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11 - 20 of 37 results for: ARTSTUDI ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARTSTUDI 168: Data as Material

How can data be used as material in art and design projects. Beyond straight-forward ideas of data-visualization, this studio course seeks to investigate how we construct meaning from sets of information, and how the construction of those sets determines the meaning itself. This course also investigates different display aesthetics and how this is also a strategy for generating meaning. Artists studied include those who use various forms of personal, public, and social data as part of their practice. Historical examples from conceptual artists and other genres are considered along with contemporary artists working with data in digital or hybrid digital/physical formats.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 169: Virtual Reality: the possibility and peril of immersive artwork

How can we use virtual reality systems to create powerful, beautiful and socially engaged artworks? Is it possible to use technically sophisticated (and sometimes frustrating) tools to share our unique personal visions? What can working in virtual reality teach us about our embodied reality and sense of presence? How might we question the hype and techno-utopianism surrounding VR, by using the medium itself? What is left out of the current conversation around VR that you would like to explore?nnIn this introductory studio art course, students will learn to create artworks using virtual reality systems. We will use the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, and Daydream VR headsets, as well as more accessible phone-based augmented reality systems to explore this medium. Through lectures and research presentations, we will familiarize ourselves with the artistic history of VR - from foundational works from the 1990¿s through current examples - in order to inform our own work. nnStudents will become fami more »
How can we use virtual reality systems to create powerful, beautiful and socially engaged artworks? Is it possible to use technically sophisticated (and sometimes frustrating) tools to share our unique personal visions? What can working in virtual reality teach us about our embodied reality and sense of presence? How might we question the hype and techno-utopianism surrounding VR, by using the medium itself? What is left out of the current conversation around VR that you would like to explore?nnIn this introductory studio art course, students will learn to create artworks using virtual reality systems. We will use the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, and Daydream VR headsets, as well as more accessible phone-based augmented reality systems to explore this medium. Through lectures and research presentations, we will familiarize ourselves with the artistic history of VR - from foundational works from the 1990¿s through current examples - in order to inform our own work. nnStudents will become familiar with the fundamental studio art practice of analyzing and critiquing their own and others¿ projects. Learning to analyze artwork in turn helps students create works with more emotional and conceptual impact. nnWhile there are no official prerequisites for this course, familiarity with any kind of scripting language or coding environment will be helpful as Unity will be used as the main authoring environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 170: Photography I: Black and White

Through film and dark room instruction, students learn to use a SLR 35-mm camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed). They develop an awareness of light and its various properties and possibilities. Students become familiar with black and white darkroom techniques creating contact sheets and to evaluating prints, make corrections and re-print. They acquire essential knowledge of historical and contemporary black and white art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 171: PHOTOGRAPHY I: DIGITAL

Through digital instruction, students learn to use a DSLR camera and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They become familiar with basic scanning techniques (appropriated images, not negatives) on a flatbed scanner, and basic digital printing (in color). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. They are taught to operate 17¿-wide Epson digital printers, to print digital proof sheets, and to evaluate prints, correct files and re-print. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 173E: Cell Phone Photography

The course combines the critical analysis of cell phone photography with the creation of photographic art works that explore this specific medium's experimental, social and documentary potential. The increasing ubiquity of cell phone photography has had a widespread impact on the practice of photography as an art form. We will consider and discuss the ways in which the platforms of cell phone photography (Instagram, Snapchat) are democratizing image-making and transforming notions of authorship and subjectivity to an unprecedented extent, but also how the use of new technological tools help expand notions of creativity and aesthetic standards.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Peck, S. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 174: Interdisciplinary Animation

There is no medium or form of study that animation cannot touch and expand ¿ it is interdisciplinary. At its core, animation enables the practitioner to find inherent life in materials and thereby transform them. Structured in-class experiments cover foundational animation techniques and expand previously held definitions of animation. Regular screenings introduce students to a wide array of animation practice. Students will work experimentally to find and open their own doorway into animation, creating a personal project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

ARTSTUDI 177: Video Art I

Students create experimental video works. Conceptual, formal, and performance-based approaches to the medium. The history of video art since the 70s and its influences including experimental film, television, minimalism, conceptual art, and performance and electronic art. Topics: camera technique, lighting, sound design, found footage, cinematic conventions, and nonlinear digital editing. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Jackson, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 179: Digital Art I

Contemporary electronic art focusing on digital media. Students create works exploring two- and three-dimensional, and time-based uses of the computer in fine art. History and theoretical underpinnings. Common discourse and informative resources for material and inspiration. Topics: imaging and sound software, web art, and rethinking the comptuer as interface and object. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Odell, J. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 230: Interdisciplinary Art Survey

This course is designed to develop diversity of concepts and strategies within the student's artistic practice. The course includes a survey of artists using different media taught in the department's studio program such as painting, drawing, video and digital art, printmaking, photography, and sculpture. This seminar-style class seeks to expand the artistic practice outside of traditional media boundaries and focuses on the translation of concepts across various media. Art Practice majors and minors only. (upper level)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4

ARTSTUDI 246: Individual Work: Drawing and Painting

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory studio course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. $100 Lab Fee. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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