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51 - 60 of 187 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 263B: The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape

Both cars and the landscape are fundamental to American identity. This seminar will consider the relationship between them: how they have shaped each other, how one mediates the experience of the other, and how American artists such as Ansel Adams, Edward Hopper, and Ed Ruscha have represented both. We will discuss the relationship between nature and technology; the aesthetics of highways and parkways; the phenomenology of driving and road trips; maps and way finding; and the future of cars, mapping, and the landscape.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 264A: Picturing the Cosmos

This seminar explores the place of images in how we understand and imagine the universe. The course draws on art, science, and popular culture, and pays particular attention to the ways they inform each other. Examples include: star maps, science fiction films, appropriated astronomical images, and telescopic views of stars, planets, and nebulae. Using these representations as well as accompanying readings we will discuss the importance of aesthetics for conceptions of the cosmos; the influence of technology on representations; strategies for representing concepts that exceed the limits of human vision; and the ways that views of the universe reflect and shape their cultural context. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 278: Anatomy of Exhibition

This course provides students with the opportunity to research, write the exhibition texts, design, and install an exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center of paintings, prints, and drawings by African American artist Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000). An influential force in 20th-century art, Lawrence captured the trials and triumphs of the black experience. The works are a recent gift to the Cantor that have only rarely been exhibited up to now.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mitchell, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the ¿black box¿ of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores ¿museum cultures¿: representations of ¿self¿ and ¿other¿ within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 289A: Making the Masterpiece in Song Dynasty China (ARTHIST 489A)

Studies of canon formation involving Song Dynasty (10-13th c.) Chinese works of painting, calligraphy, ceramics, and architecture. The roles of early art writing and criticism; collecting histories; art historical theory; / copying, imitation, and reproductive practices; period and regional taste; and modern museological and art historical discourses in identifying and constructing a canon of Song masterworks.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 294: Writing and the Visual

The course examines how various forms of writing and description--from wall labels to scholarly texts¿shape the history and perception of visual objects. Through concrete examples, we will analyze the limits of language in describing visual images and consider how those limits might be expanded or redrawn. Required course for Art History majors.WIM Course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 302: Empire and Aftermath: Greek Art from the Parthenon to Scopas (ARTHIST 102, CLASSICS 162)

The class begins with the art, architecture and political ideals of Periclean Athens, from the emergence of the city as the political and cultural center of Greece in 450 to its defeat in the Peloponnesian War in 404. It then considers how Athens and the rest of Greece proceed in the fourth century to rebuild their lives and the monuments that define them. Earlier artistic traditions endure, with subtle changes, in the work of sculptors such as Kephisodotos. Less subtle are the outlook and output of his son Praxiteles. In collaboration with Phryne, his muse and mistress, Praxiteles challenged the canons and constraints of the past with the first female nude in the history of Greek sculpture. His gender-bending depictions of gods and men were equally audacious, their shiny surfaces reflecting Plato¿s discussion of Eros and androgyny. Scopas was also a man of his time but pursued different interests. Drawn to the inner lives of men and woman, his tormented Trojan War heroes and victims are still scarred by memories of the Peloponnesian War, and a world away from the serene faces of the Parthenon. His famous Maenad, a devotee of Dionysos who has left this world for another, belongs to the same years as Euripides¿ Bacchae and, at the same time, anticipates the torsion and turbulence of Bernini and the Italian Baroque. In the work of these and other fourth century personalities, the stage is set for Alexander the Great and his conquest of a kingdom extending from Greece to the Indus River. (Formerly CLASSART 102)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 306: Byzantine Art and Architecture, 300-1453 C.E. (ARTHIST 106, CLASSICS 171)

(Formerly CLASSART 106/206.) This course and its study trip to the Getty (Los Angeles) to view the new Byzantine exhibition explores the art and architecture of the Eastern Mediterranean: Constantinople, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Antioch, Damascus, Thessaloniki, and Palermo, 4th-15th centuries. Applying an innovative approach, we will probe questions of phenomenology and aesthetics, focusing our discussion on the performance and appearance of spaces and objects in the changing diurnal light, in the glitter of mosaics and in the mirror reflection and translucency of marble.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 306B: What Do Medieval Images Want? Theories of the Image in Byzantium, Islam, and the Latin West (ARTHIST 106B)

What is an image? The medieval response was tied to religious identity. At the core of the debate was whether the image was just a mimetic representation or a living entity: matter imbued with divine spirit. Byzantium, Islam, and the Latin West each developed their own positions and used it as a platform for political legitimacy. We will study the development of the medieval image theories by focusing on specific monuments and objects and by reading both primary sources in translation and current scholarly interpretations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 311: Introduction to Italian Renaissance, 1420-1580 (ARTHIST 111)

New techniques of pictorial illusionism and the influence of the humanist revival of antiquity in the reformulation of the pictorial arts in 15th-century Italy. How different Italian regions developed characteristic artistic cultures through mutual interaction and competition.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hansen, M. (PI)
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