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51 - 60 of 195 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 248X: Language, Literacy, and Culture (EDUC 248)

This field-based Cardinal Course will provide a unique opportunity to combine theory and practice in the study of language, literacy, and culture in educational settings. It is a collaborative partnership between Stanford (through the Haas Center for Public Service) and the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula. Stanford students will work directly with children enrolled in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program at a youth center in Redwood City.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (URBANST 169)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

EARTH 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Saltzman, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 105: Food and Community: Food Security, Resilience and Equity (EARTHSYS 205)

What can communities do to bolster food security, resiliency, and equity in the face of climate change? This course aims to respond to this question, in three parts. In Part 1, we will explore the most current scientific findings on trends in anthropogenic climate forcing and the anticipated impacts on global and regional food systems. Specifically, Part I will review the anticipated impact of climate change on severe weather events, crop losses, and food price volatility and the influence of these impacts on global and regional food insecurity and hunger. In Part II, we will consider what communities can do to promote food security and equity in the face of these changes, by reviewing the emerging literature on food system resiliency. Finally, we will facilitate a conference in which multi-disciplinary teams from around the country will gather to initiate regional planning projects designed to enhance food system resilience and equity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Limited enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Carlisle, L. (PI)

EARTHSYS 125: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 155: Science of Soils (ESS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fendorf, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 176: Open Space Management Practicum (EARTHSYS 276)

The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the East Bay Regional Parks District. Grass Roots Ecology or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research desig more »
The unique patchwork of urban-to-rural land uses, property ownership, and ecosystems in our region poses numerous challenges and opportunities for regional conservation and environmental stewardship. Students in this class will address a particular challenge through a faculty-mentored research project engaged with the East Bay Regional Parks District. Grass Roots Ecology or the Amah Mutsun Land Trust that focuses on open space management. By focusing on a project driven by the needs of these organizations and carried out through engagement with the community, and with thorough reflection, study, and discussion about the roles of scientific, economic, and policy research in local-scale environmental decision-making, students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research for conservation and open space preservation in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in conservation biology and ecology, community and stakeholder engagement, land use policy and planning, and the practical aspects of land and environmental management.nnAll students must complete the course application and turn it into Rachel Engstrand (rce212@stanford.edu) and Briana Swette (bswette@stanford.edu) by email. To receive priority consideration and an enrollment code, please submit the application by Monday September 10th, 2018. The course application consists of a short paragraph about your background and interest in and preparation for working on a real-world community-engaged earth systems project. The total course enrollment is necessarily limited by the project-based nature of the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 187: FEED the Change: Redesigning Food Systems

FEED the Change is a project-based course focused on solving real problems in the food system. Targeted at upper-class undergraduates, this course provides an opportunity for students to meet and work with thought-leading innovators, to gain meaningful field experience, and to develop connections with faculty, students, and others working to create impact in the food system. Students in the course will develop creative confidence by learning and using the basic principles and methodologies of human-centered design, storytelling, and media design. Students will also learn basic tools for working effectively in teams and for analyzing complex social systems. FEED the Change is taught at the d.school and is offered through the FEED Collaborative in the School of Earth. This class requires an application. For application information and more information about our work and about past class projects, please visit our website at http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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