at Arizona State in February that focuses on these and other access-to-justice issues. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms/. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

LAW 807K: Policy Practicum: The Outlaw Ocean 3.0

Illegal fishing has long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific Ocean. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how this seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. A recent World Resources Institute study estimates that half of illegal marine trading networks come from the Pacific, totaling between 3.7 and 7.2 million tons of fish stolen from fishermen and coastal nations. Of further critical concern is the role of forced labor within the industry. This policy lab confronts the global environmental, human rights and privacy challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing and forced labor and slavery to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be develo more »
Illegal fishing has long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific Ocean. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how this seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. A recent World Resources Institute study estimates that half of illegal marine trading networks come from the Pacific, totaling between 3.7 and 7.2 million tons of fish stolen from fishermen and coastal nations. Of further critical concern is the role of forced labor within the industry. This policy lab confronts the global environmental, human rights and privacy challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing and forced labor and slavery to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be developed and deployed. The research contributes to the agendas of two organizations that are leaders in addressing Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing in supply chains (FishWise), and idenfifying leverage points to reduce forced labor and slavery in fishing activities (Rights Lab, University of Nottingham). Effective solutions to these problems required broad collaborations among nations, international seafood companies, nonprofit organizations, and universities. Students will have the opportunity to explore one of the following two topics. The Supply Chain Risk Tool (SCRT), co-led by FishWise, encompasses the development of a tool to enable companies to identify and address risk of IUU fishing activities in supply chains. The role of the students will be to design a user research plan, which could help to identify users, needs, and processes that the SCRT could support. A Port Resilience Framework to Address Forced Labor, co-led by colleagues from the Rights Lab at University of Nottingham, will be an effort to apply a resilience framework to address modern forms of slavery in port communities. Students will be able to apply resilience concepts to ports by identifying key systemic issues, legislative assets and problems, local institutions, and policies or practices. The Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions serves as the liaison to both policy clients stated above and will also connect students with partners such as large seafood companies, and human rights and environmental NGOs. Students will produce policy briefs that will contribute to a third installment in a comprehensive public report issued by the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions. The practicum seeks law students as well as graduate and well-qualified undergraduate students in such programs as earth systems, computer science, public policy, business, sociology, and marine biology. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the home
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAWGEN 209Q: Exploring Campus Public Safety

This course explores the multitude of roles, responsibilities and services provided by the Stanford Department of Public Safety. Classes will provide opportunities to engage in discussion and gather insights through experiential learning. A range of topics will be covered regarding police-community interactions and types of response, as well as scenarios involving traffic stops, a field sobriety testing lab, and the use of force. These sessions are intended to enrich your knowledge of working in campus public safety, cultivate relationships, and foster understanding with the community to which we all belong. This class meets Wednesday nights from 5:30 - 7:30pm in the Winter Quarter, beginning January 5. Students taking the course for 1 unit of credit will be required to submit a 2-page reflection essay for each class that includes external source material (recommended resource list will be provided). While this course is open to all students throughout the University, the units will not accrue to Law Degree Candidates for credit toward a degree in Law (JD, JSM, JSD, or LLM). Prerequisites: Application and basic background check; minimum 18 years of age.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Wilson, L. (PI)

POLISCI 236: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

POLISCI 236S: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

PSYCH 150B: Race and Crime Practicum (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in PSYCH 150 Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. Prerequisite: PSYCH 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
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