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11 - 20 of 87 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 75Q: Mad Dogs and Englishmen: Archaeology and the Modern History of the Ancient Near East

The decades between the early-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries saw substantial change in the region Europeans referred to as the Near East, characterized by the decline of the Ottoman empire, the disarray of World War I, and the establishment of modern national borders. You will learn to analyze, interpret, and critically evaluate archaeological data and the ways in which that data is used to construct an historical narrative. Readings include ancient texts in translation; archaeological field records and reports; travelogues, personal letters and autobiographies; and scholarly articles on the art and archaeology of the Near East.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARCHLGY 78: Disruption and Diffusion: The Archaeology of Innovation (ANTHRO 78A)

This undergraduate seminar uses engagement with canonical archaeological topics and questions about the emergence of civilization to introduce students to critical perspectives on the nature of novelty, progress, and modernity. The first weeks of the course will be spent learning about archaeological hypotheses and debates on early human innovation (e.g. urban development, agriculture). Later weeks will focus on developing a robust theoretical framework through which to better understand and interrogate claims about the origin of innovation.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ARCHLGY 79: Mediterranean Archaeology Today: Heritage, Ethics, and Practice in a Changing World

While archaeology engages with material remains from the past, it is embedded in and inseparable from contemporary practice. This seminar discusses a wide range of ethical dilemmas raised by archaeology in the 21st century. It aims to develop an acquaintance with legal and ethical codes as well as disciplinary practices that relate to cultural heritage, with a strong focus on the ancient Mediterranean world. Such issues will be approached primarily through discussion and debate of current case studies including: ownership and destruction of cultural property, colonialism and decolonization, ethical responsibilities in scientific practice, and cultural, nationalistic, religious, and popular uses of heritage. By the end of the term, students should be able to apply critical reasoning to a variety of ethical issues related to heritage of the Mediterranean world and beyond, and to articulate (in oral and written form) responses to current controversial topics about the human past.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARCHLGY 80: Heritage and Human Rights (ANTHRO 80A)

What does archaeology have to say about human rights? Is there a right to cultural heritage? How can archaeology and heritage help protect rights¿or encroach upon them? Themes we will address in this course include the archaeological investigation of human rights topics; the right to heritage; conflicts of different rights regimes in heritage contexts; and ethical considerations about rights during research and heritage management. These questions will take us to cases as diverse as forensic investigation of the disappeared in Argentina, the archaeology of homelessness in the U.K., the destruction of heritage as cultural genocide in Bosnia and the Middle East, and the rights of indigenous groups in Australia and the U.S. to control cultural heritage.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

ARCHLGY 81: Introduction to Roman Archaeology (CLASSICS 52)

(Formerly CLASSART 81.) This course will introduce you to the material culture of the ancient Roman world, from spectacular imperial monuments in the city of Rome to cities and roads around the Mediterranean, from overarching environmental concerns to individual human burials, from elite houses and army forts to the the lives of slaves, freedmen and gladiators. Key themes will be change and continuity over time; the material, spatial and visual workings of power; how Roman society was materially changed by its conquests and how conquered peoples responded materially to Roman rule.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARCHLGY 83: Pots, People, and Press: Greek Archaeology in the Media (CLASSICS 93)

Archaeological discovery has long captured the popular imagination, and the media undoubtedly plays a crucial role in this phenomenon. In the case of Greek archaeology, much of this imagination has been intertwined with the legacies of ancient Greek culture(s) in the construction of modern identities and ideologies, including the concept of ¿Western Civilization.¿ This course explores the intersections between academic research, media narratives, and the social, political, and cultural context of Greek archaeology from the 19th century to the present. Through a diachronic range of case studies, we will engage with a selection of media accounts and representations, alongside scholarly work and commentaries. In doing so, the class will more broadly examine issues surrounding archaeological evidence and interpretation, narrative formation, the reception and appropriation of the past, conceptualizations of race and ethnicity, nationalism and archaeology, and cultural heritage management. No prior knowledge of Greek archaeology is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Duray, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 84: Incas, Spaniards, and Africans: Archaeology of the Kingdom of Peru

Students are introduced to Andean archaeology from the rise of the Inca empire through the Spanish colonial period. We will explore archaeological evidence for the development of late pre-Hispanic societies in western South America, the Spanish conquest, and the origins of key Spanish colonial institutions in the Andean region: the Church, coerced indigenous labor, and African slavery. Central to this course is an archaeological interrogation of the underpinnings and legacies of colonialism, race, and capitalism in the region. Students will also consider the material culture of daily life and those living on the social margins, both in pre-Hispanic societies and under Spanish rule.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weaver, B. (PI)

ARCHLGY 86: Digital Methods for Archaeology and Anthropology

Digital tools can be a powerful way of collecting, analyzing and presenting data in social-cultural anthropology and archaeology. This survey course is designed for students from all backgrounds interested in developing practical skills in computational methods, no previous computational experience is required. Over the span of four 2.5 week units, we will develop foundational skills for 1) text processing, 2) geospatial analysis (e.g GIS), 3) bioinformatics and paleogenetics, and 4) data visualization. Each unit will take a deep dive into the way these approaches have been used in anthropology in published case studies. This will be complemented by digital lab activities (suitable for remote or in-person learning) to develop skills and complete an independent project of your choosing with the tools learned in this course. The goal is to set you up with digital tools that are useful to you in academic, journalistic, and other related endeavors.

ARCHLGY 92: Introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology (CLASSICS 92)

This course will introduce students to the art and archaeology of Greece and the Greek world from the Neolithic through Early Roman periods. By integrating both historical and current approaches to the archaeology of Greece, this course aims to supplement the typical chronological narrative of the development of Greek material culture with various thematic explorations (e.g. nationalism in archaeology, social complexity, postcolonial approaches), as well as to critically evaluate mechanisms of interpretation in Greek archaeology over time.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ARCHLGY 95: Monumental Pasts: Cultural Heritage and Politics

What is heritage? Who decides what and how pasts matter? Our pasts loom monumental in multiple senses. At the intersection of archaeology and anthropology, the emerging discipline of heritage is often described as the politics of the past. What people choose to take from their histories varies and is often contested. Heritage shapes and is shaped by power. This course introduces contemporary themes and debates in cultural heritage. Together we'll develop a critical stance toward dominant perspectives to understand how pasts are used, erased, reclaimed, and mobilized in the present, for the future. In doing so we'll think through concepts such as materiality, intangibility, monumentality, value, memory, identity, community, nationalism, and universality. Our case studies will range from contemporary debates over Jim Crow era monuments in the USA, to UNESCO World Heritage List politics, and the development of community identities. We will also reflect on heritage at a personal scale and its relationship to belonging. Course materials will include readings and media from around the globe. Students will participate through seminar discussions, proposing and presenting topics of their choice, regular journal entries, and a choice of final project¿podcast, paper, or exhibition plan.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
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