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151 - 160 of 251 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 320: Living in a Material World: Seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish Painting (ARTHIST 120)

Painting and graphic arts by artists in Flanders and Holland from 1600 to 1680, a period of political and religious strife. Historical context; their relationship to developments in the rest of Europe and contributions to the problem of representation. Preferences for particular genres such as portraits, landscapes, and scenes of everyday life; the general problem of realism as manifested in the works studied.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 321: 18th-Century Art in Europe, ca 1660-1780 (ARTHIST 121)

Major developments in painting across Europe including the High Baroque illusionism of Bernini, the founding of the French Academy, and the revival of antiquity during the 1760s, with parallel developments in Venice, Naples, Madrid, Bavaria, and London. Shifts in themes and styles amidst the emergence of new viewing publics. Artists: the Tiepolos, Giordano, Batoni, and Mengs; Ricci, Pellegrini, and Thornhill; Watteau and Boucher; Chardin and Longhi; Reynolds and West; Hogarth and Greuze; Vien, Fragonard, and the first works by David. Additional discussion for graduate students.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 322: The Age of Revolution: Painting in Europe 1780-1830 (ARTHIST 122)

Survey of European painting bracketed by the French Revolution and the end of the Napoleonic conquest. Against this background of social upheavel, the visual arts were profoundly affected by shifts in patronage, public, and ideas about the social utility of image making. Lectures and readings align ruptures in the tradition of representation with the unfolding historical situation, and trace the first manifestations of a "romantic" alternative to the classicism that was the cultural legacy of pre-Revolutionary Europe.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 324: The Age of Naturalism, Painting in Europe1830-1874 (ARTHIST 124)

Survey of European painting from the heyday of Romanticism to the first Impressionist exhibition. Lectures and readings focus on the tensions between traditional forms and ambitions of history painting and the challenge of "modern" subjects drawn from contemporary life. Attention to the impact of painting in the open-air, and the effect of new imaging technologies- notably lithography and photography - to provide "popular" alternatives to the hand-wrought character and elitist appeal of "high art" cultural forms.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 326: Post-Naturalist Painting (ARTHIST 126)

How conceptual models from language, literature, new technologies, and scientific theory affected picture making following the collapse of the radical naturalism of the 1860s and 1870s. Bracketed in France by the first Impressionist exhibition (1874) and the first public acclamation of major canvases by Matisse and Picasso (1905), the related developments in England, Germany, Belgium, and Austria. Additional weekly discussion for graduate students. Recommended: some prior experience with 19th-century art.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 332: American Art and Culture, 1528-1910 (AMSTUD 132, ARTHIST 132)

The visual arts and literature of the U.S. from the beginnings of European exploration to the Civil War. Focus is on questions of power and its relation to culture from early Spanish exploration to the rise of the middle classes. Cabeza de Vaca, Benjamin Franklin, John Singleton Copley, Phillis Wheatley, Charles Willson Peale, Emerson, Hudson River School, American Genre painters, Melville, Hawthorne and others.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 342A: The Architecture of Thought: Artists and Thinkers Design for Themselves (ARTHIST 142A)

This course investigates houses, hideaways, and studios that artists and thinkers have designed for themselves with varying degrees of self-consciousness, from subconscious images of the self to knowing stages for the contemplative life. Case studies range from antiquity to the present, from the studio-house of Peter Paul Rubens to that of Kurt Schwitters; from the house-museum of Sir John Soane to the Vittoriale of Gabriele D'Annunzio; from the philosophical dwelling of the Emperor Hadrian to that of Ludwig Wittgenstein.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 343A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 344B: Modern Design from the Eiffel Tower to Yves Saint Laurent (ARTHIST 144B)

Iconic episodes in the history of modern European and American design, including production, consumption, circulation and display -- from iron architecture of the department store and the universal exhibition to the branding practices of Andy Warhol and Yves Saint Laurent.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 345: Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950 (AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 145, FEMGEN 145)

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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