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1 - 10 of 23 results for: CARDCOURSES::general ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CSRE 178P: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (PUBLPOL 178, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

FRENLANG 10SC: French Immersion: Contemporary Issues in the French-Speaking World

Are you interested in all things French? Do you want to increase your French proficiency through an intense immersion program right here at Stanford? The answer is "French Immersion: Contemporary Issues in the French-Speaking World," a course designed to help students move towards greater linguistic and cultural competence. French Immersion is intended for students who have completed the equivalent of a year of French. In this class you will gain the cultural, historical, and linguistic knowledge necessary for taking future advanced French courses. You will enhance your French proficiency through intensive lessons and interaction in the target language. The content will include film, literature, news videos, and songs that reflect the cultural and social realities that the French-speaking world faces today. You will gain a deeper understanding of French and Francophone cultural products and practices through the exploration of a variety of topics such as art, fashion, cuisine in current French society. The course will include a range of in-class activities, organized off-campus excursions, a cooking workshop, art projects, and more, all in French!
Terms: Sum | Units: 2

FRENLANG 23C: Second-Year French: Cultural Emphasis, Third Quarter

Continuation of FRENLANG 22C. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socio culturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: placement Test, FRENLANG 22C.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

ITALIC 99: Immersion in the Arts

Student-led courses in the arts. Topics change quarterly. Open to ALL students but current ITALIC students and alumni will be given priority.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Supporting INTERPOL's Efforts to Combat Transnational Crime

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national police agencies is critical in combatting cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization---has aggressively worked to counter criminal networks across the globe by facilitating international police cooperation through global information sharing via its criminal databases. To conduct cross-border investigations and tackle organized crime, the law enforcement agencies around the globe can instantly access millions of records on fingerprints, DNA, stolen motor vehicles, firearms, and travel documents stored in INTERPOL's databases. Only the designated law enforcement agencies from INTERPOL's member countries are authorized to share and add information to these databases. This project builds on research more »
Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national police agencies is critical in combatting cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization---has aggressively worked to counter criminal networks across the globe by facilitating international police cooperation through global information sharing via its criminal databases. To conduct cross-border investigations and tackle organized crime, the law enforcement agencies around the globe can instantly access millions of records on fingerprints, DNA, stolen motor vehicles, firearms, and travel documents stored in INTERPOL's databases. Only the designated law enforcement agencies from INTERPOL's member countries are authorized to share and add information to these databases. This project builds on research conducted through past iterations of this practicum contributing to INTERPOL's Strategic Framework 2017-2020. Research teams will work directly with senior INTERPOL officials (via video-conferencing and email) to help modernize INTERPOL's organizational structure and improve the agency's efforts to counter cyber-crime and terrorism. Research will likely focus on how INTERPOL can amend its Rules on the Processing of Data and its Constitution to provide the organization with greater flexibility in receiving information from the private sector. The research may also focus on understanding the role of open source data in cyber investigations and identify the legal and policy challenges INTERPOL's criminal intelligence officers may face when relying on open source info in their analysis. This Practicum is open to graduate students from law (2L, 3L, and Advanced Degree), business, international policy, communications, computer science, and other relevant programs. Highly qualified undergraduates are also invited to apply. The practicum meets 9-10:30 on Wednesdays. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 255) in Autumn and Winter.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

LAWGEN 209Q: Community Police Academy

The Community Police Academy is a combination of classroom instruction and "hands-on" activities that examine life as a police officer. This class looks to clarify and expand the participant's knowledge of the responsibilities, decisions and constraints that face law enforcement officers today, while also providing some perspectives on the national conversation about the role of law enforcement in society. Students can elect to earn two units of credit by completing the readings, short assignments, and attending 4 discussion section meetings, or students may opt to take the course for no credits and only attend the activities. The class is learning opportunity for all involved, an opportunity to build trust and develop partnerships between the Department of Public Safety and the Stanford community. While this course is open to all students throughout the University, the units will not accrue to Law Degree Candidates for credit toward a degree in Law (JD, JSM, JSD, or LLM). Prerequisites: Application and basic background check; minimum 18 years of age.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Wilson, L. (PI)

ORALCOMM 129: Sound Stories

This seminar is designed for students interested in creating audio stories for radio, podcast, and other forms of sonic narrative. Students will examine the craft elements of the audio form, popularized by programs such as This American Life, Radiolab, and Serial including skills for interviewing, scoring, and audio editing, and will then produce their own documentary, memoir, or investigative story. This is a hybrid class, equal parts classic seminar and creative workshop. Students will work in small groups, learning how to develop material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue in order to create engaging stories with social impact. Recommended for students interested not only in podcasting but also creative nonfiction, documentary, film, and sound art. No prior experience with story craft or media required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Naiman, T. (PI)

ORALCOMM 130: ORALCOMM: Your American Life

This small seminar is designed for students interested in creating audio stories for radio or podcast. You will examine the craft elements of the medium, popularized by programs like This American Life, Radiolab and Serial, and then produce your own documentary, memoir, or investigative story. We will explore the basic principles of strong storytelling, and you will learn how to develop your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also examine craft elements unique to the audio form, and you will learn skills for interviewing, scoring, and audio editing. Students will have the opportunity to work with special guests from some of the best narrative podcasts in America. No prior experience with story craft or media required. Cardinal Course/CEL/HAAS
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
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