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1 - 10 of 23 results for: ASNAMST

ASNAMST 31N: Perspectives in North American Taiko (MUSIC 31N)

Preference to Freshman. Taiko, or Japanese drum, is a newcomer to the American music scene. Emergence of the first N. American taiko groups coincided with increased Japanese American activism, and to some it is symbolic of Japanese American identity. N. American taiko is associated with Japanese American Buddhism. Musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of taiko. Hands-on drumming. Japanese music and Japanese American history, and relations among performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 52D: Asian American Human Development: Cultural Perspectives on Psychology, Education and Critical Issues (CSRE 52D)

In this course, we will examine the critical issues in Asian American growth and development with particular attention given to current theoretical and research perspectives within a diverse society. We will consider topics related to their cultural identity, cognitive, and socio-emotional development, engaging in the ethnic discourse on Confucian history and culture, Eastern and Western thought and learning, tiger parenting, gender roles, the model minority stereotype, acculturation and bicultural identity, and mental health. This course uniquely integrates the fields of history, education, psychology, human biology, and ethnic studies as we seek to understand the underlying processes of the Asian American person as an individual and as an effective member of the larger society.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 55D: The Asian American Movement: A History of Activism (AMSTUD 155D, ASNAMST 155D, HISTORY 55D, HISTORY 155D)

The "Asian American Movement" was born in the late 1960s inspired by other movements for social change and justice in the era. Activism among Asians in America has a longer history and a continuity to today. We will examine past, present, and future and consider issues of racial/ethnic identity, of inequality, and of injustice. And we will explore avenues that sought remedy and progress. Political, social, cultural, gender and sexuality, and international dimensions will be considered.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 91A: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (ENGLISH 91A)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is `Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

ASNAMST 107: Asian American Leadership: Controversies, Dilemmas, and Decision-Making Strategies

This course examines the experiences of Asian Americans in a variety of contemporary leadership contexts to identify the complexities of race, gender, class, and ethnicity for both understanding and responding to social relations of power. Through seminar discussion, readings, guest speakers, case studies, and experiential activities, students evaluate situated practices of Asian American leadership in consideration of longstanding themes that have animated the field of Asian American Studies: self- and collective identification, representation and equality, community organizing and advocacy, interracial coalition-building, and minority empowerment. Students explore how Asian American leadership is conceptualized, practiced, and assessed in relation to the following contexts: campus and community activism o f the Asian American movement of the 1960s to the present, institutional settings of employment, electoral politics, the field of Asian American Studies, and public intellectual life. A multidisciplinary approach will draw upon anthropology, psychology, political science, sociology, and Asian American Studies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 110: The Development of the Southeast Asian American Communities: A comparative analysis

This course will examine the establishment of the Cambodian, Hmong, and Vietnamese communities in the US. We will focus on the historical events that resulted in their immigration and arrival to the US as well as the similarities and differences in the ways in which they were received. In addition, the course will focus on issues that impacted in the development of these communities focusing on the social, political, and economic processes by which new immigrant groups are incorporated into the American society. The second part of the course will be devoted to analyzing contemporary issues including but not limited to: class status, educational attainment, ethnic identity, racialization, second generation, mass media representation, poverty, and economic mobility.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Do, H. (PI)

ASNAMST 112: Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (ANTHRO 112, ANTHRO 212)

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Summer 2014 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 118A: Digital Heritage: Bringing the Past Online with the Chinese American Historical Museum (ANTHRO 118A, CSRE 118A)

Interpreting the past is no longer just for people like historians and archaeologists, and it¿s no longer confined to the pages of books. More and more, community-based organizations are gathering stories and perspectives from everyday people, and they¿re putting them out for the world to see online. With these big changes, what will be the future of thinking about the past? In this course, students will work through the dynamics of digital heritage through readings, discussion, and original research. The course centers around artifacts unearthed at the Market Street Chinatown in San Jose. Each student will analyze and gather stories relating to a single artifact in order to contribute to a multimedia exhibit for the Chinese American Historical Museum in San Jose. Class time will be devoted both to discussion and to work on artifact-based projects, and will also include a fieldtrip to the museum and collaboration time with members of the Chinese Historical and Cultural Project.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ASNAMST 123: Asian Americans and Environmental Justice (EARTHSYS 123)

One central tenet of the environmental justice movement is centering the leadership of frontline communities. Unfortunately, the struggles of Asian Americans on the frontlines of corporate environmental pollution and extraction are less visible and less well-known. In this course, we will explore the Asian American voices that have contributed to the development of the environmental justice movement and the leadership that is shaping the future of this movement.nThis course is designed to provide students with education about the history of the environmental justice movement, the future being envisioned, and the strategies that are needed to get to the vision. It will draw on lectures, readings, guest presentations, case studies, and the instructor's more than 15 years of experience with organizing and social justice campaigns. Students will learn about the principles guiding the environmental justice movement; the vision and framework of how we achieve a just transition to a regenerative economy; the process of organizing and campaign work to advance a community agenda; and skills in collecting, analyzing, and communicating information.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 144: Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class (CSRE 144, FEMGEN 144X)

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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