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21 - 30 of 34 results for: CARDCOURSES::env ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EARTHSYS 225: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 125, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 276: Open Space Management Practicum (EARTHSYS 176)

The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the East Bay Regional Parks District. Grass Roots Ecology or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research desig more »
The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the East Bay Regional Parks District. Grass Roots Ecology or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in conservation biology and ecology, community and stakeholder engagement, land use policy and planning, and the practical aspects of land and environmental management.nnAll students must complete the course application and turn it into Rachel Engstrand (rce212@stanford.edu) and Briana Swette (bswette@stanford.edu) by email. To receive priority consideration and an enrollment code, please submit the application by Monday September 10th, 2018. The course application consists of a short paragraph about your background and interest in and preparation for working on a real-world community-engaged earth systems project. The total course enrollment is necessarily limited by the project-based nature of the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 470: Practicum

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alvarado, A. (PI) ; Antonio, A. (PI) ; Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Atkin, J. (PI) ; Aukerman, M. (PI) ; Ball, A. (PI) ; Barron, B. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Blikstein, P. (PI) ; Booker, A. (PI) ; Bridges, E. (PI) ; Brown, B. (PI) ; Brown, N. (PI) ; Bryk, T. (PI) ; Calfee, R. (PI) ; Callan, E. (PI) ; Carnoy, M. (PI) ; Cuban, L. (PI) ; Damon, W. (PI) ; Darling-Hammond, L. (PI) ; Davis, S. (PI) ; Eisner, E. (PI) ; Fogg, B. (PI) ; Gage, N. (PI) ; Goldman, S. (PI) ; Gordon, L. (PI) ; Greeno, J. (PI) ; Grossman, P. (PI) ; Gumport, P. (PI) ; Haertel, E. (PI) ; Hakuta, K. (PI) ; Hanushek, E. (PI) ; Heath, S. (PI) ; Juel, C. (PI) ; Kamil, M. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kirst, M. (PI) ; Krumboltz, J. (PI) ; LaFromboise, T. (PI) ; Labaree, D. (PI) ; Levin, H. (PI) ; Lit, I. (PI) ; Loeb, S. (PI) ; Lotan, R. (PI) ; Lythcott, J. (PI) ; March, J. (PI) ; Martinez, A. (PI) ; Massy, W. (PI) ; McDermott, R. (PI) ; McFarland, D. (PI) ; McLaughlin, M. (PI) ; Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI) ; Meyerson, D. (PI) ; Murata, A. (PI) ; Nasir, N. (PI) ; Noddings, N. (PI) ; Olkin, I. (PI) ; Padilla, A. (PI) ; Pea, R. (PI) ; Perez-Granados, D. (PI) ; Phillips, D. (PI) ; Pope, D. (PI) ; Porteus, A. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Powell, W. (PI) ; Ramirez, F. (PI) ; Reich, R. (PI) ; Rickford, J. (PI) ; Rogosa, D. (PI) ; Rohlen, T. (PI) ; Schwartz, D. (PI) ; Shavelson, R. (PI) ; Shulman, L. (PI) ; Simms, W. (PI) ; Spindler, G. (PI) ; Staklis, S. (PI) ; Stipek, D. (PI) ; Stout, F. (PI) ; Strober, M. (PI) ; Suarez, D. (PI) ; Thoresen, C. (PI) ; Tyack, D. (PI) ; Valdes, G. (PI) ; Walker, D. (PI) ; Weiler, H. (PI) ; Williamson, J. (PI) ; Willinsky, J. (PI) ; Wineburg, S. (PI) ; Wotipka, C. (PI) ; reardon, s. (PI)

ENERGY 203: Stanford Energy Ventures

Solving the global energy challenge will require the creation and successful scale-up of hundreds of new ventures. This project-based course provides a launchpad for the development and creation of transformational energy ventures and innovation models. Interdisciplinary teams will research, analyze, and develop detailed launch plans for high-impact opportunities in the context of the new energy venture development framework offered in this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENVRES 245: Psychological Insights for Science Communication

This course integrates lessons learned from psychology, behavioral economics, marketing, and sociology to the practice of science communication, with practical experience working to create and test new messaging for partner environmental organizations. Students learn about innate biases and heuristics that influence the communication of scientific ideas and data and the public¿s receptiveness to environmental messaging. Topics covered include information framing, attention and salience, public science literacy and numeracy, simplifying complexity and dealing with uncertainty, cultural and political contexts and social norms, and methods to motivate science engagement, evidence-based decision-making, and behavior change. Students will learn how to design new messaging strategies based on social science research and how to analyze their efficacy using basic statistical analyses in R (no prior programming knowledge is required). The course culminates in a project developing and testing new messaging strategies for real-world environmental organizations.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 118X: Sustainable Urban Systems Fundamentals (ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental mindsets and toolsets that they can apply to real-world problem solving in the context of urban systems. It focuses on fundamental quantitative and qualitative methods for acquiring knowledge and assessing performance of urban systems. Quantitative methods covered include geographic information systems, advanced Excel methods and basic statistics, and qualitative approaches will include stakeholder engagement as well as ethical guidelines governing work with community groups. The course will also introduce four key types of systems performance: well-being, sustainability, resilience and equity. Topics covered are those students can expect to encounter as they pursue their future careers. The course is also a prerequisite for participation in the Sustainable Urban Systems Projects which take place in Winter ( CEE 224Y) and Spring ( CEE 224Z). Those SUS Projects are designed to immerse student teams in current planning challenges through service to local public and private sector stakeholders; they will require high levels of self-driven learning, time commitment, professionalism, and collaboration. Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 118Y: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Y, CEE 224Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 118Z: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Z, CEE 224Z, GEOPHYS 218Z)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 218X: Sustainable Urban Systems Fundamentals (ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental mindsets and toolsets that they can apply to real-world problem solving in the context of urban systems. It focuses on fundamental quantitative and qualitative methods for acquiring knowledge and assessing performance of urban systems. Quantitative methods covered include geographic information systems, advanced Excel methods and basic statistics, and qualitative approaches will include stakeholder engagement as well as ethical guidelines governing work with community groups. The course will also introduce four key types of systems performance: well-being, sustainability, resilience and equity. Topics covered are those students can expect to encounter as they pursue their future careers. The course is also a prerequisite for participation in the Sustainable Urban Systems Projects which take place in Winter ( CEE 224Y) and Spring ( CEE 224Z). Those SUS Projects are designed to immerse student teams in current planning challenges through service to local public and private sector stakeholders; they will require high levels of self-driven learning, time commitment, professionalism, and collaboration. Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 218Y: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Y, CEE 224Y, GEOPHYS 118Y)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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