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41 - 50 of 187 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 203: Greek Art In and Out of Context (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar considers Greek artifacts in the context of Greek life (including the life of the workshop), and the endless ways in which craftsmen served the needs of Greek society. Their foundries, factories and ceramic studios produced the material goods that defined Greek life: temples, statues and other offerings for the gods; arms and armor for warriors; sporting equipment and prizes for athletes; houses, clothing and crockery for the family; ships and sailcloth, wagons and ploughs, wine and oil-presses for a thriving domestic and overseas economy; gravestones and funeral vases for the dead. (Formerly CLASSART 109.) nMost of the antiquities exhibited in museums, or purchased by private collectors from galleries and auction houses, survive because they were buried with people who used and cherished them. The Greeks¿ belief that the artifacts they valued in life would serve them in the afterlife informs the second part of the seminar, which is devoted to the recent history of tomb looting and the illicit trafficking in antiquities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 207C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208: Hagia Sophia (CLASSICS 173)

By employing a methodology based in psychoacoustics, semiotics, and phenomenology, this course explores the relationship among sound, water, marble, meaning, and religious experience in the sixth-century church of HagianSophia built by emperor Justinian in Constantinople. We will read medieval sources describing the interior and ritual, make short movies exploring the shimmer of marble in buildings on campus, and study the acoustics of domed buildings through computer auralization done at Stanford's CCRMA (Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208B: The Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews

The seminar and its study trip explore the hybrid character of the art of Medieval Spain between the sixth and the fifteenth centuries. Rather than strictly chronological, our exploration of the artistic production of Muslims, Jews, and Christians is structured around major topics such as imperial power, pilgrimage, word and image. The readings juxtapose historical studies of specifically Spanish sites and objects with theoretical approaches tied to the broader themes.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208C: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium (ARTHIST 408C, CLASSICS 175, MUSIC 208C, MUSIC 408C, REES 208C, REES 408C, RELIGST 208C, RELIGST 308C)

Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium". This year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), nine leading scholars in the field share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers. The goal is to develop a new interpretive framework for the study of religious experience and assemble the research tools needed for work in this interdisciplinary field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 212: Renaissance Florence, 1440-1540

Notions of cultural superiority in light of changes in Florentine society as it went from being a republic to a duchy ruled by the Medici. Artists and architects such as Donatello, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Michelangelo, and Pontormo praised as having revived the arts and returned them to a level of ancient splendor. The role of the sacred in daily life and uses of the pagan past for poetic and scholarly expressions and as vehicles for contemporary experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hansen, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 213: Renaissance Print Culture: Art in the Cantor Arts Center

The seminar takes place in the Cantor Arts Center and provides a unique opportunity to study original works of art from the museum's storage. Beginning in the fifteenth century new techniques of reproduction changed the pictorial culture of Europe. Some engravings called attention to the engraver's virtuosity, and the private nature of the medium was explored for erotic imagery. By the sixteenth century printed images were used for political and religious propaganda during the societal upheavals.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 214: From the Pantheon to the Capitol: Architecture, Cosmology, Mathematics and Illusion (SIW 214)

This course traces the history of the dome over two millenia, from temples to the gods to Temples of the State, and from cosmic archetype to architectural fetish. The narrative interweaves the themes of the dome as image of the Cosmos, religious icon, national landmark, and political monument. It examines the dome not only as a venue for structural innovation, but also metaphysical geometry and transcendent illusionism.nIndividual case studies will familiarise you with major architects from Hadrian to Richard Rogers and historical milestones from the Dome of the Rock to the Capitol in Washington DC. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 217B: Architectural Theory from Antiquity to Le Corbusier (ARTHIST 417B)

This seminar focuses on themes and theories in architectural design from antiquity until the early twentieth century. Modern and contemporary architecture has often claimed its modernity through the incorporation of theory, but this seminar examines selections from key texts that have also moulded architectural and urbanistic thought in the ancient, medieval, and early modern eras in combination with analytical comparisons of built architecture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 225: Cezanne

This seminar will study the complexity and richness of pictures made by Paul Cézanne that affected the course of modernist painting during the early twentieth century. Usually called an Impressionist, Cézanne shares only partially Monet's concern for fleeting effects, and he evokes little of Renoir¿s charm. He did not paint the bustle of city life like Manet or Degas. Cézanne spent most of his career near his hometown of Aix-en-Provence painting landscapes, a few local residents, and many still-lifes. Yet Matisse was serious when he said, "Cézanne, you see is a sort of god of painting. Dangerous his influence? So what? Too bad for those without the strength to survive it." The seminar will explore the foundations of that influence.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marrinan, M. (PI)
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