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121 - 130 of 274 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 244: The Visual Culture of the American Home Front, 1941-1945 (AMSTUD 244)

How does home front of WWII look now? What sort of meanings appear with the vantage of more than sixty years' distance? Examining Hollywood films from those years -films made during the war but mostly not directly about the war - the seminar focuses on developing students' abilities to write emotion-based criticism and history. Weekly short papers, each one in response to a film screening, are required. Among the films screened: Shadow of a Doubt, Gaslight, I Walked with a Zombie, The Best Years of Our Lives.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law (SIW 245)

This course examines the intersection of art, business, and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on issues that impact our understanding of works of art and their circulation in the modern and contemporary periods. Topics range from individual case studies (e.g., Leonardo da Vinci; Richard Serra) to the consolidation of the art market, and include cultural heritage issues, problems of censorship, and conceptions of authorship and intellectual property.nnIn Autumn 2017-18 this course will be offered at Stanford in Washington in Washington, D.C. and enrollment is limited to students who are enrolled in the SIW Program.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 246A: California Dreaming: West Coast Art and Visual Culture, 1848 - present

This seminar examines art, photography, and other forms of cultural production (e.g. film, advertisements, postcards) in and about California from the middle of the 19th century to the present. It approaches California as a contested political, historical and geographical site and as a series of images and alternative "lifestyles." How have artists pictured the state's diverse landscapes, both natural and commercial, as well as its complex history of labor, immigration, ethnicity, tourism, and social division?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 246B: Pop Art (AMSTUD 246B)

A new course on the history and meaning of Pop art in the United States and abroad. The course will feature close study of paintings, photographs, and prints at the Cantor Art Center. The course will be given in the Denning Family Resource Room, located in The Anderson Collection building. If you have any questions regarding the location, please contact Linda Esquivel at lindae@stanford.edu.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 246N: Pacific Dreams: Art in California

This course will explore the rich history of art in California from 1850-present. From Chiura Obata¿s exquisite views of Yosemite to ASCO¿s urgent political performances in the streets of Los Angeles, artists have engaged California¿s landscape, history, and diverse populations in myriad ways. Topics of study will include art in San Francisco Chinatown, Hollywood and contemporary art, psychedelia and the counterculture, African American performance and Afrofuturism, and punk rock in Los Angeles. Special attention will be paid to issues of immigration, race, and ethnicity in California. The course will include multiple museum visits and trips to important artistic sites in the Bay Area.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 248A: Architecture & Gender (CEE 32Y)

This advanced seminar introduces students to the seemingly inconspicuous relation between architecture and gender. The course studies how modern societies create easily, controlled docile spaces, thus pursuing the absent bodies of its members - be it through symbolic or material means. This troubled history of the powers of architecture to neglect sexuality and impose strict gender roles is analyzed in class discussions through recent feminist and queer theoretical approaches and tested on case studies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 248B: Architecture, Urbanism, and Visual Culture in Early Modern Rome

This seminar investigates architecture in Rome, from Michelangelo to Piranesi. It examines the origins of modern urbanism; the piazza as ceremonial theater; the water network and fountain displays; palace design inside and out; religious institutions, from convents to confraternities; church design inside and out; the devotional and illusionistic space of the family chapel; festival architecture; light symbolism and geometry; the use of new materials and technologies; the relationship of early modern architecture to painting and sculpture; and the question of a unity of the arts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 252: Transatlantic American Art

This is an American art history course from a transatlantic perspective, considering the ties between the United States and England from the colonial era to World War I, a period in which both nations underwent a similar trajectory of industrialization, urbanization, democratization, and expansionism/imperialism. We will explore the ways in which American attitudes towards England oscillated between anxious emulation and proud repudiation, as the ideas of ¿British culture¿ and ¿Englishness¿ became catalysts for national self-definition and touchstones for gendered and racialized metaphors of national vigor or decline. We will also examine how American artists received aesthetic conventions and artistic genres from Britain, and how the geography of the American landscape and questions of national character and taste challenged these traditions.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 252A: Art and Power: From Royal Spectacle to Revolutionary Ritual (FRENCH 252)

From the Palace of Versailles to grand operas to Jacques-Louis David's portraits of revolutionary martyrs, rarely have the arts been so powerfully mobilized by the State as in early modern France. This course examines how the arts were used from Louis XIV to the Revolution in order to broadcast political authority across Europe. We will also consider the resistance to such attempts to elicit shock-and-awe through artistic patronage. By studying music, architecture, garden design, the visual arts, and theater together, students will gain a new perspective on works of art in their political contexts. But we will also examine the libelous pamphlets and satirical cartoons that turned the monarchy¿s grandeur against itself, ending the course with an examination of the new artistic regime of the French Revolution. The course will be taught in English with the option of French readings for departmental majors.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 255: Hidden Histories: Art and Misrepresentation

What happens when art functions as a decoy, taking us away from stories that it refuses to tell? We will explore three modern artists who grapple, in unpredictable ways, with the historical events that have shaped them: Philip Guston and the Holocaust; Martin Puryear and the Civil Rights movement; and South African artist William Kentridge and apartheid. When appropriate, we will look at objects at the Cantor Art Center (Stanford) as well as museums in the Bay Area. The course will provide the foundation for an exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center and the Yale University Art Gallery in 2016.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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