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1 - 10 of 14 results for: CARDCOURSES::general ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AMSTUD 150X: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (HISTORY 252E, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Pan, J. (PI)

LAW 807K: Policy Practicum: The Outlaw Ocean

Illegal fishing and forced labor aboard fishing vessels have long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. This policy lab confronts the global environmental and human rights challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing, supply chains, forced labor and human rights abuses to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be developed and deployed. The research contributes to a work of The Friends of Ocean Action -- convened by the World Economic Forum -- a coalition of public sector, private sector, and civil society leaders who are committed to accelerating action for more »
Illegal fishing and forced labor aboard fishing vessels have long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. This policy lab confronts the global environmental and human rights challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing, supply chains, forced labor and human rights abuses to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be developed and deployed. The research contributes to a work of The Friends of Ocean Action -- convened by the World Economic Forum -- a coalition of public sector, private sector, and civil society leaders who are committed to accelerating action for sustainability. Solutions require cooperation among nations, international seafood companies, and nonprofit organizations, and the containment of rogue actors. In this policy lab, students will work with two clients. On illegal fishing, the client is Global Fishing Watch. Created through a collaboration among Google and other partners, Global Fishing Watch is a pioneer in harnessing satellite technology to enable better management of fisheries. On forced labor, the client is the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, which brings together tuna processors who comprise more than 70% of the global market for canned tuna and is committed to developing solutions to address forced labor on fishing vessels in the tuna sector and beyond. Through the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, students will also connect to a broad range of additional actors on these issues, including UN agencies, large seafood companies, and human rights and environmental NGOs. Students will produce policy briefs that will be published by the Center for Ocean Solutions. The practicum seeks law students, business students, and graduate and well-qualified undergraduates in such programs as earth systems, computer science, product design, public policy, sociology, and marine biology. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Class will meet meet on Wednesday, 9-11am, on Zoom in Autumn 2020. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

POLISCI 236: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

POLISCI 236S: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236)

What is the basis of private action for public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in civil society and modern democracy? In the "Philanthropy Lab" component of this course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

PSYCH 150B: Race and Crime Practicum (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in PSYCH 150 Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. Prerequisite: PSYCH 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4

PUBLPOL 178: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (CSRE 178P, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 200B: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

PUBLPOL 200C: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

PWR 2SM: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Dirty Pretty Things: The Rhetoric of Objects and Objectification

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Further work in developing skills in argument and research-based writing, with emphasis on both written and oral/multimedia presentation of research. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
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