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1 - 10 of 172 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (CS 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 142: Beyond Incarceration (ANTHRO 141)

The prison's hold on society is not limited to the millions within its walls and wider surveillance apparatus, what we might call mass incarceration, nor is it limited to the vast political and economic network which supports incarceration, that is, the prison industrial complex. It also has a hold on our minds. As Angela Davis argues in Are Prisons Obsolete, "The prison is considered so 'natural' that it is extremely hard to imagine life without it." This is what makes the United States a carceral society. In this service learning course we will take on the monumental and timely task of developing that abolitionist imaginary. We will not be making this journey alone, but will draw on the visions of activists, academics, and currently/formerly incarcerated scholars and artists to guide us. The course has two community partner organizations. With our first community partner, the Ella Baker Center, we will participate in the Prison Mail Night, where we will learn about the real situation more »
The prison's hold on society is not limited to the millions within its walls and wider surveillance apparatus, what we might call mass incarceration, nor is it limited to the vast political and economic network which supports incarceration, that is, the prison industrial complex. It also has a hold on our minds. As Angela Davis argues in Are Prisons Obsolete, "The prison is considered so 'natural' that it is extremely hard to imagine life without it." This is what makes the United States a carceral society. In this service learning course we will take on the monumental and timely task of developing that abolitionist imaginary. We will not be making this journey alone, but will draw on the visions of activists, academics, and currently/formerly incarcerated scholars and artists to guide us. The course has two community partner organizations. With our first community partner, the Ella Baker Center, we will participate in the Prison Mail Night, where we will learn about the real situations of currently incarcerated people and contribute to the procedural abolitionist task of helping people decarcerate themselves. With our second community partner, the Ahimsa Collective, will run weekly transformative justice circles for us to process the contents of the class and to learn a key process in the abolitionist toolkit. Alongside the service learning elements the syllabus is structured in three parts. In the first two weeks we will reflect on the deep history and global geography of the abolitionist struggle, as we can't know where we're going unless we know where we've come from. The middle five weeks will be a whistle-stop tour of current abolitionist struggles, from Abolish ICE to decriminalizing sex work, viewing the broader question of an abolitionist future from the unique issues foregrounded in each struggle. The final three weeks will be dedicated to developing final class projects, which will take the form of speculative artworks which explore the possible future of one abolitionist struggle. This class will be entirely virtual.nnCardinal Course certified by the Haas Center
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

AFRICAAM 164A: Race and Performance (CSRE 164A, CSRE 364A, TAPS 164)

How does race function in performance and dare we say ¿live and in living color?¿ How does one deconstruct discrimination at its roots?n nFrom a perspective of global solidarity and recognition of shared plight among BIPOC communities, we will read and perform plays that represent material and psychological conditions under a common supremacist regime. Where and when possible, we will host a member of the creative team of some plays in our class for a live discussion. Assigned materials include works by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Amiri Baraka, Young Jean Lee, Ayad Akhtar, Susan Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Betty Shamieh, Jeremy O. Harris, and Christopher Demos Brown.n nThis class offers undergraduate students a discussion that does not center whiteness, but takes power, history, culture, philosophy, and hierarchy as core points of debate. In the first two weeks, we will establish the common terms of the discussion about stereotypes, representation, and historical claims, but then we will qu more »
How does race function in performance and dare we say ¿live and in living color?¿ How does one deconstruct discrimination at its roots?n nFrom a perspective of global solidarity and recognition of shared plight among BIPOC communities, we will read and perform plays that represent material and psychological conditions under a common supremacist regime. Where and when possible, we will host a member of the creative team of some plays in our class for a live discussion. Assigned materials include works by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Amiri Baraka, Young Jean Lee, Ayad Akhtar, Susan Lori Parks, David Henry Hwang, Betty Shamieh, Jeremy O. Harris, and Christopher Demos Brown.n nThis class offers undergraduate students a discussion that does not center whiteness, but takes power, history, culture, philosophy, and hierarchy as core points of debate. In the first two weeks, we will establish the common terms of the discussion about stereotypes, representation, and historical claims, but then we will quickly move toward an advanced conversation about effective discourse and activism through art, performance, and cultural production. In this class, we assume that colonialism, slavery, white supremacy, and oppressive contemporary state apparatuses are real, undeniable, and manifest. Since our starting point is clear, our central question is not about recognizing or delineating the issues, but rather, it is a debate about how to identify the target of our criticism in order to counter oppression effectively and dismantle long-standing structures.n nNot all BIPOC communities are represented in this syllabus, as such claim of inclusion in a single quarter would be tokenistic and disingenuous. Instead, we will aspire to understand and negotiate some of the complexities related to race in several communities locally in the U.S. and beyond.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

AFRICAAM 204: Race, Colonialism, and Climate Justice in the Caribbean

Caribbean nations and territories remain on the frontlines of climate change despite being minor contributors to global warming. How has the history of environmental racism, colonialism, and environmental justice movements shaped our understanding of blackness and the environment in the Caribbean archipelago? In the face of the climate crisis, this course examines the role that (neo)coloniality plays in constructing precarious subjectivities. Environmental disasters¿namely, the 2010 Earthquake in Haiti, the 2017 Hurricanes Irma and Maria in the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and Dominica, and the 2019 Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas¿breathe new life into fervent conversations about precarity, dependency, disaster capitalism, anti-Blackness, colonial oversight, neoliberalism, and debt. Students will participate in these critical conversations and gain a deeper understanding of imperial and colonial histories and the intersections of decolonial, racial, and environmental politics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

AMSTUD 157P: Solidarity and Racial Justice (AFRICAAM 157P, CSRE 157P, FEMGEN 157P)

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

ANTHRO 141: Beyond Incarceration (AFRICAAM 142)

The prison's hold on society is not limited to the millions within its walls and wider surveillance apparatus, what we might call mass incarceration, nor is it limited to the vast political and economic network which supports incarceration, that is, the prison industrial complex. It also has a hold on our minds. As Angela Davis argues in Are Prisons Obsolete, "The prison is considered so 'natural' that it is extremely hard to imagine life without it." This is what makes the United States a carceral society. In this service learning course we will take on the monumental and timely task of developing that abolitionist imaginary. We will not be making this journey alone, but will draw on the visions of activists, academics, and currently/formerly incarcerated scholars and artists to guide us. The course has two community partner organizations. With our first community partner, the Ella Baker Center, we will participate in the Prison Mail Night, where we will learn about the real situation more »
The prison's hold on society is not limited to the millions within its walls and wider surveillance apparatus, what we might call mass incarceration, nor is it limited to the vast political and economic network which supports incarceration, that is, the prison industrial complex. It also has a hold on our minds. As Angela Davis argues in Are Prisons Obsolete, "The prison is considered so 'natural' that it is extremely hard to imagine life without it." This is what makes the United States a carceral society. In this service learning course we will take on the monumental and timely task of developing that abolitionist imaginary. We will not be making this journey alone, but will draw on the visions of activists, academics, and currently/formerly incarcerated scholars and artists to guide us. The course has two community partner organizations. With our first community partner, the Ella Baker Center, we will participate in the Prison Mail Night, where we will learn about the real situations of currently incarcerated people and contribute to the procedural abolitionist task of helping people decarcerate themselves. With our second community partner, the Ahimsa Collective, will run weekly transformative justice circles for us to process the contents of the class and to learn a key process in the abolitionist toolkit. Alongside the service learning elements the syllabus is structured in three parts. In the first two weeks we will reflect on the deep history and global geography of the abolitionist struggle, as we can't know where we're going unless we know where we've come from. The middle five weeks will be a whistle-stop tour of current abolitionist struggles, from Abolish ICE to decriminalizing sex work, viewing the broader question of an abolitionist future from the unique issues foregrounded in each struggle. The final three weeks will be dedicated to developing final class projects, which will take the form of speculative artworks which explore the possible future of one abolitionist struggle. This class will be entirely virtual.nnCardinal Course certified by the Haas Center
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ASNAMST 174S: When Half is Whole: Developing Synergistic Identities and Mestiza Consciousness (CSRE 174S, LIFE 174S)

This is an exploration of the ways in which individuals construct whole selves in societies that fragment, label, and bind us in categories and boxes. We examine identities that overcome the destructive dichotomies of ¿us¿ and ¿them, ¿ crossing borders of race, ethnicity, culture, nation, sex, and gender. Our focus is on the development of hybrid and synergistic forms of identity and mestiza consciousness in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

BIO 7N: Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

CEE 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (AMSTUD 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students t more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) and Winter (Y) courses are focused on basic and advanced skills, respectively, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Spring (Z) practicum quarter, which engages teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X and Y are composed of four weekly pedagogical components: (A) lectures; (B) writing prompts linked with small group discussion; (C) lab and self-guided tutorials on the R programming language; and (D) R data analysis assignments. Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu/education.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

CEE 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students t more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Reforming urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) and Winter (Y) courses are focused on basic and advanced skills, respectively, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Spring (Z) practicum quarter, which engages teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X and Y are composed of four weekly pedagogical components: (A) lectures; (B) writing prompts linked with small group discussion; (C) lab and self-guided tutorials on the R programming language; and (D) R data analysis assignments. Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu/education
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
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