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21 - 30 of 83 results for: BIOHOPK

BIOHOPK 165H: The Extreme Life of the Sea (BIOHOPK 265H)

(Graduate students register for 265H). Lecture course that explores the way marine species live in extreme ocean habitats. We will cover the deepest, hottest, coldest, and shallowest habitats and the biggest, fastest, most fecund, oldest and smallest species. We will focus on the molecular, physiological and ecological adaptations that allow species to thrive in these unusual environments.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | Repeatable for credit

BIOHOPK 166H: Molecular Ecology (BIOHOPK 266H)

(Graduate students register for 266H.) How modern technologies in gene sequencing, detection of nuclear nucleotide polymorphisms, and other approaches are used to gather data on genetic variation that allow measurement of population structure, infer demographic histories, inform conservation efforts, and advance understanding of the ecology of diverse types of organisms.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

BIOHOPK 167H: Nerve, Muscle, and Synapse (BIOHOPK 267H)

(Graduate students register for 267H.) Fundamental aspects of membrane excitability, nerve conduction, synaptic transmission, and excitation-contraction coupling. Emphasis is on biophysical, molecular, and cellular level analyses of these processes in vertebrate and invertebrate systems. Labs on intra- and extracellular recording and patch clamp techniques. Lectures, discussions, and labs. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors Prerequisites: PHYSICS 23, 28, 43, or equivalent; CHEM 31, calculus; or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

BIOHOPK 168H: Disease Ecology: from parasites evolution to the socio-economic impacts of pathogens on nations (BIOHOPK 268H)

(Graduate students register for 268H.) Course will lead participants on a journey through the dynamics of infectious diseases that will start at the smallest level from within-host parasite dynamics and will progressively scale up to parasite evolution, disease ecology, public health policies, disease driven poverty traps and the socio-economic impact of infectious diseases on nations. The course will be organized around case studies, including among the others, schistosomiasis, malaria, cholera and sleeping sickness. Participants will have the opportunity to develop a capstone project.
Last offered: Spring 2017

BIOHOPK 172H: Marine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOHOPK 272H)

(Graduate students register for 272H.) This course incorporates the approaches of experimental ecology, biomechanics (ecomechanics), and physiology to develop an integrated perspective on the factors that govern the structures of marine ecosystems and how environment change, including anthropogenic influences, affects ecosystems' species composition and health. Focus is on rocky intertidal, kelp forest, estuarine, and midwater ecosystems of Monterey Bay. Experimental projects done in the field offer experience in a variety of ecological techniques and in analysis of ecological data. Students will engage in presentation and debates of current topics in marine ecology and conservation. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fulfills WIM in Biology.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 173H: Marine Conservation Biology (BIOHOPK 273H)

(Graduate students register for 273H.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Repeatable for credit

BIOHOPK 173HA: Marine Conservation Biology - Seminar and Discussion Only (BIOHOPK 273HA)

(Graduate students register for 273HA.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.nStudents should enroll in this course if they are only joining the seminar and discussion. Students who will engage in the full course should enroll in BIOHOPK 173H/273H.
Last offered: Spring 2019

BIOHOPK 174H: Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression). Students will use R to explore and analyze locally relevant biological datasets. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Instructors: Elahi, R. (PI)

BIOHOPK 175H: Marine Science and Conservation in a Changing World (BIOHOPK 275H)

Graduate students register for 275H. This hands-on, experiential course provides a broad foundation in marine science, and explores emerging opportunities for innovation in the study of life in the sea. Students are resident at Stanford¿s Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove (90 miles south of main campus) where the diverse organisms and environments of Monterey Bay provide the focus for the course. Class meets daily with lectures, discussions, labs, and field work throughout the day. Three linked concentrations¿each 3 weeks long¿are taught sequentially to address (1) the extraordinary diversity of marine organisms and habitats, (2) the physiology and behavior of marine animals, and (3) the principles of marine ecology. Connecting these concentrations is a weekly seminar-based discussion of topics in marine conservation. This design permits deep concentration on each subject, and places emphasis on discussion, group dialog, individual exploration, and experiential learning. In the final week of the quarter, students complete an individual capstone project of their choosing. This course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16

BIOHOPK 177H: Dynamics and Management of Marine Populations (BIOHOPK 277H)

(Graduate students register for 277H.) Course examines the ecological factors and processes that control natural and harvested marine populations. Course emphasizes mathematical models as tools to assess the dynamics of populations and to derive projections of their demographic fate under different management scenarios. Course objectives will be met by a combination of theoretical lectures, assigned readings and class discussions, case study analysis and interactive computer sessions.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Repeatable for credit
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