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241 - 250 of 296 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 432: Rethinking American Art

A re-examination of American art of the 18th and 19th centuries, focusing on works in the collection of the de Young Museum, San Francisco. The class will meet weekly at the de Young, where we will be joined by Professor Margaretta Lovell and students from the University of California, Berkeley. Each student will pursue an in-depth study of a single work in the Museum's superb American collections, using documents of social and cultural history. We will pay particular attention to recent scholarship, questions of genre (landscape, portrait, still life and images of everyday life), and the "biography of objects" (the way works of art shift in context and interpretation over time).nGraduate seminar open to advanced undergraduates with the instructor¿s approval.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 440: Millennium Approaches: The Art of the 1990s (ARTHIST 240)

This seminar will examine the art historical legacy of the 1990s, the decade of Bill Clinton, Beavis and Butthead, and Y2K. By placing art in conversation with music, popular culture, and political events, we will explore the dark underbelly of the decade's facade of sunny optimism. Key topics will include the the end of the Cold War, multiculturalism, American interventionism, the AIDS crisis, and early internet culture. Artists covered will include Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Kim Gordon, Mike Kelly, the Young British Artists, Gregg Bordowitz, Lorna Simpson, Zoe Leonard, Byron Kim, and Glenn Ligon. What is the relationship between art, popular culture, and history? How did the 1990s help shape our current culture?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 440A: The Art Market

This seminar is designed to examine aspects of the art market in the current moment and since the mid 19th century. Participants will have an opportunity to engage with problems and perspectives that, until recently, have generally been overlooked or marginalized in narratives of the history of art. Each week, students will write a response to the readings to be shared in advance of the class meeting, and each week, discussion will be initiated by a different student. In individual research projects culminating in a seminar paper, students will be encouraged to focus on how the art market may have impacted the production, reception, and/or circulation of a work or works by a particular artist. 
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 441: Overlooked/Understudied

This seminar focuses on overlooked artists and understudied artworks in the U.S. from the late 19th century to the present. Rather than reclaiming marginality for its own sake, we will consider how the practice of looking at the overlooked art changes familiar narratives of canonical art.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2019 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 442: Art History in the First Person

Course Description: This seminar considers the use of the first person voice in a wide range of writings about art, from fiction to criticism to scholarship. Insofar as graduate students have typically been discouraged from using the first person voice in their scholarly work, we will question the benefits and drawbacks of doing so in particular cases. To what ends have different writers put the first person voice and how do they integrate it with others strategies of written expression? How might we distinguish among different forms of speaking from the position of ¿I¿ in art-historical writing? What kind of ¿I¿ is at stake¿personal, professional, intellectual, imaginary, or otherwise?nnRequirements: Students will be required to attend all seminar meetings and participate actively in discussion. They will submit two types of writing assignments: The first, which each student will prepare on a rotating basis, will be a 2-page response to a selected reading that will serve to launch discussion of that text in seminar. The second, longer paper (12-15 pages) will involve original research on a selected object or exhibition and the writing of a paper that adopts the first person voice to some degree or explains its necessary rejection.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 445: What's not American about American Art?

This seminar focuses on American art as a history of migration (of people but also of visual objects) across national and continental boundaries. We examine trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific dialogues and consider how anxieties about foreigners, immigrants, and political dissidents shaped American art and culture at particular moments in the 20th century. In the second half of the course, we consider a series of museum exhibitions that repositioned American art as a history of social conflict and exclusion.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 448: The Body in Film and other Media (FILMSTUD 448)

In this seminar, we will consider the body on screen as well as the body before the screen i.e. the spectator but also the profilmic body of the actor to examine corporeal performance and reception with respect to audiovisual media. The dancing body, the comic body, dead and live bodies, the monstrous body, the body in pain, the virtual body all raise questions about embodiment, liveness, and performance. Through a discussion of make-up, fashion, the labor of producing the idealized star body from the meat-and-bones of a body of the actor, or body genres where the spectator's body is beside itself with sexual pleasure, fear and terror, or overpowering sadness, we may inquire into ideologies of discipline and desire that undergird mediatized bodies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Iyer, U. (PI)

ARTHIST 450: Art in the Age of Precarity

Art and precarity in the age of neoliberalism. How artists and critics engage questions of immaterial labor, human capital, structural racism, environmental crisis, the anthropocene and other current issues in their work. The question of art as activism and social practice relative to such themes. Enrollment contingent upon permission of instructor; permission numbers will be provided by staff upon professor's approval.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 452: Ghosts

Is history a form of ghost story? Historians summon the past--making it live in the present. Even the most empirical history is a kind of necromancy: the historian conjures the past, making it appear before our eyes. Tables and figures and other statistical data, no less than other other objective information, flutter in front of the reader like other sorts of ectoplasm in the crystal ball. In this course we will consider ghost stories and ghost paintings for what they reveal about the historian's occult craft. We will devote special attention to Stanford's campus as a haunted place, and students will write their final papers on some ghostly aspect of the university.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 453: Reading Walter Benjamin

Few cultural critics are so often cited by scholars in the humanities as Walter Benjamin. The impact of his writings has been decisive to some of the most influential art historians of recent memory, although usually based on a small number of texts (the Kunstwerk essay, the writings on photography, the flâneur, and cinema). Literary historians have turned to somewhat different studies with great profit, notably his writings on Baudelaire, translation, and German tragic drama. The publication of Benjamin¿s entire oeuvre in English has made his work more accessible to a broad range of scholars with diverse interests; one direction emerging from this familiarity is a deeper awareness of his commitment to materialist history. With the palpable collapse of ¿social art history¿ amongst younger art historians, dispersed ambitions of where ¿visual studies¿ might lead, and the return to aesthetic meditations derived from protracted analyses of single works, it may be the time to re-read Benjamin with an eye towards understanding his ambitions for a ¿materialist history.¿ That is the objective of this seminar : we will read deeply in Benjamin¿s writings, configure some ideas of what history meant to him, and attempt to export some of those practices to our current art-historical projects.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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