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21 - 30 of 213 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 277X: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 177X, ENGR 177A, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of CEE 177X/277X, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177S/277S Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

CHILATST 1SI: English Language Learner Tutoring and Curriculum Development

The principal purpose of this course is to support Habla tutors in developing lesson plans and strategies to implement during their tutoring sessions with English language learners. The course equips students with a foundational understanding of English as a second language, practical experience with developing educational materials for language learning, and a collaborative space to reflect on the tutoring experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

CHILATST 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)

CHILATST 177B: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177F, EDUC 177B)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)

CHILATST 198: Internship for Public Service (CSRE 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Marquez, R. (PI)

CHPR 227: The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research (HRP 272)

The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Student more »
The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Students will gain practical experience in various community engagement tools and strategies to help guide the development of a community engagement plan responsive to community needs. Challenges and benefits of establishing community partnerships will be highlighted by real-world examples. nThe course will include lectures; interactive student-led presentations and guided exercises; class discussions among invited speakers, students and instructors; individual and group assignments; and organized small-group and experiential activities. Course readings will demonstrate the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary community engagement approaches and will illustrate how to conduct innovative community-engaged research. nThe Science of Community Engagement course is intended to reach students with diverse research interests, including clinical research, community health, health research and policy, epidemiology, prevention research, environmental health, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Rosas, L. (PI)

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

COMM 138: Deliberative Democracy Practicum: Applying Deliberative Polling (COMM 238)

In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will learn and apply quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in rese more »
In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will learn and apply quantitative and qualitative research methods. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in deliberative democracy, community and stakeholder engagement, and the practical aspects of working in local communities. This practicum is a collaboration between the Center for Deliberative Democracy and the Haas Center for Public Service. CDD website: http://cdd.stanford.edu; Hass Center website: https://haas.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit

COMM 177I: Investigative Watchdog Reporting (COMM 277I)

Graduate students register for COMM 277I.) Learn how to apply an investigative and data mindset to journalism, from understanding how to background an individual or entity using online databases to compiling or combining disparate sets of information in ways that unveil wrongdoing or mismanagement. Focuses on mining texts, tracking associations, and using visualizations. Stories produced apply investigative techniques to beat reporting, breaking news, and long form journalism. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 206: Communication Research Methods (COMM 106)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
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