2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

191 - 200 of 218 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

PUBLPOL 178: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (CSRE 178P, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 200A: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200B: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Hehmeyer, P. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200C: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Ajami, N. (PI)

PUBLPOL 265F: Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience (CEE 265F)

Adaptation to climate change will not only require new infrastructure and policies but it will also challenge our local, state and national governments to collaborate across jurisdictional lines in ways that include many different types of private and nonprofit organizations and individual actors. The course explores what it means for communities to be resilient and how they can reach that goal in an equitable and effective way. Using sea level rise in the San Francisco Bay Area as a case study, the course assesses grey and green technologies and a range of planning and policy measures that can be used to enhance climate resilience. The course also examines the obstacles communities face in selecting and implementing adaptation measures (e.g., resource constraints, competing priorities, complex permitting requirements and weak inter-agency coordination). Officials from various Bay Area governmental entities contribute to aspects of the course. Course is intended for seniors and graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

PWR 2EE: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Once Upon a Cause: Producing Picture Books for Local Children

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Whether our favorite picture books as kids were timeless classics or new arrivals, whether they scared us or amused us, consoled us or challenged us, they moved and shaped us in profound ways. How could a few dozen pages and a few hundred words affect us so powerfully? Why did we want to hear and see and read our favorite picture books again and again? What was the secret to their magic? In this course you'll not only analyze that "magic" but will also collaborate closely with a group of classmates to create an original, compelling, and educationally appropriate picture book for second-graders in a local school. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Ellis, E. (PI)

PWR 91EE: Intermediate Writing: Saving Lives with Picture Books

Want to help improve the health of mothers and young children in Bangladesh by creating picture books? This is your chance. (No artistic skills required.) You and your classmates will collaboratively create at least one original picture book designed to communicate information about child stimulation, nutrition, water sanitation, hygiene, the dangers of lead, and healthy ways of thinking. You¿ll study the genre of the picture book, explore the culture of Bangladesh, and consult with a team of Stanford-led researchers to create at least one picture book. You¿ll pitch story ideas, create storyboards and dummies, and revise and edit in light of feedback from the team in Bangladesh, as well as some of the mothers participating in the study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ellis, E. (PI)

SOC 11SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (CSRE 10SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. This class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 146: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 167VP: Justice + Poverty Innovation:Create new solutions for people to navigate housing, medical, & debt

How can emerging technologies and human-centered design be used to help people going through problems with housing, medical care, and debt? In this class, we will work with local partners to develop new tech and design prototypes to address poverty-related problems. We will explore new digital solutions, as well as how to use emerging technologies like AI and blockchain. At the same time, we will explore policy and legal reforms that could address root causes of the problems.nnStudents will work in small, interdisciplinary teams with partners organizations in law, medicine, and policy. They will do design research in the field, propose new solutions and test them, and develop new initiatives that will be piloted. The goal is to incubate promising, feasible public interest technology and design projects.nnThe class will be run in parallel to similar classes in Mexico, Guatemala, and Colombia. Students will have the chance to learn about similar innovation efforts in other countries, and will be challenged to think about how their own projects could be replicated and scaled
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints