2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

1 - 10 of 55 results for: CARDCOURSES::eng ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CEE 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

CEE 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 118Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Z, ESS 118Z, ESS 218Z, GEOLSCI 118Z, GEOLSCI 218Z, GEOPHYS 118Z, GEOPHYS 218Z, POLISCI 218Z)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 177S: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 277S, ENGR 177B, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

CEE 177X: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 277X, ENGR 177A, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, sociopolitical, organizational, technical, and ethical issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in a developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs, local communities, and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on cultural awareness, ethical implications, user requirements, conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation planning. Admission is by application. Students should plan to enroll in CEE 177S/277S ( ENGR 177B/277B) Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation following successful completion of this course. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service. To satisfy a Ways requirement, students must register for an undergraduate course number ( CEE 177S or ENGR 177A) and this course must be taken for at least 3 units. In AY 2020-21, a letter grade or `CR' grade satisfies the Ways requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

CEE 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

CEE 218Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 218Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Z, ESS 118Z, ESS 218Z, GEOLSCI 118Z, GEOLSCI 218Z, GEOPHYS 118Z, GEOPHYS 218Z, POLISCI 218Z)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 277S: Engineering and Sustainable Development (CEE 177S, ENGR 177B, ENGR 277B)

The second of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. This quarter focuses on implementation, evaluation, and deployment of the designs developed in the winter quarter. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints