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91 - 100 of 274 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 203: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar covers a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the ancient Greeks who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers- whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by eloquent experts, legal texts and lively page-turners. Classes meet in the seminar room and the Cantor Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 205: Cairo and Istanbul: Urban Space, Memory, Protest

In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, the city of Cairo has become a theater of social and political upheaval. In Istanbul, the Gezi protests in spring and summer 2013 drew attention to the contested public space. These events are the result of longstanding developments in the urban and social fabric. This seminar introduces students to the architectural and urban history of Istanbul and Cairo, with the current transformations as a central point of reference. Readings will focus on the tension between historical center and recent urban development, the social problems arising from the segregation, and reactions of scholars, architects, and artists to these issues.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 205A: Islamic Painting: Landscape, Body, Power

This seminar focuses on the production of paintings, mostly but not exclusively miniatures in books, in the Islamic world. A particular focus lies on the Muslim Empires of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, namely the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal realms, together stretching from the Balkans to India. During this period, illustrated books were popular objects of high-level patronage, and numerous examples have survived that allow a detailed study of the implications of these images. Themes discussed include: figural representation in Islam, patronage and court culture; gender and the body; illustrations of literature and history; images of Sufis ceremonies; portraiture; images of animals and nature; the impact of European prints and paintings; space and landscape. A field-trip to the Museum of Asian Art in San Francisco to view Mughal paintings from India is planned.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 205B: Iberian World Architecture (ARTHIST 405B)

The cities and buildings of the Iberian World of Spain, Portugal, and Ibero-America are a testament to the role architecture played during the centuries-long process of colonization: to its power since 1492 to disrupt and transform pre-existing material and cultural landscapes and thus facilitate the conquest of the New World and its peoples. In addition to their survival as symbols of power for many decolonized nations, now as then, the conspicuous archives of a conflicted history the particular nature of these constructions (the sheer perplexing quality of their decoration, for instance, encompassing at once pre-Columbian and Baroque motifs and techniques) demands we pay attention to their complexity, richness, and sophistication as well and in doing so, question canonical definitions of style, chronology, or authorship. Besides pairing recent scholarship with the examination of case studies, the seminar also makes extensive use of the work of George Kubler to help us understand what more »
The cities and buildings of the Iberian World of Spain, Portugal, and Ibero-America are a testament to the role architecture played during the centuries-long process of colonization: to its power since 1492 to disrupt and transform pre-existing material and cultural landscapes and thus facilitate the conquest of the New World and its peoples. In addition to their survival as symbols of power for many decolonized nations, now as then, the conspicuous archives of a conflicted history the particular nature of these constructions (the sheer perplexing quality of their decoration, for instance, encompassing at once pre-Columbian and Baroque motifs and techniques) demands we pay attention to their complexity, richness, and sophistication as well and in doing so, question canonical definitions of style, chronology, or authorship. Besides pairing recent scholarship with the examination of case studies, the seminar also makes extensive use of the work of George Kubler to help us understand what it means to encounter, study, and write about an architectural phenomenon of transoceanic cohesion within competing chronologies, and how that experience should transform us in return: it is no coincidence that after pondering the art and architecture of the Iberian World and its roots, Kubler published his groundbreaking The Shape of Time.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 206C: Nostos: The Survival of Antiquity in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 406C)

This seminar explores the processes of survival and activation of Greco-Roman art in the Middle Ages, including iconographic transformations, modalities of reuse, trajectories of return (nostos), and the poetics of embodiment. Focusing on specific case studies from Italy, Spain, France, and England, this course offers in-depth analyses of some of the most remarkable artworks of the Middle Ages in different media, paying special attention to sculpture. Reading assignments will give students the background to engage critically with the thought of scholars such as A. Warburg, E. Panofsky, S. Freud, W. Benjamin, G. Agamben, M. Schapiro, P. Nora, L. Steinberg, and others, with the aim of gaining a rich theoretical perspective on Nachleben der Antike (Afterlife of Antiquity) ¿ one of the central themes in the history of art from Vasari to the most recent Warburgian revival.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 206H: Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century (FEMGEN 216, HISTORY 216, HISTORY 316)

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 207B: Art and Ritual in Italy 1250-1420 (ARTHIST 407B)

This seminar explores the ritual contexts of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of late medieval Italy. Rituals structured almost every aspect of life in Italian towns. Elaborately choreographed rites of passage marked the great events of the life cycle, from pregnancy and childbirth to marriage to death. Each town¿s ritual calendar established the rhythms of the year. Major feast days were celebrated with all the pageantry of the late medieval Church. Crises ¿ whether famine or plague or the threat of war ¿ spawned their own ritual responses, often penitential processions of flagellants. The course considers the ways in which works of art register, respond to and participate in these rites. The last part of the course will focus on one of the most important and distinctive ritual spaces in late medieval Italy, the baptistery. Works to be studied include some by the greatest painters and sculptors of the era: the painters Duccio, Giotto, Simone Martini, Ambrogio Lorenzetti and Pietro Lorenzetti, and the sculptors Nicola Pisano and Giovanni Pisano.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 207C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208: Hagia Sophia (ARTHIST 408, CLASSICS 173, CLASSICS 273)

By employing a methodology based in psychoacoustics, semiotics, and phenomenology, this course explores the relationship among sound, water, marble, meaning, and religious experience in the sixth-century church of HagianSophia built by emperor Justinian in Constantinople. We will read medieval sources describing the interior and ritual, make short movies exploring the shimmer of marble in buildings on campus, and study the acoustics of domed buildings through computer auralization done at Stanford's CCRMA (Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 208B: The Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews (ARTHIST 408B)

The seminar explores the hybrid character of the art of Medieval Spain between the sixth and the fifteenth centuries. Rather than strictly chronological, our exploration of the artistic production of Muslims, Jews, and Christians is structured around major topics such as imperial power, pilgrimage, word and image. The readings juxtapose historical studies of specifically Spanish sites and objects with theoretical approaches tied to the broader themes.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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