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171 - 180 of 211 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

OSPCPTWN 70: Youth Citizenship and Community Engagement

Critical thinking about core concepts in community engagement such as community, self, and identity. The course aims to cultivate a critical consciousness about the meaning of charity, caring, social justice and the aims of engagement with communities to enhance self awareness, awareness of others who are different, awareness of social issues, and an ethic of care where students can be change agents. The meaning of youth citizenship as it relates to engagement with communities will be explored.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPGEN 259: Community Health in Oaxaca

Close observation of clinicians at work in community health settings in Oaxaca and service with local community health organizations. Combination of classroom study and discussion with cultural immersion, language training, clinical shadowing, and community service. Topics include: Mexican healthcare system; cultural, socioeconomic and educational factors impacting health of Mexicans and Mexican immigrants to U.S.; Mexican cultural and health beliefs; Mexican migration as a multi-ethnic process.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garcia, G. (PI)

PEDS 211: Medical-Legal Issues in Children's Health

(Same as LAW 643) Explores the link between poverty and children's health and how the medical and legal fields can work together to improve health outcomes for low income children. Weekly class meetings covering medical legal issues such as asthma immigration, health insurance; intake interviews with patient families and analysis of their medical legal issues; group project focused on a medical legal policy issue; final paper cowritten by law and medical students. May be taken for 2 units (weekly 2.5 hour seminar meetings only), 3 units (participation in either intake interviews or policy work) or 4 units (full participation in all course components). Prerequisite: instructor consent. Preference to students committed to full participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

POLISCI 20Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, HISTORY 52Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ehrlich, T. (PI)

POLISCI 75: The 2018 Midterm Election: Making Your Voice Heard

Elections are critical to determining the direction of this country, but how do you get involved in ways beyond voting? How do campaigns work on a practical level? How can students make a difference in the upcoming midterm elections? This class offers an opportunity to gain knowledge of and firsthand experience in an American elections. Course credit is based on classroom time, reading time and time spent on volunteer work. Students in this course will be required to participate in some way in the upcoming US Midterm election. This could mean undertaking one or more activities such as training for and serving as a poll worker, working for groups that are registering voters, or volunteering for a campaign. Students are responsible for finding their election-related opportunity, but they may contact Stephanie Burbank about options and contact information. Once you determine what activity you will be volunteering for, please fill out this form: http://web.stanford.edu/~sburbank/PS75.fb. If you have any questions, please reach out to the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 236: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

POLISCI 236S: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236)

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

PSYC 86Q: Psychology of Xenophobia

What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrati more »
What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrating Islamic spirituality into therapy as a means of addressing the under utilization of mental health services in Muslim populations. A combination of stimulating group discussions, talks by guest speakers, and field trips to community partners will provide students with different perspectives and a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYC 223: Topics in Neurodiversity: Introduction and Advocacy

Topics in Neurodiversity is a quarter course that provides students with the foundation, knowledge, and essential skills for understanding, engaging with, and advocating for the neurodiverse population. Through a combination of academic learning and community engagement students will deepen their understanding about the experiences of and long-term outcomes for neurodiverse individuals in myriad realms including education, employment, law, medicine, social and more. Students will be guided in developing a person-centered, strengths-based and inquiry oriented approach to facilitate direct engagement with neurodiverse individuals and to inform neurodiversity advocacy activities. This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Fung, L. (PI)
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