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1 - 10 of 55 results for: BIO ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIO 7N: Introduction to Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 26N: Maintenance of the Genome

Preference to freshmen. The precious blueprint for life is entrusted to the genomic DNA molecules in all living cells. Multiple strategies have evolved to prevent the deleterious consequences from endogenous DNA alterations and damage from radiation or genotoxic chemicals in the environment. In this seminar you will learn about the remarkable systems that scan cellular DNA for alterations and make repairs to ensure genomic stability. Deficiencies in DNA repair have been implicated in many hereditary diseases involving developmental defects, premature aging, and/or predisposition to cancer. An understanding of DNA repair mechanisms is important for advances in the fields of cancer biology, neurobiology, and gerontology. Background readings, introductory lectures, student presentations, short term paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hanawalt, P. (PI)

BIO 32Q: Neuroethology: The Neural Control of Behavior (HUMBIO 91Q)

Preference to sophomores. Animal behavior offers insights about evolutionary adaptations and this seminar will discuss the origins of the study of animal behavior and its development to the present. How does the nervous system control behavior and how is it changed by behavior? We will analyze and discuss original research papers about the neural basis of behavior. The use and misuse of parallels between animal and human behavior. Possible field trip to observe animals in their natural habitat.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fernald, R. (PI)

BIO 42: Cell Biology and Animal Physiology

Cell structure and function; principles of animal physiology (immunology, renal, cardiovascular, sensory, motor physiology, and endocrinology); neurobiology from cellular basis to neural regulation of physiology. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X (or 31A,B), 33. Recommended: BIO 41; CHEM 35; MATH 19, 20, 21 or 41, 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 42A: Bio Solve-It

Students enrolled in Bio42 lecture and regular discussion sections attend two additional 80 min sections per week. The objective of the course is to help students to solidify basic concepts, identify areas to work on, and apply core concepts learned that week in Bio42 lecture and section. Space is limited, by application only. Co-Requisite: Bio 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 45: Introduction to Laboratory Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human tumor suppressor protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as Guardian of the Genome through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of normal and mutant p53 proteins. Assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, investigate further and identify what could be wrong with the p53 mutants you have been studying. Conduct lab experiments to test hypotheses, analyze data, and present your findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, having taken CHEM 31X, or 31A and B, and 33 and being concurrently enrolled or past enrollment in Biology or Human Biology core will help. Note: This class has a $25 course fee. More information can be found at http://web.stanford.edu/class/bio45
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 46: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using a topic in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Plant Biology as a practical example. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for field- and lab-based data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course focuses on the microorganisms associated with lichen epiphytes. Students, working in teams, develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. In addition, students will learn how to manipulate, visualize and analyze data in R. The capstone of the course is an oral defense of students' findings, as well as a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Labs are completed both on campus and at Jasper Ridge. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 104: Advanced Molecular Biology (BIO 200)

Molecular mechanisms that govern the replication, recombination, and expression of eukaryotic genomes. Topics: DNA replication, DNA recombination, gene transcription, RNA splicing, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein folding. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1. Prerequisite: Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 105A: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (EARTHSYS 105A)

Formerly 96A - Jasper Ridge Docent Training. First of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 109A: The Human Genome and Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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