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1 - 10 of 15 results for: ASNAMST

ASNAMST 31N: Behind the Big Drums: Exploring Taiko (MUSIC 31N)

Preference to Freshman. Since 1992 generations of Stanford students have heard, seen, and felt the power of taiko, big Japanese drums, at Admit Weekend, NSO, or at Baccalaureate. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to get behind the big drums, literally and academically. In fact, taiko is a relative newcomer to the American music scene. The contemporary ensemble drumming form, or kumidaiko, developed in Japan in the 1950s. The first North American taiko groups emerged from the Japanese American community shortly after and coincided with increased Asian American activism. In the intervening years, taiko has spread rapidly into other communities, most surprisingly to the UK, Europe, Australia, and South America. What drives the power of these drums? In this course, we explore the musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of taiko through readings and discussion, by playing the drums, workshopping with taiko masters, and meeting members of the taiko community. With North American taiko as the focal point, we learn about Japanese music and Japanese American history, and explore relations between performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 91A: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (AMSTUD 91A, CSRE 91D, ENGLISH 91A)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

ASNAMST 100: Intro to Asian American Studies

What is meant by the term Asian American? How have representations of Asian Americans influenced concepts of US citizenship and belonging? What are the social and political origins of the Asian American community? This course provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Asian American studies. Drawing on historical, creative, and scholarly texts, the course examines the history and possibilities of Asian American community. To do this, we place the Asian American experience within a transnational context, paying particular attention to the ways that Asian American lives have been shaped by the legacies of US wars in Asia and by the history of US racism. In the process, we examine the role that representations of Asian Americans have played in shaping the boundaries of US citizenship and belonging. Throughout the course, we utilize our discussions of Asian American racialization and community formation to think critically about the social and political ramifications that the designation Asian American entails.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ASNAMST 110: The Development of the Southeast Asian American Communities: A comparative analysis

This course will examine the establishment of the Cambodian, Hmong, and Vietnamese communities in the US. We will focus on the historical events that resulted in their immigration and arrival to the US as well as the similarities and differences in the ways in which they were received. In addition, the course will focus on issues that impacted in the development of these communities focusing on the social, political, and economic processes by which new immigrant groups are incorporated into the American society. The second part of the course will be devoted to analyzing contemporary issues including but not limited to: class status, educational attainment, ethnic identity, racialization, second generation, mass media representation, poverty, and economic mobility.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Do, H. (PI)

ASNAMST 115: Asian American Film and Popular Culture (AMSTUD 115)

Tracing the evolution Asian American cultural representations from the silent film era through the advent of online media, this course examines the economic, political, and cultural influence of Asian American screen images on U.S. society. Through a focus on both mainstream and independent productions, we discuss the work of Asian American actors, audience members, media producers, consumers, and activists. Films and TV shows to be discussed include The Cheat (1915), Shanghai Express (1932), Flower Drum Song (1961) Fall of the I Hotel (1983), Who Killed Vincent Chin? (1989), TV episodes of the Mindy Project and Master of None, work by early Asian American YouTube stars including Michelle Phan and KevJumba, and Crazy Rich Asians (2018).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

ASNAMST 117D: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film (AFRICAAM 117J, AMSTUD 117, CSRE 117D, FEMGEN 117F)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and analytical frameworks necessary to critically understand constructions of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary American film. Through a sustained engagement with a range of independent and Hollywood films produced since 2000, students analyze the ways that cinematic representations have both reflected and constructed dominant notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States. Utilizing an intersectional framework that sees race, gender, and sexuality as always defined by one another, the course examines the ways that dominant notions of difference have been maintained and contested through film in the United States. Films to be discussed include Coco, Get Out, Moonlight, Mosquita y Mari, and The Grace Lee Project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

ASNAMST 118S: Family Stories: Uncovering Histories of Identity and Difference (AFRICAAM 118X, AMSTUD 118, CSRE 118S)

This course examines family history as a site for understanding identity, power, and social difference in American society. Focusing in particular on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality, we approach the family as an archive through which we might write alternative histories to the ones that dominate the national historical consciousness. To do this, we examine memoirs, oral histories, and first-person documentaries as historical texts that can be used to foreground marginalized historical voices. Students will then be asked to apply course readings and theories to their own family histories as a means of better understanding issues of identity and difference.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

ASNAMST 125A: Archaeological Field Survey Methods (ARCHLGY 125, ARCHLGY 225)

Practicum applying a variety of survey techniques to discover, map, and record archaeological sites. Basic cartographic skills for archaeologists and an introduction to GIS tools, GPS instruments, and geophysical techniques. Participants should be able to walk 3 - 4 miles over uneven terrain or make special arrangements with the instructor for transportation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 127SI: Revolution and the Pilipinx Diaspora: Exploring Global Activism in Local Communities (CSRE 27SI)

This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to not only learn about current issues in the local Filipino American community, but also develop their own plans to take action on social justice issues. Through mediums of art and reflection, we will explore themes of diaspora and liberation by focusing on the Filipino experience and the local and vocal histories of activism in the Bay Area. We will be connecting local histories to the current global narrative while also connecting our past to our own identity formation as activists and community leaders. In doing so, we hope to explore the implications of local activism within the greater context of global organizing. The course will expose students to local community leaders and ways in which they can support and plug in to local initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

ASNAMST 144: Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class (CSRE 144, FEMGEN 144X)

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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