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191 - 200 of 274 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 383: Theatre of the World: Contemporary Chinese Art (ARTHIST 183)

This course examines the intense and profound changes in Chinese Art from the end of Cultural Revolution to the first decades of the twenty-first century. Multiple course meetings will take place in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World will be on view. We will explore how artists express their ways of grappling with the social, political, economic, and personal issues through art. Major topics include cultural multiplicity, global challenge, consumerism, site specificity, and deconstructing and reconstructing of identities, among others. Our discussions will constantly incorporate factors of China's domestic context, global network, and artists' individual connections in order for students to understand the rich and complex dynamics of Chinese contemporary art.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lo, H. (PI)

ARTHIST 384: Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting (ARTHIST 184, JAPAN 184, JAPAN 284)

Changes marking the transition from medieval to early modern Japanese society that generated a revolution in visual culture, as exemplified in subjects deemed fit for representation; how commoners joined elites in pictorializing their world, catalyzed by interactions with the Dutch.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 385: Arts of China in the Early Modern World, 1550-1800 (ARTHIST 185)

From the late Ming period (ca. 1600) to early 20th century Chinese arts. Topics include: urban arts and print culture; commodification of art; painting theories; self portrayals; art sponsorship, collecting, and ideological programs at the Qing imperial court; media and modernity in Shanghai; art and politics in early 20th century China.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 386: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 186, JAPAN 186, JAPAN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 387: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, JAPAN 185, JAPAN 285)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 388A: The History of Modern and Contemporary Japanese and Chinese Architecture and Urbanism (ARTHIST 188A)

The recent rapid urbanization and architectural transformation of Asia; focus is on the architecture of Japan and China since the mid-19th century. History of forms, theories, and styles that serve as the foundation for today's buildings and cityscapes. How Eastern and Western ideas of modernism have merged or diverged and how these forces continue to shape the future of Japanese and Chinese architecture and urban form.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2011 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 388B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art (ARTHIST 188B)

Chinese artistic engagements with international arenas and with the cultural politics of modernity, from the late 19th century to the present. Topics will include Shanghai modernity and public media; artistic reform and political activism at the end of empire; competition between national style painting and international modernisms; politicized arts of resistance and revolution; post-Mao era experimental and avant-garde movements; transnational careers and exhibition circuits.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 389C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 189C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 400M: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (ARTHIST 200M)

An exploration of the low status of artists in a culture that valued their work but not the men themselves. Potters were especially scorned but even sculptors of gold and ivory statues were seen as "mechanics" (Herodotus), with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon), "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch). Topics include case studies of individual artists, their importance to the polis, their workshops, wages and occupational hazards and the impact of social isolation on the quality of their work.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 401: World War Two: Place, Loss, History (COMPLIT 343, GERMAN 343)

A consideration of how the Second World War still goes on today in the form of haunted absences and vivid representations. Studying literature and art in detail, the seminar will center on some of the places where those absences and representations gather: Portbou, Pearl Harbor, Auschwitz, Guadalcanal, London, Berlin, Hamburg, Rome, Omaha Beach, Peleliu, Monte Cassino, Hollywood. Writers and artists include: James Jones, Georges Didi-Huberman, Walter Benjamin, Eduardo Cadava, W.G. Sebald, Rachel Whiteread, Ingeborg Bachman, Wis¿awa Szymborska, Eugene Sledge, Hans Erich Nossack, Jorie Graham, Gerhard Richter, Dani Karavan, Tom Lea, W. Eugene Smith, Val Lewton, and Terrence Malick.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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