2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

21 - 30 of 139 results for: BIO ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIO 83: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Introduction to the molecular and biochemical basis of life. Lecture topics include the structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates, energy metabolism, signal transduction, epigenetics and DNA repair. The course will also consider how defects in these processes cause disease. Contact Waheeda Khalfan (wkhalfan@stanford.edu) for logistical questions. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 84: Physiology

The focus of Physiology is on understanding how organisms tackle the physical challenges of life on Earth. This course will provide an overview of animal and plant physiology and teach an understanding of how organisms maintain homeostasis, respond to environmental cues and coordinate behaviors across multiples tissues and organ systems. We will examine the structure and function of organs and organ systems and how those systems are controlled and regulated to maintain homeostasis. Control and regulation requires information as does the ability to respond to environmental stimuli, so we will give special consideration to hormonal and neural information systems. We will also be concerned with the interactions and integration of the activities of the different organ systems we study. Prerequisites: none. Attendance at a discussion section held once a week is mandatory. There will be no exams in the course. For logistical questions about the course, please contact Waheeda Khalfan (wkhalfan@stanford.edu).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 85: Evolution

Understanding evolution is key to understanding the diversity of life on earth. We will be focusing on the fundamental principles of evolutionary biology from natural and sexual selection to the formation of new species. To understand these concepts we will delve into the mechanisms that underlie them. The course will also link these fundamental processes to important contemporary evolutionary topics such as the evolution of behavior, life history evolution, and human evolution. Prerequisites: BIO 60 or 61 or 62 or equivalent; recommended: BIO 82, or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 86: Cell Biology

This course will focus on the basic structures inside cells and how they execute cellular functions. Topics include organelles, membrane trafficking, the cytoskeleton, cell division, and signal transduction. Classic and recent primary literature will be incorporated into lectures with an emphasis on state of the art experimental approaches. Prerequisites: BIO 83 is highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 101: Science for Conservation Policy: Meeting California's Pledge to Protect 30% by 2030 (EARTHSYS 101C)

California has set the ambitious goal of conserving 30% of its lands and waters by the year 2030. In this course, students will develop science-based recommendations to help policymakers reach this '30 by 30' goal. Through lectures, labs, and field trips, students will gain practical skills in ecology, protected area design in the face of climate change, and science communication. Students will apply these skills to analyze real-world data, formulate conservation recommendations, and communicate their findings in verbal and written testimony to policymakers. Prerequisites: BIO 81 or BIO/ EARTHSYS 105 or BIO/ EARTHSYS 111 or instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: McFadden, T. (PI)

BIO 103: Human and Planetary Health (BIO 203, SOC 103)

Two of the biggest challenges humanity has to face - promoting human health and halting environmental degradation - are strongly linked. The emerging field of Planetary Health recognizes these inter-linkages and promotes creative, interdisciplinary solutions that protect human health and the health of the ecosystems on which we depend. Through a series of lectures and case-study discussions, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the 'Planetary Health' concept, its foundation, goals, priority areas of action, methods of investigation, and the most relevant immediate challenges.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 105A: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (EARTHSYS 105A)

The Ecology and Natural History of the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is an upper-division course that aims to help students learn ecology and natural history using a 'living laboratory,' the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. The course's central goal is that, as a community of learning, we examine 'via introductory discussions, followed by hands-on experiences in the field' the scientific basis of ecological research, archaeology, edaphology, geology, species interactions, land management, and multidisciplinary environmental education. The first 10 sessions that compose the academic program are led by the instructors, faculty (world-experts on the themes of each session), and JRBP staff. In addition, this 20-week class (winter and spring quarters) trains students to become JRBP Docents that will join the Jasper Ridge education affiliates community. Completion of both Winter ( BIO 105A) and Spring ( BIO 105B) sequence training program is required to join the Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIO 105B: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (EARTHSYS 105B)

The Ecology and Natural History of the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is an upper-division course that aims to help students learn ecology and natural history using a 'living laboratory,' the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. The course's central goal is that, as a community of learning, we examine 'via introductory discussions, followed by hands-on experiences in the field' the scientific basis of ecological research, archaeology, edaphology, geology, species interactions, land management, and multidisciplinary environmental education. The first 10 sessions that compose the academic program are led by the instructors, faculty (world-experts on the themes of each session), and JRBP staff. In addition, this 20-week class (winter and spring quarters) trains students to become JRBP Docents that will join the Jasper Ridge education affiliates community. Completion of both Winter ( BIO 105A) and Spring ( BIO 105B) sequence training program is required to join the Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

BIO 109A: Building Blocks for Chronic Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

Researchers have come a long way in developing therapies for chronic disease but a gap remains between current solutions and the ability to address the disease in full. This course provides an overview to the underlying biology of many of these diseases and how they may connect to each other. A "think outside of the box" approach to drug discovery is needed to bridge such a gap in solutions, and this course teaches the building blocks for that approach. Could Legoland provide the answer? This is a guest lecture series with original contributions from prominent thought leaders in academia and industry. Interaction between students and guest lecturers is expected. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 109B: Advances in Therapeutic Development: Neuronal Signaling and Immunology (BIOC 109B)

This is a seminar course focused on teaching students about novel research and applications in the fields of neuroscience and immunology. The course will cover topics that range from the neuronal pathways in opioid addiction and the mechanics of pain, to advances in immunotherapy. Students will engage with diverse material from leading neuroscience and cancer immunotherapy experts in the Bay Area. Guest lecturers will visit from both academia and neighboring pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies. Active participation is required. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program, but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints