2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

51 - 60 of 125 results for: ARTSTUDI

ARTSTUDI 161: Catalysts for Design

Nature and science as sources of design inspiration. Projects in natural pattern formation, biological growth and form, Fibonacci numbers and the golden section, planar and spatial symmetry, mechanics, chaos, and fractals. Emphasis is on importance of creative synthesis to the design process. Projects take the form of physical constructions as opposed to renderings or computer models. Field trips. (lower level)
Last offered: Autumn 2006

ARTSTUDI 162: Embodied Interfaces

Our computers, phones and devices ¿see¿ us predominately as fingers and single eyes staring at screens. What would happen if our technology acknowledged more of our rich physical presence and capabilities in its design? How have artists and designers used different sensing technologies to account for more of our embodied selves in their works? In this studio course we will explore various sensing technologies and design pieces that engage our whole selves. Interfaces explored will range from the practical to the poetic. Sensors may involve flex sensors, heat sensors, microphones and simple camera tracking technology. We will analyze different tools for their appropriateness for different tasks and extend them through our designs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Mendoza, N. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 163: Drawing with Code

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 164: DESIGN IN PUBLIC SPACES

How does our design of public spaces and elements of our built environment influence and control people¿s movements and expressions in these spaces? Can re-designing a trashcan or a stairway change how people throw away their trash or use the stairs? What are the principles of democracy, surveillance, or personal expression at stake in our current shared spaces? How have artists and designers used their skills to question or re-direct people¿s behavior in these public spheres, or in other spheres of shared cultural heritage? Strategies include re-designing components of the built environment, but also other strategies of intervention, tactical media and reality hacking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Miller, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 165: Social Media and Performative Practices

How can social media, mobile applications, or other more traditional media be used to engage people in new social situations? Could you design an app that gets people to talk with strangers (Miranda July), or a poster that causes a revolt in an office space (Packard Jennings), or a truck that changes how people think about nursing mothers (Jill Miller)? What about platforms that encourage political dialog or social changes? This studio course examines how contemporary artists and designers engage people in a process of social dialog, critique and political change through the existing media and non-traditional art practices.nnWith the constant development of new apps and social media platforms and the pressure from society of everyone having an online presence, the class will investigate and focus specifically on how these tools can be used as a resource to create and present artworks creatively. The students in this class will be introduced to a variety of artwork examples and study different artist¿s approach to media, technically as well as conceptually. Experimentation is highly emphasized throughout this course, as the goal is for the students to create and produce works that uses social media in new ways to tell stories, connect with, mystify or surprise the audience.nnA selection of software such as Photoshop, Premiere Pro, After Affects, and other tools will be introduced in class that will assist the students in producing work for the required assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Miller, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 166: Design in Motion

Design areas for which movement and transformation are essential. Experimentation with mechanical means such as linking, hinging, inflating, and rotating. Projects in lighting, automata, tools and utensils, chain reactions, toys and games, festival props, and quasi-architecture emphasize the creation of works in which motion is a significant agent for aesthetic gratification. No experience in mechanical engineering required. (lower level)
Last offered: Autumn 2007

ARTSTUDI 167: Introduction to Animation

Projects in animation techniques including flipbook, cutout/collage, stop-motion such as claymation, pixilation, and puppet animation, rotoscoping, and time-lapse. Films. Computers used as post-production tools, but course does not cover computer-generated animation. (lower level)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Miyazaki, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 168: Data as Material

How can data be used as ¿material¿ in art and design projects. Beyond straight-forward ideas of ¿data-visualization¿, this studio course seeks to investigate how we construct meaning from sets of information, and how the construction of those sets determines the meaning itself. This course also investigates different display aesthetics and how this is also a strategy for generating meaning. Artists studied include those who use various forms of personal, public, and social data as part of their practice. Historical examples from conceptual artists and other genres are considered along with contemporary artists working with data in digital or hybrid digital/physical formats.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ulfeldt, A. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 170: Photography I: Black and White

Through film and dark room instruction, students learn to use a SLR 35-mm camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed). They develop an awareness of light and its various properties and possibilities. Students become familiar with black and white darkroom techniques creating contact sheets and to evaluating prints, make corrections and re-print. They acquire essential knowledge of historical and contemporary black and white art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 170S: Introduction to Photo: Summer

Critical, theoretical, and practical aspects of creative photography through camera and lab techniques. Field work. Cantor Art Center and Art Gallery exhibitions. Course requires the use of a 35mm camera. The Department will supply if necessary. Summer. (lower level)
Last offered: Summer 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints