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91 - 100 of 299 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 191: African American Art (AFRICAAM 191B)

This course surveys artworks made by African Americans in the United States and abroad. Students will explore major art movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement, and will study the impact of political movements on artists and their work, including the Black Liberation Movement and #BlackLivesMatter. In addition, students will consider how artists have contended with issues of race, gender, and sexuality and will examine transnational artist networks in Latin America and Europe among other places.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 192B: Art of the African Diaspora

This introduction to the art of the African Diaspora uses art and visual culture as means to explore the history and impact of the global spread of African peoples from slavery until the present day. Lectures and discussions will examine a range of artistic practices from street festivals and Afro-Caribbean religious traditions to the work of studio-trained artists of international repute.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 193: Jacob Lawrence's Twentieth Century: African American Art and Culture (CSRE 193)

This course explores African American art and culture through the lens of the Cantor Arts Center's rich holdings of work by Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000). Our approach will combine close looking with attention to Lawrence's cultural, political, and social contexts. Using Lawrence as starting point, we also will consider the work of African American artists such as Charles Alston, Norman Lewis, Aaron Douglas, Betye Saar, and Kara Walker in relation to historical events including the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression, World War II, and the Civil Rights Movement. Key themes include the interactions of art, music, and film; the history of radical black thought; as well as issues of curatorial display and conservation.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 194: U.S. Latinx Art (CHILATST 195, CSRE 195)

This course surveys artworks made by Latina/o/x artists who live and work in the United States, including Chicanos, Nuyoricans, and others of Latin American and Caribbean descent. Students will study the diversity that comprises the U.S. Latinx demographic while considering artists' relationships to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. They will also explore national debates, such as immigration and national security, that affect artists and their work. Special attention will be paid to cross-cultural and cross-racial exchanges between artists.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 202: Inherent Vice (ARTHIST 402)

Taught jointly by an art historian and a senior conservator, this research seminar focuses on selected objects (mostly) of modern and contemporary art many in Stanford collections -- that pose significant condition and/or conservation challenges for long term maintenance and display. Together we will examine the objects in the conservation lab and/or the gallery; students will then confer with appropriate museum staff, consult relevant curatorial and conservation files, research and debate potential treatments, and write up reports of their findings. Issues of aesthetics, ethics and other problems bearing on the material longevity of art will be explored together in class discussions as a foundation for thinking about the preservation and exhibition of works of art.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARTHIST 203: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar covers a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the ancient Greeks who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers- whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by eloquent experts, legal texts and lively page-turners. Classes meet in the seminar room and the Cantor Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 205: Cairo and Istanbul: Urban Space, Memory, Protest

In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, the city of Cairo has become a theater of social and political upheaval. In Istanbul, the Gezi protests in spring and summer 2013 drew attention to the contested public space. These events are the result of longstanding developments in the urban and social fabric. This seminar introduces students to the architectural and urban history of Istanbul and Cairo, with the current transformations as a central point of reference. Readings will focus on the tension between historical center and recent urban development, the social problems arising from the segregation, and reactions of scholars, architects, and artists to these issues.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 205A: Islamic Painting: Landscape, Body, Power

This seminar focuses on the production of paintings, mostly but not exclusively miniatures in books, in the Islamic world. A particular focus lies on the Muslim Empires of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, namely the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal realms, together stretching from the Balkans to India. During this period, illustrated books were popular objects of high-level patronage, and numerous examples have survived that allow a detailed study of the implications of these images. Themes discussed include: figural representation in Islam, patronage and court culture; gender and the body; illustrations of literature and history; images of Sufis ceremonies; portraiture; images of animals and nature; the impact of European prints and paintings; space and landscape. A field-trip to the Museum of Asian Art in San Francisco to view Mughal paintings from India is planned.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 205B: Iberian World Architecture (ARTHIST 405B)

The cities and buildings of the Iberian World of Spain, Portugal, and Ibero-America are a testament to the role architecture played during the centuries-long process of colonization: to its power since 1492 to disrupt and transform pre-existing material and cultural landscapes and thus facilitate the conquest of the New World and its peoples. In addition to their survival as symbols of power for many decolonized nations, now as then, the conspicuous archives of a conflicted history the particular nature of these constructions (the sheer perplexing quality of their decoration, for instance, encompassing at once pre-Columbian and Baroque motifs and techniques) demands we pay attention to their complexity, richness, and sophistication as well and in doing so, question canonical definitions of style, chronology, or authorship. Besides pairing recent scholarship with the examination of case studies, the seminar also makes extensive use of the work of George Kubler to help us understand what more »
The cities and buildings of the Iberian World of Spain, Portugal, and Ibero-America are a testament to the role architecture played during the centuries-long process of colonization: to its power since 1492 to disrupt and transform pre-existing material and cultural landscapes and thus facilitate the conquest of the New World and its peoples. In addition to their survival as symbols of power for many decolonized nations, now as then, the conspicuous archives of a conflicted history the particular nature of these constructions (the sheer perplexing quality of their decoration, for instance, encompassing at once pre-Columbian and Baroque motifs and techniques) demands we pay attention to their complexity, richness, and sophistication as well and in doing so, question canonical definitions of style, chronology, or authorship. Besides pairing recent scholarship with the examination of case studies, the seminar also makes extensive use of the work of George Kubler to help us understand what it means to encounter, study, and write about an architectural phenomenon of transoceanic cohesion within competing chronologies, and how that experience should transform us in return: it is no coincidence that after pondering the art and architecture of the Iberian World and its roots, Kubler published his groundbreaking The Shape of Time.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ARTHIST 206C: Nostos: The Survival of Antiquity in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 406C)

This seminar explores the processes of survival and activation of Greco-Roman art in the Middle Ages, including iconographic transformations, modalities of reuse, trajectories of return (nostos), and the poetics of embodiment. Focusing on specific case studies from Italy, Spain, France, and England, this course offers in-depth analyses of some of the most remarkable artworks of the Middle Ages in different media, paying special attention to sculpture. Reading assignments will give students the background to engage critically with the thought of scholars such as A. Warburg, E. Panofsky, S. Freud, W. Benjamin, G. Agamben, M. Schapiro, P. Nora, L. Steinberg, and others, with the aim of gaining a rich theoretical perspective on Nachleben der Antike (Afterlife of Antiquity) ¿ one of the central themes in the history of art from Vasari to the most recent Warburgian revival.
Last offered: Spring 2018
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