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1 - 10 of 73 results for: CARDCOURSES::env ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 169A: Race, Ethnicity, and Water in Urban California (AMSTUD 169, CSRE 260, URBANST 169)

Is water a human right or an entitlement? Who controls the water, and who should control the water, in California? Private companies? Nonprofits? Local residents? Federal, state, or local governments? This course will explore these questions in the context of urban California more generally, the players and the politics to make sense of a complex problem with deep historical roots; one that defines the new century in California urban life. The required readings and discussions cover cities from Oakland to Los Angeles, providing a platform for students to explore important environmental issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid population change. In addition, our research focus will be on the cities located on the Central Coast of California: agricultural Salinas, Watsonville, and Castroville and towns along the Salinas Valley; tourist based Monterey, Pebble Beach, Carmel, Pacific Grove; the bedroom community of Prunedale to the north, and former mil more »
Is water a human right or an entitlement? Who controls the water, and who should control the water, in California? Private companies? Nonprofits? Local residents? Federal, state, or local governments? This course will explore these questions in the context of urban California more generally, the players and the politics to make sense of a complex problem with deep historical roots; one that defines the new century in California urban life. The required readings and discussions cover cities from Oakland to Los Angeles, providing a platform for students to explore important environmental issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid population change. In addition, our research focus will be on the cities located on the Central Coast of California: agricultural Salinas, Watsonville, and Castroville and towns along the Salinas Valley; tourist based Monterey, Pebble Beach, Carmel, Pacific Grove; the bedroom community of Prunedale to the north, and former military towns, Marina and Seaside, as all of these ethnically, socioeconomically diverse communities engage in political struggles over precious, and ever scarcer water resources, contend with catastrophic events such as droughts and floods, and fight battles over rights to clean water, entitlement, environmental racism, and equity. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 169: Race, Ethnicity, and Water in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, CSRE 260, URBANST 169)

Is water a human right or an entitlement? Who controls the water, and who should control the water, in California? Private companies? Nonprofits? Local residents? Federal, state, or local governments? This course will explore these questions in the context of urban California more generally, the players and the politics to make sense of a complex problem with deep historical roots; one that defines the new century in California urban life. The required readings and discussions cover cities from Oakland to Los Angeles, providing a platform for students to explore important environmental issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid population change. In addition, our research focus will be on the cities located on the Central Coast of California: agricultural Salinas, Watsonville, and Castroville and towns along the Salinas Valley; tourist based Monterey, Pebble Beach, Carmel, Pacific Grove; the bedroom community of Prunedale to the north, and former mil more »
Is water a human right or an entitlement? Who controls the water, and who should control the water, in California? Private companies? Nonprofits? Local residents? Federal, state, or local governments? This course will explore these questions in the context of urban California more generally, the players and the politics to make sense of a complex problem with deep historical roots; one that defines the new century in California urban life. The required readings and discussions cover cities from Oakland to Los Angeles, providing a platform for students to explore important environmental issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid population change. In addition, our research focus will be on the cities located on the Central Coast of California: agricultural Salinas, Watsonville, and Castroville and towns along the Salinas Valley; tourist based Monterey, Pebble Beach, Carmel, Pacific Grove; the bedroom community of Prunedale to the north, and former military towns, Marina and Seaside, as all of these ethnically, socioeconomically diverse communities engage in political struggles over precious, and ever scarcer water resources, contend with catastrophic events such as droughts and floods, and fight battles over rights to clean water, entitlement, environmental racism, and equity. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

BIO 7N: Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

BIO 101: Science for Conservation Policy: Meeting California's Pledge to Protect 30% by 2030 (EARTHSYS 101C)

California has set the ambitious goal of conserving 30% of its lands and waters by the year 2030. In this course, students will develop science-based recommendations to help policymakers reach this '30 by 30' goal. Through lectures, labs, and field trips, students will gain practical skills in ecology, protected area design in the face of climate change, and science communication. Students will apply these skills to analyze real-world data, formulate conservation recommendations, and communicate their findings in verbal and written testimony to policymakers. Prerequisites: BIO 81 or BIO/ EARTHSYS 105 or BIO/ EARTHSYS 111 or instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

BIOE 271: Frugal Science

As a society, we find ourselves surrounded by planetary-scale challenges ranging from lack of equitable access to health care to environmental degradation to dramatic loss of biodiversity. One common theme that runs across these challenges is the need to invent cost-effective solutions with the potential to scale. The COVID-19 pandemic provides yet another example of such a need. In this course, participants will learn principles of frugal science to design scalable solutions with a cost versus performance rubric and explore creative means to break the accessibility barrier. Using historic and current examples, we will emphasize the importance of first-principles science to tackle design challenges with everyday building blocks. Enrollment is open to all Stanford students from all schools/majors, who will team up with collaborators from across the globe to build concrete solutions to planetary-scale challenges. Come learn how to solve serious challenges with a little bit of play.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOE 375: Biodesign and Entrepreneurship for Societal Health (MED 236)

Addressing the systemic (Behavioral, Social, Environmental, Structural) drivers of health is a new frontier of entrepreneurship to improve global and public health at scale. In this hybrid seminar-based and experiential course, you will learn about challenges and opportunities for innovating in these areas. You will also design solutions and ventures aimed at tackling specific societal health problems. Our instructors and speakers are inspiring innovators and leaders in the fields of entrepreneurship and health. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CEE 165H: Big Earth Hackathon Wildland Fire Challenge (CEE 265H)

Come and tackle a problem in sustainability by participating in Stanford's Big Earth Hackathon challenge on wildland fires and finding an innovative solution to wildland fire prediction, mitigation, and/or equity and fairness. Students work in self-organized diverse teams of 1-4 students in weeks 1-8, with a final presentation of the work on Friday May 31. The teams will spend the first few weeks designing their specific team problem/scope/goals under one or more of the three primary areas of focus. Guidance in the design and solution processes will be provided by faculty, industry and/or community leaders. Workshops in data analysis, programming, GIS, and fundamental issues related to wildfires will be provided at the start of the quarter to give students tools and insights to define and tackle problems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Fong, D. (PI)

CEE 218Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (EPS 118Y, EPS 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 118Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

(Formerly GEOLSCI 118Y and 218Y) The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban chal more »
(Formerly GEOLSCI 118Y and 218Y) The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) and Winter (Y) courses are focused on basic and advanced skills, respectively, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Spring (Z) practicum quarter, which engages teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X and Y are composed of four weekly pedagogical components: (A) lectures; (B) writing prompts linked with small group discussion; (C) lab and self-guided tutorials on the R programming language; and (D) R data analysis assignments. Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu/education. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. Change of Department Name: Earth and Planetary Science (Formerly Geologic Sciences).
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 218Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (EPS 118Z, EPS 218Z, ESS 118Z, ESS 218Z, GEOPHYS 118Z, GEOPHYS 218Z, POLISCI 118Z, PUBLPOL 118Z, PUBLPOL 218Z)

(Formerly GEOLSCI 118Z and 218Z) Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. Change of Department Name: Earth and Planetary Science (Formerly Geologic Sciences).
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 265F: Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience (POLISCI 227B, PUBLPOL 265F, SUSTAIN 248)

Adaptation to climate change will not only require new infrastructure and policies, but it will also challenge our local, state and national governments to collaborate across jurisdictional lines in ways that include many different types of private and nonprofit organizations and individual actors. The course explores what it means for communities to be resilient and how they can reach that goal in an equitable and effective way. Using wildfires in California as a case study, the course assesses specific strategies, such as controlled burns and building codes, and a range of planning and policy measures that can be used to enhance climate resilience. In addition, it considers how climate change and development of forested exurban areas (among other factors) have influenced the size and severity of wildfires. The course also examines the obstacles communities face in selecting and implementing adaptation measures (e.g., resource constraints, incentives to develop in forested areas, inad more »
Adaptation to climate change will not only require new infrastructure and policies, but it will also challenge our local, state and national governments to collaborate across jurisdictional lines in ways that include many different types of private and nonprofit organizations and individual actors. The course explores what it means for communities to be resilient and how they can reach that goal in an equitable and effective way. Using wildfires in California as a case study, the course assesses specific strategies, such as controlled burns and building codes, and a range of planning and policy measures that can be used to enhance climate resilience. In addition, it considers how climate change and development of forested exurban areas (among other factors) have influenced the size and severity of wildfires. The course also examines the obstacles communities face in selecting and implementing adaptation measures (e.g., resource constraints, incentives to develop in forested areas, inadequate policy enforcement, and weak inter-agency coordination). Officials from various Bay Area organizations contribute to aspects of the course; and students will present final papers to local government offcials. Limited enrollment. Students will be asked to prepare application essays on the first day of class. Course is intended for seniors and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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