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211 - 220 of 237 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 466: Queer America (FEMGEN 466)

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 467: Cubism: Theory, Practice, & History

This course explores historiography and method in the history of art through a consideration of the multiple constructions of French Cubism as a complex of styles, a set of theoretical problems, and a historical phenomenon. We will explore how issues raised by, and about, Cubism have been articulated in recent literature on the subject. Prerequisite: this course is open only to graduate students or by permission of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 470: Globalization and Contemporary Art

Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Globalization as the most important paradigm for the production, circulation, and reception of contemporary art since the 1990s. The expanding terrain of the art world; biennial culture; new economies of scale and the art market along with its critique in the discourses of empire and multitudes. Debates on the thematics of hybridity; post-Fordism; the flat world and capital flows; exteriority and site specificity; and new models of collectivism in recent art.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 472: Mellon Curating Course

This course focuses on the production, criticism, and curating of art. It encompasses both the study of curatorial work and the organization of an exhibition at the Cantor. Through a series of required readings, intensive class discussions, class trips, guest lectures, and first-hand encounters with art objects and exhibitions, we will investigate the history and contemporary practice of curating. Our work together will culminate in an exhibition at the Cantor organized by class members in close consultation with Cantor staff. The show will open in late fall 2015-16 and will be on view for approximately 12-15 weeks. Students are expected to enroll in both the Spring 2014-15 and Fall 2015-16 quarters. For graduate students only and with the approval of the faculty. Course will be co-taught by Richard Meyer and Connie Wolf.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 475: Media Cultures of the Cold War (COMM 386)

The intersection of politics, aesthetics, and new media technologies in the U.S. between the end of WW II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Topics include the aesthetics of thinking the unthinkable in the wake of the atom bomb; abstract expressionism and 'modern man' discourse; game theory, cybernetics, and new models of art making; the rise of television, intermedia, and the counterculture; and the continuing influence of the early cold war on contemporary media aesthetics. Readings from primary and secondary sources in art history, communication, and critical theory.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 477: Folk, Outsider, Self-Taught

This seminar will consider the subject of self-taught artists, who form a shadow history of American art. We will examine their work and reception by fine artists and institutions in the United States, looking specifically at how they aligned with, departed from, or helped define received art historical narratives. Special attention will be paid to issues of collecting and display, the shifting terms used to designate "self-taught," and theoretical and ethical concerns raised by the study of self-taught artists. Key themes will include theories of the archive, race, spirituality and enchantment, and disability. How might study of self-taught artists transform our understanding of canonical art historical movements? How does self-taught art challenge what it means to write about, research, and encounter objects in the world?
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 478: Problems in the History of Collecting, Circulation and Display

This graduate seminar involves intensive study of art collecting, circulation and display through the lens of one of the principal institutions of art history: the museum. It will include a site visit to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum to gain a comprehensive view of this complex institution as a basis for seminar-related research and writing. Limited to PhD students in Art History and Film Studies, or by permission of the instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 482A: Approaching Dunhuang: Methods and Debates

This seminar will explore recent scholarly approaches to the visual arts of the Buddhist cave shrine complex at Dunhuang in northwest China between the 5th and 9th c. CE. Topics will include real and virtual spatiality of the cave shrines; questions of function (ritual, memorial, meditative, visualization); textual and doctrinal relationships of images and spaces; patronage and political contexts; production techniques; narrative and paradise iconographies; icons and illustrations. The seminar group will visit the concurrent major Dunhuang exhibition at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles and focus especially on banner paintings, sculptures, and replica cave shrines (275, 285, 320) represented in the exhibition.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 485: The Situation of the Artist in Traditional Japan (JAPANGEN 220)

Topics may include: workshop production such as that of the Kano and Tosa families; the meaning of the signature on objects including ceramics and tea wares; the folk arts movement; craft guilds; ghost painters in China; individualism versus product standardization; and the role of lineage. How works of art were commissioned; institutions supporting artists; how makers purveyed their goods; how artists were recognized by society; the relationship between patrons¿ desires and artists¿ modes of production.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 485A: Exhibiting East Asian Art

This seminar will explore the history, conceptual approaches, design, and practicalities of museum-based exhibitions of East Asian art. Through readings, field trips, and site-based exercises the seminar will look to inform the planned reinstallation of the Cantor Center's East Asian galleries. Open to graduate and undergraduate students with interests in art history, museology, design, and cultural representation. Permission of the instructor required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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