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101 - 110 of 237 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 215C: What is Contemporary Art?

This course focuses on the production, criticism, and curating of contemporary art. Through a series of required readings, intensive class discussions, class trips, and first-hand encounters with art objects and exhibitions, we will investigate current understandings of contemporary art. We will also consider the history of contemporary art by looking at how art of the past was understood in its own moment, when it was new and now.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 216: Collecting for the Cantor

Students in this course will conduct the necessary art historical and collections research to select a work of art on paper for acquisition by the Cantor Arts Center. Readings and discussions will consider the history of collecting, as well as cultural, ethical, logistical, and economic questions involved in collection building. Prerequisite: one Art History course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ARTHIST 216A: Michelangelo Architect (ARTHIST 416A, CEE 33A, ITALIAN 216)

The architecture of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), "Father and Master of all the Arts," redefined the possibilities of architectural expression for generations. This course considers his civic, ecclesiastic, and palatial works. It proceeds from his beginnings in Medicean Florence to his fulfillment in Papal Rome. It examines the anxiety of influence following his death and his enduring legacy in modernism. Topics include: Michelangelo's debt to Classical and Early Renaissance prototypes; his transformation of the canon; the iterative sketch as disegno; architecture and the body; the queering of architectural language; sketch, scale, and materiality; Modernism and Michelangelo. The historiography of Michelangelo has predominantly favored studies in painting and sculpture. Our focus on architecture encourages students to test new ideas and alternative approaches to his work.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 217B: The Classical Theory of Architecture from Antiquity to the French Revolution (ARTHIST 417B)

This seminar focuses on themes and theories in architectural design from antiquity until the early twentieth century. Modern and contemporary architecture has often claimed its modernity through the incorporation of theory, but this seminar examines selections from key texts that have also moulded architectural and urbanistic thought in the ancient, medieval, and early modern eras in combination with analytical comparisons of built architecture.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ARTHIST 223: Living in the Material World: Imagination and Agency (ARTHIST 423)

This seminar deals with the materials that artists have chosen in art and construction from antiquity to the early modern era. The particular focus is upon pre-modern perceptions of the inherent properties of materials, from amber and ivory to marble and granite, as well as the diverse ways in which societies have associated particular substances with social and cultural values. Particular emphasis is laid upon the architectural use of materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 225: Cezanne

This seminar will study the complexity and richness of pictures made by Paul Cézanne that affected the course of modernist painting during the early twentieth century. Usually called an Impressionist, Cézanne shares only partially Monet's concern for fleeting effects, and he evokes little of Renoir¿s charm. He did not paint the bustle of city life like Manet or Degas. Cézanne spent most of his career near his hometown of Aix-en-Provence painting landscapes, a few local residents, and many still-lifes. Yet Matisse was serious when he said, "Cézanne, you see is a sort of god of painting. Dangerous his influence? So what? Too bad for those without the strength to survive it." The seminar will explore the foundations of that influence.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARTHIST 229D: Topophilia: Place in Japanese Visual Culture through 19th Century (JAPANGEN 229)

Attachments to "place" and "home" are hard-wired into the biology of humans and animals alike, although such attachments vary according to specific times, cultures, and states of mind. Can we speak of a "Japanese sense of place" and if so, what is distinctive about it? Seminar explores religious visions and ritual fields; narratives of itinerancy; cityscapes; topographic taxonomies. Knowledge of Japanese culture is beneficial but not mandatory.

ARTHIST 238C: Art and the Market (FRENCH 238)

This course examines the relationship between art and the market, from the château-builders of the French Renaissance to avant-garde painters in the nineteenth-century Salon des Refusés. Using examples drawn from France, this course explores the relationship between artists and patrons, the changing status of artists in society, patterns of shifting taste, and the effects of museums on making and collecting art. Students will read a mixture of historical texts about art and artists, fictional works depicting the process of artistic creation, and theoretical analyses of the politics embedded in artworks. They will engage in sustained analysis of individual artworks, as well as the market structures in which such artworks were produced and bought. The course will be taught in English, with the option of readings in French for departmental majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Pesic, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 243C: The Art of Travel

This undergraduate seminar explores a variety of objects upon which we see the marks of makers smitten and/or stymied by new technologies of transportation ¿ objects about the steamship, the railroad, the automobile, the airplane, the space shuttle, the internet. Among many types of material culture, the course considers scrimshaw, album quilts, maps, paintings, photographs, city plans, hood ornaments, and advertisements from the early Republic to the present. How do objects mark geographic movement, and the social relationships forged in the process? What do these marks tell us about how we, as contemporary viewers, experience the world?
Last offered: Winter 2015

ARTHIST 244: The Visual Culture of the American Home Front, 1941-1945 (AMSTUD 244)

How does home front of WWII look now? What sort of meanings appear with the vantage of more than sixty years' distance? Examining Hollywood films from those years -films made during the war but mostly not directly about the war - the seminar focuses on developing students' abilities to write emotion-based criticism and history. Weekly short papers, each one in response to a film screening, are required. Among the films screened: Shadow of a Doubt, Gaslight, I Walked with a Zombie, The Best Years of Our Lives.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
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