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31 - 40 of 213 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Get real-world experience researching and developing your own social impact project! Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Main class components are workshops, community discussions, guest speakers and mentorship. Studio provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their project ideas and Minimum Viable Product prototypes with stakeholders and the public. Application required; please see cs51.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 52: CS + Social Good Studio: Implementing Social Good Projects

Continuation of CS51 (CS + Social Good Studio). Teams enter the quarter having completed and tested a minimal viable product (MVP) with a well-defined target user, and a community partner. Students will learn to apply scalable technical frameworks, methods to measure social impact, tools for deployment, user acquisition techniques and growth/exit strategies. The purpose of the class is to facilitate students to build a sustainable infrastructure around their product idea. CS52 will host mentors, guest speakers and industry experts for various workshops and coaching-sessions. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their projects with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 51, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CS 106S: Coding for Social Good

Survey course on applications of fundamental computer science concepts from CS 106B/X to problems in the social good space (such as health, government, education, and environment). Each week consists of in-class activities designed by student groups, local tech companies, and nonprofits. Introduces students to JavaScript and the basics of web development. Some of the topics we will cover include mental health chatbots, tumor classification with basic machine learning, sentiment analysis of tweets on refugees, and storytelling through virtual reality. Pre/Corequisite: CS106B or CS106X.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 184: Bridging Policy and Tech Through Design (PUBLPOL 170)

This project-based course aims to bring together students from computer science and the social sciences to work with external partner organizations at the nexus of digital technology and public policy. Students will collaborate in interdisciplinary teams on a problem with a partner organization. Along with the guidance of faculty mentors and the teaching staff, students will produce a set of deliverables ranging from policy memos and white papers to data visualizations and software. Possible projects suggested by partner organizations will be presented at an information session on Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:30 pm in Gates 415 - RSVP http://bit.ly/InfoCS184. Following the info session, a course application will open for teams to be selected before the start of Spring Quarter. Students may apply to a project with a partner organization or with a pre-formed team and their own idea to be reviewed for approval by the course staff. Applications close March 20 and successful applicants will be n more »
This project-based course aims to bring together students from computer science and the social sciences to work with external partner organizations at the nexus of digital technology and public policy. Students will collaborate in interdisciplinary teams on a problem with a partner organization. Along with the guidance of faculty mentors and the teaching staff, students will produce a set of deliverables ranging from policy memos and white papers to data visualizations and software. Possible projects suggested by partner organizations will be presented at an information session on Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:30 pm in Gates 415 - RSVP http://bit.ly/InfoCS184. Following the info session, a course application will open for teams to be selected before the start of Spring Quarter. Students may apply to a project with a partner organization or with a pre-formed team and their own idea to be reviewed for approval by the course staff. Applications close March 20 and successful applicants will be notified by Tuesday, March 24th. The course meets twice a week: Once with all students taking the course and a second time with the project-based team mentors. The time below is for the cross-team meetings, as the team meetings will be scheduled according to member availability. Prerequisites: Appropriate preparation depends on the nature of the project proposed, and will be verified by the teaching staff based on your application.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Ullman, J. (PI)

CS 209: Law, Order, & Algorithms (CSRE 230, MS&E 330, SOC 279)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. One concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes statistical techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how anti-discrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. To enroll in the class, please complete the course application by March 20, available at: https://5harad.com/mse330/. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CSRE 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

CSRE 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (ANTHRO 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as more »
As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Hayat, M. (PI)

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

CSRE 146A: Designing Research for Social Justice: Writing a Community-Based Research Proposal (URBANST 123)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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