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41 - 50 of 188 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 178: Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature (AMSTUD 178, ARTHIST 378)

The role of the visual arts of the U.S. in the construction and contesting of racial, class, and gender hierarchies. Focus is on artists and writers from the 18th century to 1990s. How power, domination, and resistance work historically. Topics include: minstrelsy and the invention of race; mass culture and postmodernity; hegemony and language; memory and desire; and the borderlands.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 186: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 386, JAPANGEN 186, JAPANGEN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 188B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art

Chinese artistic engagements with international arenas and with the cultural politics of modernity, from the late 19th century to the present. Topics will include Shanghai modernity and public media; artistic reform and political activism at the end of empire; competition between national style painting and international modernisms; politicized arts of resistance and revolution; post-Mao era experimental and avant-garde movements; transnational careers and exhibition circuits.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 189C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 389C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 192B: Art of the African Diaspora

This introduction to the art of the African Diaspora uses art and visual culture as means to explore the history and impact of the global spread of African peoples from slavery until the present day. Lectures and discussions will examine a range of artistic practices from street festivals and Afro-Caribbean religious traditions to the work of studio-trained artists of international repute.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Wofford, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 203: Greek Art In and Out of Context (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar considers Greek artifacts in the context of Greek life (including the life of the workshop), and the endless ways in which craftsmen served the needs of Greek society. Their foundries, factories and ceramic studios produced the material goods that defined Greek life: temples, statues and other offerings for the gods; arms and armor for warriors; sporting equipment and prizes for athletes; houses, clothing and crockery for the family; ships and sailcloth, wagons and ploughs, wine and oil-presses for a thriving domestic and overseas economy; gravestones and funeral vases for the dead. (Formerly CLASSART 109.) nMost of the antiquities exhibited in museums, or purchased by private collectors from galleries and auction houses, survive because they were buried with people who used and cherished them. The Greeks¿ belief that the artifacts they valued in life would serve them in the afterlife informs the second part of the seminar, which is devoted to the recent history of tomb looting and the illicit trafficking in antiquities.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 205: Cairo and Istanbul: Urban Space, Memory, Protest

In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, the city of Cairo has become a theater of social and political upheaval. In Istanbul, the Gezi protests in spring and summer 2013 drew attention to the contested public space. These events are the result of longstanding developments in the urban and social fabric. This seminar introduces students to the architectural and urban history of Istanbul and Cairo, with the current transformations as a central point of reference. Readings will focus on the tension between historical center and recent urban development, the social problems arising from the segregation, and reactions of scholars, architects, and artists to these issues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Blessing, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 207C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 208: Hagia Sophia (CLASSICS 173)

By employing a methodology based in psychoacoustics, semiotics, and phenomenology, this course explores the relationship among sound, water, marble, meaning, and religious experience in the sixth-century church of HagianSophia built by emperor Justinian in Constantinople. We will read medieval sources describing the interior and ritual, make short movies exploring the shimmer of marble in buildings on campus, and study the acoustics of domed buildings through computer auralization done at Stanford's CCRMA (Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics)
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 208B: The Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews

The seminar and its study trip explore the hybrid character of the art of Medieval Spain between the sixth and the fifteenth centuries. Rather than strictly chronological, our exploration of the artistic production of Muslims, Jews, and Christians is structured around major topics such as imperial power, pilgrimage, word and image. The readings juxtapose historical studies of specifically Spanish sites and objects with theoretical approaches tied to the broader themes.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
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