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151 - 160 of 213 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

LAW 807L: Policy Practicum: The Opioid Epidemic: Developing New Law and Policy Tools

Same as PSYC 107. Client: Broken No More, http://broken-no-more.org/about-us/. More Americans die every year of overdose than died in the entire course of the 1955-75 Vietnam conflict. Overdose has helped reduce aggregate US life expectancy for three years in a row¿something that has not happened in 100 years, including at the height of the AIDS epidemic in the '80s and '90s. Measured by loss-of-life, opiate-related overdose is the most acute national health crisis of our lifetimes. Student researchers will work closely with the client, Broken No More, a national organization of parents and families who have lost family members to opioid use. The organization supports grieving members and also pushes forward evidence-based, public health interventions to the opioid epidemic. This practicum explores legal approaches to a more comprehensive and thoughtful understanding to the Opioid Epidemic. The research team will evaluate whether various stakeholders have fulfilled their legal and re more »
Same as PSYC 107. Client: Broken No More, http://broken-no-more.org/about-us/. More Americans die every year of overdose than died in the entire course of the 1955-75 Vietnam conflict. Overdose has helped reduce aggregate US life expectancy for three years in a row¿something that has not happened in 100 years, including at the height of the AIDS epidemic in the '80s and '90s. Measured by loss-of-life, opiate-related overdose is the most acute national health crisis of our lifetimes. Student researchers will work closely with the client, Broken No More, a national organization of parents and families who have lost family members to opioid use. The organization supports grieving members and also pushes forward evidence-based, public health interventions to the opioid epidemic. This practicum explores legal approaches to a more comprehensive and thoughtful understanding to the Opioid Epidemic. The research team will evaluate whether various stakeholders have fulfilled their legal and regulatory obligations to respond to the epidemic, including whether hospitals and insurers fulfill their implied "duty of care." The questions addressed in this practicum could have life-saving impact on people currently suffering from opioid use disorder. The course seeks to build a diverse research team with students from law, public policy, medicine, public health, and sociology. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 807O: Policy Practicum: Assessing the Impact of China's Global Infrastructure Spending on Climate Change

Client: Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance. China is engaged in massive energy-infrastructure spending around the world. Whether that spending is high-carbon or low-carbon will do much to determine the future of global climate change. One swathe of that spending is known as the Belt and Road Initiative, or BRI. But there's confusion about (1) which Chinese-funded energy-infrastructure projects outside China are part of the BRI and which are not and (2) how Chinese energy-infrastructure spending, both as part of the BRI and beyond it, is affecting the carbon-emissions trajectory in key countries. These are crucial questions as the world crafts policies and financial mechanisms to meaningfully curb carbon emissions. In this policy lab, students will continue research underway at the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance into (1) the opacity of definitions of the BRI and (2) how green or brown Chinese-infrastructure investments are, both in the BRI and outside more »
Client: Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance. China is engaged in massive energy-infrastructure spending around the world. Whether that spending is high-carbon or low-carbon will do much to determine the future of global climate change. One swathe of that spending is known as the Belt and Road Initiative, or BRI. But there's confusion about (1) which Chinese-funded energy-infrastructure projects outside China are part of the BRI and which are not and (2) how Chinese energy-infrastructure spending, both as part of the BRI and beyond it, is affecting the carbon-emissions trajectory in key countries. These are crucial questions as the world crafts policies and financial mechanisms to meaningfully curb carbon emissions. In this policy lab, students will continue research underway at the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance into (1) the opacity of definitions of the BRI and (2) how green or brown Chinese-infrastructure investments are, both in the BRI and outside of it. The work will proceed as case studies of four countries. The initial work has begun to point up two important hypotheses: (1) that, because of the fuzziness of definitions of what constitutes the BRI, analyzing Chinese foreign energy-infrastructure investment writ large is more important than analyzing so-called BRI investment specifically, and (2) that the environmental effect of Chinese energy-infrastructure investments abroad depends more on policies in the host countries than on Chinese policies. These conclusions, illustrated with real-world examples in the four case-study countries, have the potential to reframe Western attitudes toward Chinese energy spending in ways that could promote more international cooperation in battling climate change. The lab seeks two to four graduate students. Law students, business students, engineering and environmental-science students, and students with a focus in East Asia will be eligible. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Ball, J. (PI)

LAWGEN 209Q: Community Police Academy

The Community Police Academy is a combination of classroom instruction and "hands-on" activities that examine life as a police officer. This class looks to clarify and expand the participant's knowledge of the responsibilities, decisions and constraints that face law enforcement officers today, while also providing some perspectives on the national conversation about the role of law enforcement in society. Students can elect to earn two units of credit by completing the readings, short assignments, and attending 4 discussion section meetings, or students may opt to take the course for no credits and only attend the activities. The class is learning opportunity for all involved, an opportunity to build trust and develop partnerships between the Department of Public Safety and the Stanford community. While this course is open to all students throughout the University, the units will not accrue to Law Degree Candidates for credit toward a degree in Law (JD, JSM, JSD, or LLM). Prerequisites: Application and basic background check; minimum 18 years of age.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Wilson, L. (PI)

ME 105: Designing for Impact

This course will introduce the design thinking process and skills, and explore unique challenges of solving problems and initiating action for public good. Design skills such as need-finding, insight development, and prototyping will be learned through hands-on project work with a community partner and a particular emphasis on the elements required to be effective in the social sector. This is a Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center for Public Service. ME101 recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ME 170A: Mechanical Engineering Design- Integrating Context with Engineering

First course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem in theme area of pressing societal need. Learn and utilize industry development process: first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept. Second quarter emphasizes implementation and testing. Learn and apply professional communication skills, assess ethics. Students must also enroll in ME170b; completion of 170b required to earn grade in 170a. Course sequence fulfills ME WIM requirement. Prerequisites: ENGR15, ME80, ME104 (112), ME131, ME123/151. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ME 170B: Mechanical Engineering Design: Integrating Context with Engineering

Second course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem in theme area of pressing societal need. Learn and utilize industry development process: first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept. Second quarter emphasizes implementation and testing. Learn and apply professional communication skills, assess ethics. Students must have completed ME170a; completion of 170b required to earn grade in 170a. Course sequence fulfills ME WIM requirement. Prerequisites: ENGR15, ME80, ME112, ME131, ME123/151. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4

MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice com more »
Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

MED 51Q: Cultivate a Compassionate Presence: An Aging and End-of-Life Care Practicum

This is a Community Engaged Learning Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers.nThe class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing formal volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular hous more »
This is a Community Engaged Learning Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers.nThe class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing formal volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular house calls on patients in their panel, and write progress notes, which will become a part of the patients' electronic medical records. Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults from diverse backgrounds in a respectful and compassionate manner. Students will be taught to discuss their panel of patients in class every week using the standard medical clinical rounds approach. Weekly assignments will help students reflect on their interactions with the patients and lessons they learned. Our goal is to train future leaders in the fields of healthcare, law, sociology, public policy, and humanities in the vital area of aging and end-of-life care for diverse Americans.nPLEASE NOTE: This IntroSem is a Cardinal Course. Students who enroll in MED 51Q will be working directly with patients. As a prerequisite for patient-care, all students (a) must complete TB testing, HIPAA training, patient safety training, and background check; (b) must be able to perform the physical activities required for patient care which includes the ability to frequently stand, walk, twist, bend, stoop, squat and occasionally lift, carry, push, and pull objects that weigh up to 40 pounds and assist patients into their wheelchairs and take them on walks. All tests required will be provided free of cost and have to be completed with specific agencies affiliated with Stanford. Failure to complete paperwork will result in student being dropped from the class. Professor Periyakoil will send more specific directions after students are enrolled in MED 51Q.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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