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21 - 30 of 274 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 114: Mystical Naturalism: Van Eyck, Dürer, and the Northern Renaissance (ARTHIST 314)

A survey of the major innovations in Northern European painting ca. 1400-1600, in light of the social status of the artist between city and court. In the early fifteenth century painters began to render an idealized world down to its smallest details in ways that engaged new devotional practices. Later Hieronymus Bosch would identify the painter¿s imagination with the bizarre and grotesque. In response to Renaissance humanism, some painters introduced classical mythology and allegorical subjects in their works, and many traveled south to absorb Italianate pictorial styles. We will be visiting art museums in San Francisco and Stanford. May be repeat for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

ARTHIST 117: Picturing the Papacy, 1300-1850 (ARTHIST 317)

Popes deployed art and architecture to glorify their dual spiritual and temporal authority, being both Christ's vicars on earth and rulers of state. After the return of the papacy from Avignon, Rome underwent numerous campaigns of renovation that staged a continuity between the pontiffs and the ancient Roman emperors. Patronage of art and architecture became important tools in the fight against Protestantism. Artists include Botticelli, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, and Bernini.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

ARTHIST 118: Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto (ARTHIST 318)

The course addresses the ways in which Venetian painters of the sixteenth century redefined paradigms of color, design, and invention. Themes to be examined include civic piety, new kinds of mythological painting, the intersection between naturalism and eroticism, and the relationship between art and rituals of church and statecraft.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 118A: Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance

This course examines the history and traditions of artistic engagement in public space in Iran. It offers a unique glimpse into Iran¿s contemporary art and visual culture through the investigation of public art practices and cultural expression, as well as older traditions of performing arts such as Parde-khani and Ta¿zieh. The course will be held in conjunction with the Stanford symposium, Art, Social Space and Public Discourse in Iran.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

ARTHIST 118N: Pagan Mythology and the Making of Modern Europe

Once a religion looses its claim to truth it enters the sphere of the mythic. From the fifteenth through the seventeenth century, European artists turned to the legends and poetry of Greco-Roman paganism for pictorial subjects. What roles could Venus and Mars, Mercury and Minerva play in a Christian culture? Artists and humanists had different answers to this question. As relics from the past the stories of the ancient gods could serve as the prehistory of worldly and religious institutions and hence legitimize them. Or pagan myth, because of its alien nature, could convey fantasies of the body, which could not be articulated otherwise. Among the artists who explored creatively the ancient legends were Donatello, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Raphael, Velazquez, Rubens, Rembrandt, Bernini, and Poussin. Next to ancient authors such as Homer and Ovid we shall be reading excerpts from the humanists Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, and Vasari as we explore word/image relationships. The seminar includes excursions to the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University to look at Old Master prints from the museum¿s storage, not normally on display, and we shall study paintings and sculptures with mythological subjects in the Legion of Honor, the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARTHIST 119: Love at First Sight: Visual Desire, Attraction, and the Pleasures of Art

Why do dating sites rely on photographs? Why do we believe that love is above all a visual force? How is pleasure, even erotic pleasure, achieved through looking?nnWhile the psychology of impressions offers some answers, this course uncovers the ways poets, songwriters, and especially artists have explored myths and promoted ideas about the coupling of love and seeing. Week by week, we will be reflecting on love as political critique, social disruption, and magical force. And we will do so by examining some of the most iconic works of art, from Dante's writings on lovesickness to Caravaggio's Narcissus, studying the ways that objects have shifted from keepsakes to targets of our cares. While exploring the visual roots and evolutions of what has become one of life's fundamental drives, this course offers a passionate survey of European art from Giotto's kiss to Fragonard's swing that elicits stimulating questions about the sensorial nature of desire and the human struggle to control emotions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 120: Living in a Material World: Seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish Painting (ARTHIST 320)

Painting and graphic arts by artists in Flanders and Holland from 1600 to 1680, a period of political and religious strife. Historical context; their relationship to developments in the rest of Europe and contributions to the problem of representation. Preferences for particular genres such as portraits, landscapes, and scenes of everyday life; the general problem of realism as manifested in the works studied.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 121: 18th-Century Art in Europe, ca 1660-1780 (ARTHIST 321)

Major developments in painting across Europe including the High Baroque illusionism of Bernini, the founding of the French Academy, and the revival of antiquity during the 1760s, with parallel developments in Venice, Naples, Madrid, Bavaria, and London. Shifts in themes and styles amidst the emergence of new viewing publics. Artists: the Tiepolos, Giordano, Batoni, and Mengs; Ricci, Pellegrini, and Thornhill; Watteau and Boucher; Chardin and Longhi; Reynolds and West; Hogarth and Greuze; Vien, Fragonard, and the first works by David. Additional discussion for graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 122: The Age of Revolution: Painting in Europe 1780-1830 (ARTHIST 322)

Survey of European painting bracketed by the French Revolution and the end of the Napoleonic conquest. Against this background of social upheavel, the visual arts were profoundly affected by shifts in patronage, public, and ideas about the social utility of image making. Lectures and readings align ruptures in the tradition of representation with the unfolding historical situation, and trace the first manifestations of a "romantic" alternative to the classicism that was the cultural legacy of pre-Revolutionary Europe.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 123N: Thinking about Visual Attention : from Balzac to Facebook

Writing in 1829, the French author Honoré de Balzac celebrated the acute visual attention of the flâneur, a character he closely associates with modern life: "To flâne is to take pleasure, to collect flashes of wit, to admire sublime scenes of unhappiness, of love, of joy as well as graceful or grotesque portraits, to thrust one's attention into the depths of a thousand lives." In July 2012 the Huffington Report pointed to a fact of modern life: "On city streets, in suburban parking lots and in shopping centers, there is usually someone strolling while talking on a phone, texting with his head down, listening to music, or playing a video game. The problem isn't as widely discussed as distracted driving, but the danger is real." These two very different ways of circulating in urban space suggest that a major shift in how we humans relate to our environment has occurred over the course of nearly two centuries--especially in the densely populated spaces of modern cities. Where the great spectacle of urban life was a marvel of the nineteenth century, today's inhabitants want mainly to block it out by insulating themselves in a cocoon of favorite music or personal conversation, whether by voice or text, that they risk stepping into traffic, colliding with lightposts, or bumping into others similarly self-absorbed. This seminar proposes to think about the hows and whys of that important shift from the unique perspective of art history, a field of study especially attuned to the limits and exigencies of visual acuity. We will explore the topic across a range of media, from daguerreotypes to stereoscopes, from paintings to films, from television screen to the hand-held displays of our smartphones.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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