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1 - 10 of 40 results for: BIO ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIO 3: Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 12N: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 33N: Conservation Science and Practice

Preference to freshmen. This course will explore the potential for harmonizing people and nature, for achieving improved outcomes in the well-being of both as a result of conservation investments and interventions. We will consider biophysical, economic, social, and psychological perspectives, examining an array of conservation goals, from protecting endangered species to securing ecosystem services (such as flood control and climate stability) to alleviating poverty and improving mental well-being. We will also study the design and implementation of real conservation and human development efforts worldwide, among the many farmers, ranchers, fishing people, and others managing Earth's lands and waters. Highlights include a field trip to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford¿s very own nature reserve, and guest visits of some impressive conservation leaders internationally.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Daily, G. (PI)

BIO 34N: Hunger

The biology of hunger and satiety, disease states that disrupt normal responses to hunger and satiety, starvation responses and adaptations to starvation in a variety of organisms, food production and distribution mechanisms, historic famines and their causes, the challenges of providing adequate food and energy for the Earth's growing population, local and global efforts to alleviate hunger, and hunger in fiction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Barton, K. (PI)

BIO 41: Genetics, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology

Emphasis is on macromolecules (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids) and how their structure relates to function and higher order assembly; molecular biology, genome structure and dynamics, gene expression from transcription to translation. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X (or 31A,B), 33. Recommended: CHEM 35; MATH 19, 20, 21 or 41, 42.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 41A: Bio Solve-It

Students enrolled in Bio41 lecture and regular discussion sections attend two additional 80 min sections per week. The objective of the course is to help students to solidify basic concepts, identify areas to work on, and apply core concepts learned that week in Bio41 lecture and section. Space is limited, by application only. Co-Requisite: Bio 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

BIO 44X: Core Molecular Biology Laboratory

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as a tumor suppressor through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of wild type and mutant p53 proteins. Formulate a testable hypothesis and assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, formulate further analyses to determine whether mutant p53 is present in the cell, can bind to DNA, and/or can enter the nucleus. Conduct lab experiments, present findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X, or 31A,B, and 33; concurrent or past enrollment in Biology or Human Biology core. 44X,Y should be taken sequentially in the same year, preferably as sophomores, to prepare for internships. Preference given to juniors and seniors in fall quarter, preference given to sophomores in winter quarter. Prerequisite: BIO 41. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 44Y: Core Plant Biology & Eco Evo Laboratory

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using a topic in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Plant Biology as a practical example. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for field- and lab-based data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and finally writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course will focus on the ecology of oak regeneration at Stanford's nearby Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. Students, working in teams, will develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. The capstone of the course will be an oral defense of students' findings, as well as a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Labs will be completed both on campus and at Jasper Ridge. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 101: Ecology

The principles of ecology. Topics: interactions of organisms with their environment, dynamics of populations, species interactions, structure and dynamics of ecological communities, biodiversity. Half-day field trip required. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4. Prerequisite: 43, or consent of instructor. Recommended: statistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

BIO 110: Chromatin Regulation of the Genome (BIO 210)

Maintenance of the genome is a prerequisite for life. In eukaryotes, all DNA-templated processes are tightly connected to chromatin structure and function. This course will explore epigenetic and chromatin regulation of cellular processes related to aging, cancer, stem cell pluripotency, metabolic homeostasis, and development. Course material integrates current literature with a foundational review of histone modifications and nucleosome composition in epigenetic inheritance, transcription, replication, cell division and DNA damage responses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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