2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

261 - 270 of 299 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 465: Media Technology Theory (COMM 384, FILMSTUD 465A)

This course surveys major theoretical approaches to the study of media technologies, including Frankfurt School critical theory, media archaeology, actor network theory, science and technology studies, platform studies and theories of critical making. By the end of the course, students should have a rich familiarity with the literature in this area, as well as with exemplary empirical studies conducted within each tradition. Preference to Ph.D. students in Communication and Art and Art History. Consent of instructor required for non-PhD students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ARTHIST 466: Queer America (FEMGEN 466)

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Last offered: Winter 2017

ARTHIST 467: Cubism: Theory, Practice, & History

This course explores historiography and method in the history of art through a consideration of the multiple constructions of French Cubism as a complex of styles, a set of theoretical problems, and a historical phenomenon. We will explore how issues raised by, and about, Cubism have been articulated in recent literature on the subject. Prerequisite: this course is open only to graduate students or by permission of the instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

ARTHIST 468: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 268)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 470: Globalization and Contemporary Art

Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Globalization as the most important paradigm for the production, circulation, and reception of contemporary art since the 1990s. The expanding terrain of the art world; biennial culture; new economies of scale and the art market along with its critique in the discourses of empire and multitudes. Debates on the thematics of hybridity; post-Fordism; the flat world and capital flows; exteriority and site specificity; and new models of collectivism in recent art.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ARTHIST 471: Art & Fashion

This course will engage the interface between art and fashion through the lens of a Cantor Arts Center 2018 exhibition: The Art of the Brand: Mondrian, Saint Laurent and Pop Art in America. Students will write essays on objects in the exhibition for publication in the accompanying catalogue and for wall texts. The course explores the concept of branding as a means to organize new thinking about the relationship between classic modernism, fashion, and the ways in which pop artists (Lichtenstein, Segal, Warhol, Wesselmann) dealt with abstraction and figuration, originality and reproduction, elite and mass culture, in the process reinventing Mondrian¿s style as a brand that brings Warhol¿s Campbell¿s treatment of soup cans to mind.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ARTHIST 472: Mellon Curating Course

This course focuses on the production, criticism, and curating of art. It encompasses both the study of curatorial work and the organization of an exhibition at the Cantor. Through a series of required readings, intensive class discussions, class trips, guest lectures, and first-hand encounters with art objects and exhibitions, we will investigate the history and contemporary practice of curating. Our work together will culminate in an exhibition at the Cantor organized by class members in close consultation with Cantor staff. The show will open in late fall 2015-16 and will be on view for approximately 12-15 weeks. Students are expected to enroll in both the Spring 2014-15 and Fall 2015-16 quarters. For graduate students only and with the approval of the faculty. Course will be co-taught by Richard Meyer and Connie Wolf.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ARTHIST 473: Couture Culture

This seminar examines the relationship between art, fashion and representation in Europe and the United States at key moments between 1860 and the present. Beginning with Baudelaire, Impressionism, the rise of the department store and the emergence of haute couture, we will look at what might be described as the love/hate relationship between art and fashion that has been a recurring feature of modern and contemporary art, design and architecture, culminating in the spectacular fashion exhibitions mounted at the Guggenheim, Metropolitan, Victoria & Albert and other major art museums in recent years. Students will pursue related research projects of their choice. NOTE: Instructor consent required for undergraduate students. Please contact the instructor for permission to enroll.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARTHIST 475: Media Cultures of the Cold War (COMM 386)

The intersection of politics, aesthetics, and new media technologies in the U.S. between the end of WW II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Topics include the aesthetics of thinking the unthinkable in the wake of the atom bomb; abstract expressionism and 'modern man' discourse; game theory, cybernetics, and new models of art making; the rise of television, intermedia, and the counterculture; and the continuing influence of the early cold war on contemporary media aesthetics. Readings from primary and secondary sources in art history, communication, and critical theory.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARTHIST 477: Folk, Outsider, Self-Taught

This seminar will consider the subject of self-taught artists, who form a shadow history of American art. We will examine their work and reception by fine artists and institutions in the United States, looking specifically at how they aligned with, departed from, or helped define received art historical narratives. Special attention will be paid to issues of collecting and display, the shifting terms used to designate "self-taught," and theoretical and ethical concerns raised by the study of self-taught artists. Key themes will include theories of the archive, race, spirituality and enchantment, and disability. How might study of self-taught artists transform our understanding of canonical art historical movements? How does self-taught art challenge what it means to write about, research, and encounter objects in the world?
Last offered: Spring 2017
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints