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251 - 260 of 299 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 460: Meta-Pictures

What happens to a painting or a photograph when it depicts another representation inside itself? Either as a window or as a literal other picture, or even in the portrayal of a shadow cast by a tree (itself a kind of representation), works of art change their nature, expanding their claims on our imagination, when they portray these "other worlds" that both consolidate and destroy the main picture they inhabit. Focusing on Victor Stoichita's The Self-Aware Image (1997), among other texts, we will discuss Renaissance and Baroque painting primarily but with ample room for students to write final papers on meta-pictures from many eras and places.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ARTHIST 461: The American Civil War: An Experiential History

Can one write a history of lived experience, of ephemeral states that never were represented? Can one look at representations of paintings, photographs, and literature to see where these ephemeral states might be trapped, or might otherwise be pictured? Feeling that the real war did not get in the books (for the most part), the course examines those books and other representations and so many things that never attained so exalted a form to look at the war anew. Methodological readings as well as readings about the Civil War.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

ARTHIST 462: The Sense of Place in American Art

The course will focus on places in American art, literature, and material culture--how places are imagined; how they are conceived in opposition to the pure flow of forgettable experience; how what happens in a place somehow remains.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

ARTHIST 463: Grad Seminar: American - Ekphrasis

Description is a prime skill for an art historian.  How to make a reader (or listener) see a work, whether it is illustrated or not, is arguably the most fundamental and important task and pleasure in this discipline.  How to make a world--both for oneself and for one's audience--is the larger purpose of such imagistic writing.  Considering historical and more recent examples of ekphrasis, the course will concentrate on works of art in the Cantor Arts Center, requiring each student to select a work that will become the basis for a quarter-long writing project.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

ARTHIST 464: American Art and Anthropology

This graduate seminar will address the intertwined histories of American art and anthropology from 1850-1950. During this period, the discipline of anthropology underwent a fundamental shift from a preoccupation with scientific racism to an emphasis on cultural pluralism. How did anthropology¿s transforming conception of ¿culture¿ inflect interethnic artistic exchange and the emergence of American modernism? Key subjects of inquiry will include racial objectification, the colonial gaze, ¿outsider¿ art, documentary and ethnographic film, and cultural appropriation.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARTHIST 465: Media Technology Theory (COMM 384, FILMSTUD 465A)

This course surveys major theoretical approaches to the study of media technologies, including Frankfurt School critical theory, media archaeology, actor network theory, science and technology studies, platform studies and theories of critical making. By the end of the course, students should have a rich familiarity with the literature in this area, as well as with exemplary empirical studies conducted within each tradition. Preference to Ph.D. students in Communication and Art and Art History. Consent of instructor required for non-PhD students.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 465A: Word and Image (ARTHIST 265A, COMPLIT 225, ITALIAN 265, ITALIAN 365)

What impact do images have on our reading of a text? How do words influence our understanding of images or our reading of pictures? What makes a visual interpretation of written words or a verbal rendering of an image successful? These questions will guide our investigation of the manifold connections between words and images in this course on intermediality and the relations and interrelations between writing and art from classical antiquity to the present. Readings and discussions will include such topics as the life and afterlife in word and image of Ovid's "Metamorphoses," Dante's "Divine Comedy," Ludovico Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso," and John Milton's "Paradise Lost;" the writings and creative production of poet-artists Michelangelo Buonarroti, William Blake, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti; innovations in and correspondences between literature and art in the modern period, from symbolism in the nineteenth century through the flourishing of European avant-garde movements in the twentieth century.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 466: Queer America (FEMGEN 466)

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Last offered: Winter 2017

ARTHIST 467: Cubism: Theory, Practice, & History

This course explores historiography and method in the history of art through a consideration of the multiple constructions of French Cubism as a complex of styles, a set of theoretical problems, and a historical phenomenon. We will explore how issues raised by, and about, Cubism have been articulated in recent literature on the subject. Prerequisite: this course is open only to graduate students or by permission of the instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

ARTHIST 468: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 268)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Last offered: Spring 2018
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