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1 - 10 of 53 results for: CARDCOURSES::env ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 204: Race, Colonialism, and Climate Justice in the Caribbean

Caribbean nations and territories remain on the frontlines of climate change despite being minor contributors to global warming. How has the history of environmental racism, colonialism, and environmental justice movements shaped our understanding of blackness and the environment in the Caribbean archipelago? In the face of the climate crisis, this course examines the role that (neo)coloniality plays in constructing precarious subjectivities. Environmental disasters¿namely, the 2010 Earthquake in Haiti, the 2017 Hurricanes Irma and Maria in the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and Dominica, and the 2019 Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas¿breathe new life into fervent conversations about precarity, dependency, disaster capitalism, anti-Blackness, colonial oversight, neoliberalism, and debt. Students will participate in these critical conversations and gain a deeper understanding of imperial and colonial histories and the intersections of decolonial, racial, and environmental politics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

BIO 7N: Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

CEE 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

CEE 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 118Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Z, ESS 118Z, ESS 218Z, GEOLSCI 118Z, GEOLSCI 218Z, GEOPHYS 118Z, GEOPHYS 218Z, POLISCI 218Z)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

CEE 218Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 218Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Z, ESS 118Z, ESS 218Z, GEOLSCI 118Z, GEOLSCI 218Z, GEOPHYS 118Z, GEOPHYS 218Z, POLISCI 218Z)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Exploring and Expanding Environmental Justice in Practice (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been shaped by a limited view of the environmental justice movement, often centered on urban environmental threats and separated from other types of environmental and climate advocacy. This course will seek to expand on these discussions by exploring topics such as access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, inclusion in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, the influence of colonialism on ways of knowing, food justice and ethics, and the future of climate change policy. The course will also involve a community partnership project. In small groups students will work with an environmental organization to problem-solve around issues of equity, representation, and access. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemologies and welcome undergraduates from all disciplines. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation and commitment to community partnerships. This course requires instructor approval, please submit an application by March 7th at midnight. Application available at https://forms.gle/chBoCLX3WKSA7kBF6.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

EARTH 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Saltzman, J. (PI)
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