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181 - 190 of 209 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 457: Abstract Expressionism

Coinciding with the opening of the Anderson Collection in the fall of 2014, this seminar considers the expanded field of Abstract Expressionism relative to both domestic and international cultural politics. Topics: Modernism and existentialism; transnational avant-gardes; interdisciplinary approaches to the visual image at mid-century; the ideologies of formalism and autonomous art; cold war aesthetics. Pollock. de Kooning, Guston, Newman, Rothko, Still, Gorky others. Close readings of Greenberg, Rosenberg and critics associated with Partisan Review and little magazines. Enrollment limited by application only; Phd students only with preference to Art History.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

ARTHIST 458: Warhol and After

This seminar focuses on the wide-ranging career of Andy Warhol as a means to consider the broader history of American art and culture since 1950. It examines little-studied aspects of Warhol¿s visual production (e.g. his career as a commercial artist in the 1950s, his everyday photographs of the 1970s and 1980s) as well as now-canonical Pop paintings of the early-to-mid 1960s. Warhol¿s critical and scholarly reception will be scrutinized in detail, as will published interviews of and writings by the artist. Finally, we will consider Warhol¿s legacy and influence on American art in the decades since his death in 1987.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 461: The American Civil War: An Experiential History

Can one write a history of lived experience, of ephemeral states that never were represented? Can one look at representations of paintings, photographs, and literature to see where these ephemeral states might be trapped, or might otherwise be pictured? Feeling that the real war did not get in the books (for the most part), the course examines those books and other representations and so many things that never attained so exalted a form to look at the war anew. Methodological readings as well as readings about the Civil War.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

ARTHIST 462: The Sense of Place in American Art

The course will focus on places in American art, literature, and material culture--how places are imagined; how they are conceived in opposition to the pure flow of forgettable experience; how what happens in a place somehow remains.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

ARTHIST 463: Grad Seminar: American - Ekphrasis

Description is a prime skill for an art historian.  How to make a reader (or listener) see a work, whether it is illustrated or not, is arguably the most fundamental and important task and pleasure in this discipline.  How to make a world--both for oneself and for one's audience--is the larger purpose of such imagistic writing.  Considering historical and more recent examples of ekphrasis, the course will concentrate on works of art in the Cantor Arts Center, requiring each student to select a work that will become the basis for a quarter-long writing project.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

ARTHIST 465: Media Technology Theory (COMM 384)

This course surveys major theoretical approaches to the study of media technologies, including Frankfurt School critical theory, media archaeology, actor network theory, science and technology studies, platform studies and theories of critical making. By the end of the course, students should have a rich familiarity with the literature in this area, as well as with exemplary empirical studies conducted within each tradition. Preference to Ph.D. students in Communication and Art and Art History. Consent of instructor required for non-PhD students.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ARTHIST 470: Globalization and Contemporary Art

Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Globalization as the most important paradigm for the production, circulation, and reception of contemporary art since the 1990s. The expanding terrain of the art world; biennial culture; new economies of scale and the art market along with its critique in the discourses of empire and multitudes. Debates on the thematics of hybridity; post-Fordism; the flat world and capital flows; exteriority and site specificity; and new models of collectivism in recent art.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Lee, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 472: Mellon Curating Course

This course focuses on the production, criticism, and curating of art. It encompasses both the study of curatorial work and the organization of an exhibition at the Cantor. Through a series of required readings, intensive class discussions, class trips, guest lectures, and first-hand encounters with art objects and exhibitions, we will investigate the history and contemporary practice of curating. Our work together will culminate in an exhibition at the Cantor organized by class members in close consultation with Cantor staff. The show will open in late fall 2015-16 and will be on view for approximately 12-15 weeks. Students are expected to enroll in both the Spring 2014-15 and Fall 2015-16 quarters. For graduate students only and with the approval of the faculty. Course will be co-taught by Richard Meyer and Connie Wolf.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 475: Media Cultures of the Cold War (COMM 386)

The intersection of politics, aesthetics, and new media technologies in the U.S. between the end of WW II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Topics include the aesthetics of thinking the unthinkable in the wake of the atom bomb; abstract expressionism and 'modern man' discourse; game theory, cybernetics, and new models of art making; the rise of television, intermedia, and the counterculture; and the continuing influence of the early cold war on contemporary media aesthetics. Readings from primary and secondary sources in art history, communication, and critical theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ARTHIST 478: Problems in the History of Collecting, Circulation and Display

This graduate seminar involves intensive study of art collecting, circulation and display through the lens of one of the principal institutions of art history: the museum. It will include a site visit to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum to gain a comprehensive view of this complex institution as a basis for seminar-related research and writing. Limited to PhD students in Art History and Film Studies, or by permission of the instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2015
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