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51 - 60 of 238 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 155C: Abstract Expressionism: Painting/Modern/America (AMSTUD 155C)

The course will focus on American abstract painting from the 1930s to the 1960s, emphasizing the works of art at the Anderson Collection at Stanford. We will focus on looking closely at pictures by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and other renowned abstract painters, developing skills of speaking and writing about these works of art. We will also place these pictures in their mid-20th century context: World War II and the Cold War; Hollywood and popular culture generally; Beat literature; and locations such as New York and San Francisco.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 156: American and European Art, 1945-1968 (ARTHIST 356)

Examines the pivotal figures, movements, themes and practices of art in the United States and Europe, from the conclusion of World War 2 to the end of the 1960s. Emphasis is on the changed nature of the avant-garde after the catastrophic events of midcentury. Topics include: modern art, ideology and the Cold War; the rise of consumer society and the "Society of the Spectacle"; concepts of medium specificity; the impact of new media and technologies on postwar art making; the role of the artist as worker and activist. Movements include: Abstract Expressionism, Art Informel, Pop, minimalism, process, performance conceptual art. An introductory art history course is recommended.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ARTHIST 156A: Warhol: Painting, Photography, Performance (ARTHIST 356A, TAPS 156A, TAPS 356A)

This course focuses on the career of Andy Warhol as a means to consider the broader history of American art and culture since 1950. It examines little-studied aspects of Warhol¿s visual production (e.g. his career as a commercial artist in the 1950s and his everyday photographs of the 1970s and 1980s) alongside his now-canonical Pop paintings of the 1960s. Warhol?s critical and scholarly reception will be scrutinized in detail, as will published interviews of and writings by the artist. Finally, we will consider Warhol¿s legacy and wide-ranging influence on American culture in the decades since his death in 1987.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 156N: Art and the Power of Place: Site, Location, Environment

Many iconic works in the history of art draw their power and significance from the place in which they are sited or installed. The cave paintings of Altamira, Spain; Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel and the monumental "earthworks" made in the deserts of the American Southwest during the 1960s are just a few examples showcasing the important relationship between art and place. In this seminar we will explore how works of art throughout history create a sense of place; and how place, in turn, changes the interpretation of works of art. We will learn how to analyze works of art in terms of their immediate contexts and surroundings, whether temples, museums, spaces of the city or unexpected environments, charting the historical meanings of place in the process. We will look at a range of examples throughout time, from prehistory to the present day. A critical feature of the seminar will be to consider works of art outside the classroom, on both the Stanford campus and beyond. Possible field trips include visits to Alcatraz Prison (where the famous Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei, will install a new work in the fall of 2014)
Last offered: Winter 2015

ARTHIST 157A: Histories of Photography (ARTHIST 357A)

This course investigates multiple histories of photography. It begins in early nineteenth-century Europe with the origins of the medium and ends in the United States on September 11, 2001, a day that demonstrated the limits of photographic seeing. Rather than stabilizing any single trajectory of technological iterations, the course is more interested in considering the ¿work¿ performed by photography. Through historical case studies, it considers how `to photograph¿ is to order and to construct the world; to incite action and to persuade; to describe and to document; to record and to censor; to wound; to heal.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 157B: Picture This: A History of Photography from the Civil War to the Selfie

TBA

ARTHIST 158S: Iconography to Instagram: A History of Images and Information

This class will survey how artists, designers and cultures have historically used images as a means to organize and communicate information. How do representations convey meaning in a manner different from language? What do visual conventions reveal about the cultures and technologies that shape them? How and why might artists and viewers subvert the legibility of images? To address these questions, this course proceeds by way of close visual analysis of key works, while exploring their historical, technological, social and artistic contexts. nn Topics to be explored include: iconography and interpretation; the relationship between maps and painting; the importance of printmaking to the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution; the visual culture of the newspaper as reflected in (and satirized by) Cubist and Dadaist art; the political impact of photography (illustrated by a visit to an exhibition of Lewis Hine¿s photographs at the Cantor Center for Visual Arts); the rhetorical conventions of television news and advertising. Later weeks will address representational norms which have emerged in the wake of digital technology: multi-screen displays, Powerpoint and interactive infographics, concluding with a discussion around the data-gathering functions of social media platforms such as Instagram. Ultimately, students will learn the fundamentals of visual communication across media and history, but will also reflect on art¿s enduring ability to transcend and resist a purely informational role in culture.
Last offered: Summer 2016

ARTHIST 159: American Photographs, 1839-1971: A Cultural History (AMSTUD 159X, ARTHIST 359)

This course concentrates on many important American photographers, from the era of daguerreotypes to near the end of the pre-digital era. We study photographs of the Civil War, western exploration, artistic subjects, urban and rural poverty, skyscrapers, crime, fashion, national parks, and social protest, among other topics. Among the photographers we study: Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Garry Winogrand, and Diane Arbus. Emphasis on developing students' abilities to discuss and write about photography; to see it.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 159A: Photography and Anthropology (ANTHRO 129A)

This course focuses on anthropologists¿ engagement with photographs as part of their research and writing. In thinking about the relationship between text and image, we will consider how photographs have been used as documentation, data, evidence, art, illustration, and research tools. The course examines some ethical and aesthetic issues anthropologists have struggled with when producing, analyzing, writing about, investigating with and publishing photographs. Students in this course will take and display photographs, as well as discuss, analyze, read about and write about them.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Wetsel, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 160: Intro to Contemporary Art

Introduction to major themes, figures, movements and ideas in contemporary art, beginning with the question of art and politics in the 1960s. Topics: Postmodernism and the rise of consumer and spectacle culture; the "death" of painting, the impact of technology, cybernetics and the rise of new media; art at the end of the Cold War; globalization and the new global art world. An intro art history course is recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2014
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