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41 - 50 of 237 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 145: Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950 (AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 345, FEMGEN 145)

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 146X: What is Contemporary Art, and Where Did it Come From?

"Contemporary art challenges us to question our assumptions," wrote philanthropist and collector Eli Broad. "It asks us to think beyond the limits of conventional wisdom." This course aims to introduce both the difficulties and the great rewards presented by Contemporary Art (1970 to the present). Examining the historical foundations of Contemporary Art in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, we will learn about the century's most game-changing art practices and movements such as cubism, abstract expressionism, conceptual art, and performance art. Working from the assumption that art in its moment of production was always contemporary, the course will organize content through various thematic lenses such as "portraiture and vision", "the photographic", and "the hand and the mind." Lectures occur both as traditional classroom sessions as well as on-site sessions at Stanford University's public sculpture collection, the Cantor Art Center, and the Anderson Collection, emphasizing close and more »
"Contemporary art challenges us to question our assumptions," wrote philanthropist and collector Eli Broad. "It asks us to think beyond the limits of conventional wisdom." This course aims to introduce both the difficulties and the great rewards presented by Contemporary Art (1970 to the present). Examining the historical foundations of Contemporary Art in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, we will learn about the century's most game-changing art practices and movements such as cubism, abstract expressionism, conceptual art, and performance art. Working from the assumption that art in its moment of production was always contemporary, the course will organize content through various thematic lenses such as "portraiture and vision", "the photographic", and "the hand and the mind." Lectures occur both as traditional classroom sessions as well as on-site sessions at Stanford University's public sculpture collection, the Cantor Art Center, and the Anderson Collection, emphasizing close and direct engagement with artworks. Drawing on these experiences and on close readings of key texts, assignments will range from short essays to online curation to gallery talks. Students will develop and enhance their critical visual literacy and ability to grapple with the unknown through skills of creative synthesis, identifying patterns across time and space, and exercising conceptual and visual analysis. Broadly, the goals of the class are to understand the present through the past, to demystify the often confusing nature of contemporary art, and to question why art matters and how.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 147: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 347)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 148: Art and the First Amendment: Testing the Limits of Expression (SIW 148)

This course will take place in Washington D.C.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 149S: Art After the A-bomb: American and European Art, 1945-1989

This course surveys the major movements, figures, and themes in American and European art during the Cold War, from the drop of the A-bomb in 1945 to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. It examines the formative relationship between art and politics in this explosive period. We will consider the changed role of the avant-garde after the catastrophes of World War II; the use and abuse of modern art as propaganda; spectacular postwar affluence and the rise of the culture industry; multimedia, intermedia, and the invention of new communications technologies; the burgeoning military-industrial complex and the Vietnam War; the revolutionary efforts of second-wave feminism, sexual liberation, and the counterculture; and the charged debates of the ¿culture wars¿ and the crisis of representation in the 1980s. What was art¿s social, cultural, and political function in the recent past¿and how is this role instructive in the present? Topics include Abstract Expressionism, Color Field Painting, Neo-Dada, Pop, Op, Fluxus, Happenings, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Performance, Institutional Critique, Process Art, Systems Art, Earth Art, Video Art, and theories of modernism and postmodernism. We will visit the Cantor Arts Center to view original works.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 152: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 154: The American Civil War: A Visual History (AMSTUD 154X, ARTHIST 354)

A painting of men charging across a field, a photograph of dead bodies in a ditch, a fragment of metal, a sliver of bone, and a brass button: how do we make sense of the visual record of the American Civil War (1861-65)? From the Capitol Dome to a skeleton dug up in a highway project a hundred years after the last battle, the course will consider the strange and scattered remnants of a famous era. Drawing on the poetry of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville, the paintings of Winslow Homer, the photographs of Alexander Gardner, and the oratory of Abraham Lincoln, the course will examine what cannot be portrayed: the trauma of war.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 154B: Who We Be: Art, Images & Race in Post-Civil Rights America (AFRICAAM 188, CSRE 88)

Over the past half-century, the U.S. has seen profound demographic and cultural change. But racial progress still seems distant. After the faith of the civil rights movement, the fervor of multiculturalism, and even the brief euphoria of a post-racial moment, we remain a nation divided. Resegregation is the norm. The culture wars flare as hot as ever.nnThis course takes a close examination of visual culture¿particularly images, works, and ideas in the contemporary arts, justice movements, and popular culture¿to discuss North American demographic and cultural change and cultural politics over the past half-century. From the Watts uprising to the #BlackLivesMatter movement, from multiculturalism through hip-hop to post-identity art, we will deeply explore the questions: How do Americans see race now? Do we see each other any more clearly than before?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 154C: American Art Since 1776

How have artworks and artifacts shaped life and culture in the United States? This course considers a variety of objects, from canonical eighteenth-century paintings to decorative art, children's books, outsider art, and other creative expressions often overlooked in traditional surveys. How do art historians come to know such objects and, importantly, the past with them? How might we understand the historical implications of visual and material culture and share them in our writing? Close and creative looking, methodologies from art history and material culture studies, and an engagement with the wider visual, material, and literary worlds of these years will help us explore these and other questions. A final paper produced in stages throughout the term will afford students an opportunity to produce a six-page art historical essay of their own on an artwork or artifact of their choosing, preferably in a local collection. What might these objects and their study reveal to us about our history, present, and future?
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Larnerd, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 155C: Abstract Expressionism: Painting/Modern/America (AMSTUD 155C)

The course will focus on American abstract painting from the 1930s to the 1960s, emphasizing the works of art at the Anderson Collection at Stanford. We will focus on looking closely at pictures by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and other renowned abstract painters, developing skills of speaking and writing about these works of art. We will also place these pictures in their mid-20th century context: World War II and the Cold War; Hollywood and popular culture generally; Beat literature; and locations such as New York and San Francisco.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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