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141 - 150 of 197 results for: CARDCOURSES::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 105: Designing for Impact

This course will introduce the design thinking process and skills, and explore unique challenges of solving problems and initiating action for public good. Design skills such as need-finding, insight development, and prototyping will be learned through hands-on project work with a community partner and a particular emphasis on the elements required to be effective in the social sector. This is a Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center for Public Service. ME101 recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Benjamin, C. (PI)

ME 170A: Mechanical Engineering Design- Integrating Context with Engineering

First course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem. Projects are based on themes addressing most pressing needs of human society; for 2018-2019 the theme is clean energy. Learn and utilize industry development process; first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept. Second quarter emphasizes engineering analysis, design risk assessment, build, test and iteration. Learn and apply professional communication skills in the areas of speaking, presenting, writing, and listening. This is the first quarter of a 2-quarter course. Students must also enroll in ME 170b; completion of 170b required to earn grade in 170a. Enrollment limited, contact instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 170B: Mechanical Engineering Design: Integrating Context with Engineering

Second course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Working in project teams, design and develop an engineering system addressing a real-world problem. Projects are based on themes, addressing most pressing needs of human society; for 2018-2019 the theme is clean energy. Learn and utilize industry development process; first quarter focuses on establishing requirements and narrowing to top concept, second quarter emphasizes engineering analysis, design risk assessment, build, test and iteration. Learn and apply professional communication skills in the areas of speaking, presenting, writing, and listening. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shorter, A. (PI)

MED 1B: Identity, Power and Privilege in Multicultural Health

An independent study service learning course designed to develop students' understanding of the intersection between identity, power, privilege, and disparities (health, education, environment). Students submit a written reflective term paper based on their experience as staff for the Summer Residential Program as well as their understanding of how constructs of identity, power and privilege impact low-income and underrepresented students in their pursuit of higher education. Prerequisite MED 1A.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 51Q: Cultivate a Compassionate Presence: An Aging and End-of-Life Care Practicum

This is a Community Engaged Learning Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and and their caregivers. nThe class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing formal volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular more »
This is a Community Engaged Learning Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting. Using a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual-cultural framework, students learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and and their caregivers. nThe class has a strong practicum aspect by which students will be trained to cultivate a compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of the patient. After completing formal volunteer training, each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct regular house calls on patients in their panel, and write progress notes, which will become a part of the patients' electronic medical records. Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults from diverse backgrounds in a respectful and compassionate manner. Students will be taught to discuss their panel of patients in class every week using the standard medical clinical rounds approach. Weekly assignments will help students reflect on their interactions with the patients and lessons they learned. Our goal is to train future leaders in the fields of healthcare, law, sociology, public policy, and humanities in the vital area of aging and end-of-life care for diverse Americans.nPlease note: This IntroSem is a Cardinal Course. Students who enroll in MED 51Q will be working directly with patients. As a prerequisite for patient-care, all students (a) must complete TB testing, HIPAA training, patient safety training, and background check by December 20, 2018; (b) must be able to perform the physical activities required for patient care which includes the ability to frequently stand, walk, twist, bend, stoop, squat and occasionally lift, carry, push, and pull objects that weigh up to 40 pounds and assist patients into their wheelchairs and take them on walks. All tests required will be provided free of cost and have to be completed with specific agencies affiliated with Stanford. Failure to complete paperwork by December 20, 2018 will result in student being dropped from the class. Professor Periyakoil will send more specific directions after students are enrolled in MED 51Q.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 159: Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border

Required for students participating in the Community Health in Oaxaca summer program. Introduction to the health literacy and health-seeking behaviors of Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program ( http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 161A: Community Health Advocacy

MED161 Community Health Advocacy is a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service agencies, students will broaden and deepen their understanding of the structural determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Students will participate in weekly activities that support the mission of their placement organization, engage in direct service with clients, and collaborate on the design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly classroom sessions will serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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