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71 - 80 of 83 results for: BIOHOPK

BIOHOPK 284H: Holistic Biology (BIOHOPK 184H)

(Graduate students register for 284H.) For majors and non-majors. Complexity in natural systems is examined from complementary points of view, including scientific, historical, philosophical and literary. Lectures and discussions will focus on the writings of Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck, poetry of Robinson Jeffers and on historical and contemporary works concerning marine and fresh-water systems, resource management and climate change. A group project with individual contributions will be carried out and presented at a symposium. This course will involve a significant amount of creative writing, and it satisfies the Writing in Major requirement for Biology. It is open to all majors and classes. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.

BIOHOPK 285H: Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 185H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on scientific diving and quantitative ecological methods in kelp forests.. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes, and subtidal field techniques. Class projects contribute to long-term monitoring at Hopkins Marine Station. It is recommended (but not required) that students complete the Stanford Scientific Diver Training session, typically offered prior to the start of the course. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; rescue scuba certification and scuba equipment.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5
Instructors: Elahi, R. (PI)

BIOHOPK 287H: Sensory Ecology (BIOHOPK 187H)

(Graduate students register for 287H.) Topics: the ways animals receive, filter, and process information gleaned from the environment, sensory receptor mechanisms, neural processing, specialization to life underwater, communication within and between species, importance of behavior to ecosystem structure and dynamics, impact of acoustic and light pollution on marine animals. Emphasis is on the current scientific literature. The laboratory portion of the class explores sensory mechanisms using neurobiological methods and methods of experimental animal behavior.
Last offered: Winter 2018

BIOHOPK 290H: Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

BIOHOPK 291H: Teaching of Stanford at Sea

Only open to graduate students who are teaching assistants for Stanford at Sea. Provides practical experience in teaching field oceanography and marine biology. Serving as an assistant in a lecture course (five weeks) is coupled with acting as a laboratory teaching assistant on board an oceanographic research vessel during a five-week research cruise with the Stanford at Sea course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 10

BIOHOPK 299H: Advanced Topics in Marine Conservation

Graduate students only. Topics will change from year to year but will include such topics as sustainable fisheries, protected areas, ocean planning, social-ecological systems, dynamic management, sustainable seafood, and impacts of climate change
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Crowder, L. (PI)

BIOHOPK 300H: Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of more »
Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission); J. Watanabe: Marine Ecology (kelp forest ecology and invertebrate zoology).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

BIOHOPK 315H: Career Development for Graduate Students

The course will cover multiple skills required to succeed in graduate school and beyond, including fund raising, publishing, selecting career options, job application and negotiation, and teaching, through lectures, group discussions, and practical excercises.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

BIOHOPK 320H: Physical Biology

Physics, mathematics, and biology are often studies as separate subjects. In this two-week intensive course we will attempt to bring them together in a dynamic combination of lectures and hands on projects. We will draw on the diverse flora and fauna of Monterey Bay for our experimental organisms, and will take advantage of the facilities at Hopkins Marine Station to explore questions at levels ranging from molecules to ecological communities
Last offered: Autumn 2015

BIOHOPK 323H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Last offered: Spring 2019
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