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1 - 2 of 2 results for: ARCHLGY234

ARCHLGY 234: Museum Cultures: Exhibiting the African Imaginary (AFRICAST 134, AFRICAST 234, ARCHLGY 134, ARTHIST 284B)

Museums are dynamic spaces with the potential to reinvent, rehabilitate, and recenter marginalized people and collections. This year, our seminar examines and enacts museum stewardship of material cultures of diverse African communities across space, time, and context. Legacies of colonialism inspire debates on restitution, reparation, and reconciliation, alongside actions to 'decolonize' museum practice. In engaging the politics of representation and human-object relationships, our class will challenge problematic imaginaries of Africa and recenter the complexities of cultures in the Horn of Africa spanning Ethiopia, Nubian Egypt, and Sudan. Students will acquire skills in researching, curating, and installing an exhibition based on Stanford's African archeological and ethnographic materials held at the Stanford University Archeology Collections (SUAC). This course will culminate in a student-curated exhibition that opens on Friday May 27, 2022 at the Stanford Archeology Center (Bldg 500) and is planned to feature renowned Somali-Swedish archeologist, Dr. Sada Mire, as the keynote speaker.nnBecause of limited spacing you will need to fill out this form https://forms.gle/h8F46iv5iSwiX3PY7 and receive consent to enroll in the course from the instructor. nn3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

ARCHLGY 234A: Petroleum Geochemistry in Environmental and Archaeological Studies (ARCHLGY 134A, GEOLSCI 134, GEOLSCI 234)

This course focuses on petroleum, including gases, liquids, refined products, and `tar¿ from seeps used as a binder in archaeological artifacts, such as projectile points or pottery. The course is designed for students of geology, environmental science, and archaeology. It shows how molecular fossils (biomarkers) and other petroleum compounds can be used to identify the origins of contaminants, assist strategies for remediation, deconvolute mixtures, and validate the spatial significance of mapped hydrocarbon distributions. Lectures explain the processes that control petroleum composition in the subsurface, marine or subaerial spills, and archaeological artifacts, e.g., biodegradation, photooxidation, and water washing. Case studies (e.g., Deepwater Horizon, Exxon Valdez, bitumen in Egyptian mummies, seeps and ancient Olmec artifacts) and exercises show how geochemistry and multivariate statistics (chemometrics) can be used in successful forensic or archaeological studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Peters, K. (PI)
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