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1 - 6 of 6 results for: BIO 84: Physiology

BIO 84: Physiology

The focus of Physiology is on understanding how organisms tackle the physical challenges of life on Earth. This course will provide an overview of animal and plant physiology and teach an understanding of how organisms maintain homeostasis, respond to environmental cues and coordinate behaviors across multiples tissues and organ systems. We will examine the structure and function of organs and organ systems and how those systems are controlled and regulated to maintain homeostasis. Control and regulation requires information as does the ability to respond to environmental stimuli, so we will give special consideration to hormonal and neural information systems. We will also be concerned with the interactions and integration of the activities of the different organ systems we study. Prerequisites: none.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 107: Human Physiology Laboratory (HUMBIO 136)

This laboratory course is active and inquiry based. Aspects of exercise and temperature are explored; however, the specific questions the class tackles differ each quarter. Samples of past questions: Does lactic acid accumulation correlate with exercise fatigue at different exercise and body temperatures? Does palm cooling during exercise mitigate the effect of body temperature on fatigue with or without evaporative cooling? Students participate both as experimenters and as subjects of the experiments in two-person teams. Participants must be in good physical condition, though not necessarily athletes, and must be willing to participate in strenuous exercise routines under adverse environmental conditions. Varsity athletes concurrently participating in a spring sport must consult the instructor before applying. Discussion sessions include student presentations of journal articles, data analyses, and feedback on individual WIM research proposals. By application only, see sites.stanford.edu/bio107humbio136 for the application form. Prerequisite: Bio 84 or HumBio 4A. Satisfies WIM for Biology.nIMPORTANT NOTE: this course meets in Herrin Hall, room 202.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 103: Systems Physiology and Design

Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics.  Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs.  Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: CME 102; PHYSICS 41; BIO 82, BIO 84.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 103B: Systems Physiology and Design

*ONLINE Offering of BIOE 103. This pilot class, BIOE103B, is an entirely online offering with the same content, learning goals, and prerequisites as BIOE 103. Students attend class by watching videos and completing assignments remotely. Students may attend recitation and office hours in person, but cannot attend the BIOE103 in-person lecture due to room capacity restraints.* Physiology of intact human tissues, organs, and organ systems in health and disease, and bioengineering tools used (or needed) to probe and model these physiological systems. Topics: Clinical physiology, network physiology and system design/plasticity, diseases and interventions (major syndromes, simulation, and treatment, instrumentation for intervention, stimulation, diagnosis, and prevention), and new technologies including tissue engineering and optogenetics. Discussions of pathology of these systems in a clinical-case based format, with a view towards identifying unmet clinical needs. Learning computational skills that not only enable simulation of these systems but also apply more broadly to biomedical data analysis. Prerequisites: CME 102; PHYSICS 41; BIO 82, BIO 84. strongly recommended PHYSICS 43. Enrollment with Instructor approval
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 136: Human Physiology Laboratory (BIO 107)

This laboratory course is active and inquiry based. Aspects of exercise and temperature are explored; however, the specific questions the class tackles differ each quarter. Samples of past questions: Does lactic acid accumulation correlate with exercise fatigue at different exercise and body temperatures? Does palm cooling during exercise mitigate the effect of body temperature on fatigue with or without evaporative cooling? Students participate both as experimenters and as subjects of the experiments in two-person teams. Participants must be in good physical condition, though not necessarily athletes, and must be willing to participate in strenuous exercise routines under adverse environmental conditions. Varsity athletes concurrently participating in a spring sport must consult the instructor before applying. Discussion sessions include student presentations of journal articles, data analyses, and feedback on individual WIM research proposals. By application only, see sites.stanford.edu/bio107humbio136 for the application form. Prerequisite: Bio 84 or HumBio 4A. Satisfies WIM for Biology.nIMPORTANT NOTE: this course meets in Herrin Hall, room 202.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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