2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

51 - 60 of 213 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CSRE 248X: Language, Literacy, and Culture (EDUC 248)

This field-based Cardinal Course will provide a unique opportunity to combine theory and practice in the study of language, literacy, and culture in educational settings. It is a collaborative partnership between Stanford (through the Haas Center for Public Service) and the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula. Stanford students will work directly with children enrolled in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program at a youth center in Redwood City.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit

CSRE 260: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, URBANST 169)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

DANCE 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (AMSTUD 197, TAPS 197)

This class uses the lens of performance, and particularly dance, to explore the aesthetic, cultural, historical, and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration and its cultural dimensions. Class readings and discussions foreground the legal and social contexts surrounding prisons in the U.S., Particular attention will be paid to the nexus of art, community, and social action, and how dance might be used to study the performing arts effects on self-construction, perception, experiences of embodiment, and social control for incarcerated teenagers. The class includes guest speakers who bring important perspectives on criminal justice including returned citizens, a juvenile justice attorney, a restorative conferencing facilitator and a dancer who teaches women in prison to be their own dance instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

EARTH 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Saltzman, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 119C: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align wit more »
Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. Please visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

EARTHSYS 125: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

EARTHSYS 155: Science of Soils (ESS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 182A: Ecological Farm Systems

This is project-based course in sustainable agricultural systems. This course typically takes place on the Stanford Educational Farm but this spring, with the current COVID-19 situation and the temporary closure of the farm, it will be an asynchronous online course. Students will work on projects based on their interests with the support of the course teaching team.nnnStudents will work individually or in groups on projects of their choosing. Potential projects include home or community garden development (where possible), independent research, literature reviews, farm system designs, proposals, resource guides, and/or curricula for farm programs. Projects will be scaled so that they can be completed during the quarter and students can work on more than one project. The course application (link below) includes a list of several potential projects and students are welcome to propose their own ideas.nn nnCourse Application Link: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_erBTivsSTI2HLO5
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

EARTHSYS 210A: Senior Capstone and Reflection

The Earth Systems Senior Capstone and Reflection, required of all seniors, provides students with opportunities to synthesize and reflect on their learning in the major. Students participate in guided career development and planning activities and initiate work on an independent or group capstone project related to an Earth Systems problem or question of interest. In addition, students learn and apply principles of effective oral communication through developing and giving a formal presentation on their internship. Students must also take EARTHSYS 210P, Earth Systems Capstone Project, in the quarter following the Senior Capstone and Reflection Course. Prerequisite: Completion of an approved Earth Systems internship ( EARTHSYS 260).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints