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141 - 150 of 213 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

INTNLREL 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

INTNLREL 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242, CSRE 142C)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ITALIC 99: Immersion in the Arts

Student-led courses in the arts. Topics change quarterly. Open to ALL students but current ITALIC students and alumni will be given priority.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIC 100: ITALIC Seminar: Notes to a Young Artist

Working with the Haas Center, students in this seminar will create a mini-magazine/online course about art to share with students at a Bay Area high school. You will assemble a list of suggested readings and brief essays on key artistic texts and concepts, as well as images and links to the artistic examples you find most inspiring. You will create a variety of media about these ideas and artists, from illustrated slideshows to video essays or podcasts to short explanatory texts and longer personal essays. The guiding question of the course is: What does a young artist need to know?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Supporting INTERPOL's Efforts to Combat Transnational Crime

Changes in the nature of transnational crime and developments under international law may necessitate adjustments of INTERPOL's policy and legal considerations in three broad areas: (1) online manifestations of support for extremist and terrorist conduct; (2) misinformation and fake new; (3) online incitement of violence and hatred, defamation, harassment, and cyber bullying. This Practicum aims to develop principles for INTERPOL to guide its interpretation and application of Article 3 to capture this new--online--manifestation of transnational crime. More specifically, it aims to establish general guidelines that INTERPOL can rely on in determining whether a request to process information on offenses arguably implicating freedom of expression online is in alignment with its constitutional obligation to remain neutral and adhere to international human rights standards. This Practicum is open to graduate students from law (2L, 3L, and Advanced Degree), business, international policy, co more »
Changes in the nature of transnational crime and developments under international law may necessitate adjustments of INTERPOL's policy and legal considerations in three broad areas: (1) online manifestations of support for extremist and terrorist conduct; (2) misinformation and fake new; (3) online incitement of violence and hatred, defamation, harassment, and cyber bullying. This Practicum aims to develop principles for INTERPOL to guide its interpretation and application of Article 3 to capture this new--online--manifestation of transnational crime. More specifically, it aims to establish general guidelines that INTERPOL can rely on in determining whether a request to process information on offenses arguably implicating freedom of expression online is in alignment with its constitutional obligation to remain neutral and adhere to international human rights standards. This Practicum is open to graduate students from law (2L, 3L, and Advanced Degree), business, international policy, communications, computer science, and other relevant programs. Highly qualified undergraduates are also invited to apply. The practicum meets 9-10:30 on Wednesdays. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 255) in Winter and Spring.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 807C: Policy Practicum: Donor Advised Funds and Their Critics

The donor advised fund (DAF) is an increasingly popular vehicle for charitable giving. Donors receive a tax deduction when they contribute money or appreciated assets to a DAF; at their discretion, donors (DAF "holders") may advise the DAF manager, or "sponsor," to distribute funds to tax-exempt charities. There are about 500,000 individual DAFs across the country, with total assets of over $100 billion. The major DAF sponsors are community foundations and the charitable arms of investment managers like Schwab, Fidelity, and Vanguard. Although donors can only "advise" rather than "direct" a sponsor to make a gift, their advice is almost always heeded. DAFs arguably incentivize giving by providing a vehicle for donating complex assets and reducing a donor's burdens by offloading administrative tasks to the DAF sponsor. Some DAF sponsors also offer advice to enable their DAF holders to give more effectively. Yet DAFs have been criticized on several grounds, and legislation has been intro more »
The donor advised fund (DAF) is an increasingly popular vehicle for charitable giving. Donors receive a tax deduction when they contribute money or appreciated assets to a DAF; at their discretion, donors (DAF "holders") may advise the DAF manager, or "sponsor," to distribute funds to tax-exempt charities. There are about 500,000 individual DAFs across the country, with total assets of over $100 billion. The major DAF sponsors are community foundations and the charitable arms of investment managers like Schwab, Fidelity, and Vanguard. Although donors can only "advise" rather than "direct" a sponsor to make a gift, their advice is almost always heeded. DAFs arguably incentivize giving by providing a vehicle for donating complex assets and reducing a donor's burdens by offloading administrative tasks to the DAF sponsor. Some DAF sponsors also offer advice to enable their DAF holders to give more effectively. Yet DAFs have been criticized on several grounds, and legislation has been introduced (but not enacted) to regulate them. One criticism is that while donors receive the tax deduction immediately upon contributing to a DAF, they can take as long as they wish to make gifts from the DAF, and even pass advisory authority on to their heirs, thus delaying putting the funds into the hands of charities that can use them. (In comparison, foundations are required to spend at least 5 percent of their assets annually.) Another criticism is that gifts made through a DAF can be anonymous, with only the DAF sponsor listed as the donor. (In comparison, gifts and grants by foundations must be reported on publicly available tax returns.) In addition, some DAF sponsors have concerns about requests to make gifts to putative hate groups: how to determine whether an organization falls in this category, and how to respond to the request if it does. At a time when the controversy around DAFs is only likely to grow, this Policy Lab practicum will provide an evidence-based analysis of the pros and cons of various self-reform and regulatory proposals. The research team will focus on understanding the perspectives of the recipients of DAF funding as well as those of DAF sponsors, DAF holders, regulators, and critics. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 807E: Policy Practicum: Redesigning the Venezuelan Judiciary: The Venezuelan Constitutional Crisis

Client: National Assembly of Venezuela, Special Committee for the Defense of the Constitution. Venezuela is undergoing a profound political, humanitarian, and economic crisis. Although a dictatorship currently reigns, reformers have begun to plan for a brighter and more democratic future. Students enrolled in this policy lab will have a unique opportunity to help set the terms of a future Venezuelan democracy (and institutional reforms) via a report to be submitted to the Venezuelan National Assembly, the only remaining democratic institution in the country. The report will inform efforts to create a new Venezuelan judiciary. Specifically, students will spearhead completion of a report designed to explore reforms and improvements to judicial independence, judicial appointments, the workings of the judiciary, and the broader legal system. Students will interact with Venezuelan congressional representatives, human rights experts, and research other countries¿ experiences with judicial re more »
Client: National Assembly of Venezuela, Special Committee for the Defense of the Constitution. Venezuela is undergoing a profound political, humanitarian, and economic crisis. Although a dictatorship currently reigns, reformers have begun to plan for a brighter and more democratic future. Students enrolled in this policy lab will have a unique opportunity to help set the terms of a future Venezuelan democracy (and institutional reforms) via a report to be submitted to the Venezuelan National Assembly, the only remaining democratic institution in the country. The report will inform efforts to create a new Venezuelan judiciary. Specifically, students will spearhead completion of a report designed to explore reforms and improvements to judicial independence, judicial appointments, the workings of the judiciary, and the broader legal system. Students will interact with Venezuelan congressional representatives, human rights experts, and research other countries¿ experiences with judicial reform. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 807H: Policy Practicum: Can Opening Up the Legal Services Market Increase Access to Justice?

Several states --- including California, Arizona and Utah --- are considering or already moving forward with changes to the regulations on who can provide legal services --- regulations that are contained in the Rules of Professional Conduct for each state. These proposed reforms are designed to accelerate innovation in the delivery of legal services, and increase access to justice, in part by allowing technology and people without JDs to play a greater role than they can today. As states consider these reforms, there are many questions around the likely impact of these reforms on consumers and providers of legal services, and the most promising regulatory regime(s). Students will research and write about such questions as: (1) What are some of the most promising models from other industries for protecting consumers from harm, and providing redress? (2) What might an independent regulator that oversees entities that provide legal services look like? (3) What are the most promising inno more »
Several states --- including California, Arizona and Utah --- are considering or already moving forward with changes to the regulations on who can provide legal services --- regulations that are contained in the Rules of Professional Conduct for each state. These proposed reforms are designed to accelerate innovation in the delivery of legal services, and increase access to justice, in part by allowing technology and people without JDs to play a greater role than they can today. As states consider these reforms, there are many questions around the likely impact of these reforms on consumers and providers of legal services, and the most promising regulatory regime(s). Students will research and write about such questions as: (1) What are some of the most promising models from other industries for protecting consumers from harm, and providing redress? (2) What might an independent regulator that oversees entities that provide legal services look like? (3) What are the most promising innovations in states that have experimented with non- lawyer providers and other access to justice initiatives. (4) What lessons can we learn from other contexts, including other countries and other professions (for example the medical context, where nurse practitioners can provide services directly, and people other than physicians can own entities that provide health care)? The client will be one or more of the following non-profits working on these issues: the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System, National Center on State Courts, or Responsive Law. The deliverables will be a set of policy briefs and talking points that will inform the regulatory reform debate. Students from a range of disciplines are very welcome, including undergraduates interested in public policy. We will tentatively meet Tues 4-5, but if that doesn't work for everyone, we can find times to meet during the lunch hour as well. Elements used in grading: Performance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. This practicum continues for two quarters - winter and spring. Only students enrolled in the winter quarter may continue with the project in the spring term. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 807I: Policy Practicum: Tools for Reentry: Practices, Apps, and Services

Client: Various government agencies and nonprofit groups. Formerly incarcerated individuals face a range of personal and institutional challenges in their reentry into broader society. Considerable research and many programs have focused on systems reform and support and social programs to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. But technological tools also have the potential to help lower friction and increase the success of reentry. This policy lab will engage with challenging legal, social, government systems, and technological questions, with opportunities to design and/or implement new tools to aid in the reentry process. We will work with a variety of stakeholders including government organizations and programs, non-profit entities, and legal innovators to prototype and evaluate new technological solutions to facilitate the reentry process and reduce recidivism. This practicum will build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other an more »
Client: Various government agencies and nonprofit groups. Formerly incarcerated individuals face a range of personal and institutional challenges in their reentry into broader society. Considerable research and many programs have focused on systems reform and support and social programs to increase the likelihood of successful reentry. But technological tools also have the potential to help lower friction and increase the success of reentry. This policy lab will engage with challenging legal, social, government systems, and technological questions, with opportunities to design and/or implement new tools to aid in the reentry process. We will work with a variety of stakeholders including government organizations and programs, non-profit entities, and legal innovators to prototype and evaluate new technological solutions to facilitate the reentry process and reduce recidivism. This practicum will build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other and enhance the overall capacity of the research and tool development. We encourage students who are interested in criminal justice, technology for social impact, access to justice, and entrepreneurship and innovation for social good to join us, including upper-division and graduate students from Law, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, MS&E, Public Policy, and the social sciences. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final PROJECT. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 807K: Policy Practicum: The Outlaw Ocean

Client: Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, https://oceansolutions.stanford.edu/. Illegal fishing has long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how this seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. A recent World Resources Institute study estimates that half of illegal marine trading networks come from the Pacific, totaling between 3.7 and 7.2 million tons of fish stolen from fishermen and coastal nations. This policy lab confronts the global environmental, human rights and privacy challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing and forced labor and slavery to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be devel more »
Client: Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, https://oceansolutions.stanford.edu/. Illegal fishing has long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how this seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. A recent World Resources Institute study estimates that half of illegal marine trading networks come from the Pacific, totaling between 3.7 and 7.2 million tons of fish stolen from fishermen and coastal nations. This policy lab confronts the global environmental, human rights and privacy challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing and forced labor and slavery to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be developed and deployed. The research contributes to a pilot project -- The Friends of Ocean Action - led by World Economic Forum leaders who are exploring the nexus of international laws and policies, together with national implementation and enforcement mechanisms, related to governance of the oceans. Effective governance includes cooperation among nations, international seafood companies, nonprofit organizations, and the containment of rogue actors. The Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions serves as the policy client and will connect students with such partners as UN-sanctioned working groups, large seafood companies, and human rights and environmental NGOs. Students will produce policy briefs that will contribute to a comprehensive public report by the Center for Ocean Solutions. The Practicum will target using forums such as the upcoming UN Ocean Conference and UN Ocean Day as a platform to share student results. The practicum seeks law students and graduate and well-qualified undergraduates in such programs as earth systems, computer science, product design, public policy, sociology, and marine biology. Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
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