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21 - 30 of 42 results for: ARCHLGY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ARCHLGY 124: Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual (ARCHLGY 224)

This course explores many aspects of food in human history from an archaeological perspective. We will discuss how the origins of agriculture helped to transform human society; how food and feasting played a prominent role in the emergence of social hierarchies and the development of civilization; and how various foodways influenced particular cultures. We will also conduct experimental studies to understand how certain methods of food procurement, preparation, and consumption can be recovered archaeologically.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 126: Archaeobotany (ARCHLGY 226)

Archaeobotany, also known as paleoethnobotany, is the study of the interrelationships of plants and humans through the archaeological record. Knowledge and understanding of Archaeobotany sufficient to interpret, evaluate, and understand archaeobotanical data. Dominant approaches in the study of archaeobotanical remains: plant macro-remains, pollen, phytoliths, and starch grains in the identification of diet and environmental reconstruction.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Wang, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 128: Europe Before the Romans: Early Complex Societies (CLASSICS 128)

This course will provide a broad introduction to theories of change in early complex societies and polities. Over the course of the quarter, we will examine a series of hotly debated theoretical frameworks. From the beginning, you will develop a case study for your final research paper using an appropriate theoretical framework. The course will look at a series of global case studies but will focus specifically on western Europe¿s protohistoric Iron Age (c.800¿100BCE), a period of technological innovation, rich art and cultural expression, rapidly growing connectivity and trade, alongside rapid social and political change.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Mallon, K. (PI)

ARCHLGY 130: Senior research seminar for Archaeology majors and minors

The aim of this research seminar is to provide an opportunity for students to experience and participate in research projects that bring together various aspects of the archaeology courses taken during the student's time at Stanford. The research projects will be tailored to the specific interests of the individual students involved and will involve individualized and independent research. In some cases the projects will grow out of Honors Theses, or out of fieldwork or internships undertaken. The projects will be individually supervised by the faculty teacher and will be designed to incorporate theory, method as well as particular information from particular regions and time periods. The projects will involve independent problem solving and writing up of results.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Hodder, I. (PI)

ARCHLGY 131: The Use and Abuse of Prehistory (ANTHRO 131A, CLASSICS 138)

To borrow Glyn Daniel¿s phrase, the ¿Idea of Prehistory,¿ invokes notions of deep time, human origins, and mysterious monuments. While the origins of prehistoric research in the 19th century were connected to the emerging sciences of geology, evolution, and archaeology, they were just as intertwined with nation-state building, colonialism, and race science. This course examines the development of prehistory through a thematic and critical lens. How have Western conceptualizations of time and writing affected the definition and study of prehistory? What are some of the colonial legacies in both research agendas and museum collections? Do new methods always provide new answers? What role has gender played in prehistoric interpretation? Drawing from case studies in the Mediterranean, the Americas, Europe, and Africa, we will explore various archaeological approaches to prehistory from the late 19th century to the present, as well as how the idea of prehistory itself has evolved, expanded, or been abandoned altogether.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Duray, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 135: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 235, CHINA 175, CHINA 275)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 145: Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean (CLASSICS 154)

Why do we care about shipwrecks? What can sunken sites and abandoned ports tell us about our past? Focusing primarily on the archaeological record of shipwrecks and harbors, along with literary evidence and contemporary theory, this course examines how and why ancient mariners ventured across the "wine-dark seas" of the Mediterranean for travel, warfare, pilgrimage, and especially commerce. We will explore interdisciplinary approaches to the development of maritime contacts and communication from the Bronze Age through the end of Roman era. At the same time, we will engage with practical techniques of maritime archaeology, which allows us to explore the material record first hand.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (CLASSICS 151)

Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 156: Design of Cities (CLASSICS 156, CLASSICS 256)

Long-term, comparative and archaeological view of urban planning and design. Cities are the fastest changing components of the human landscape and are challenging our relationships with nature. They are the historical loci of innovation and change, are cultural hotspots, and present a tremendous challenge through growth, industrial development, the consumption of goods and materials. We will unpack such topics by tracking the genealogy of qualities of life in the ancient Near Eastern city states and those of Graeco-Roman antiquity, with reference also to prehistoric built environments and cities in the Indus Valley and through the Americas. The class takes an explicitly human-centered view of urban design and one that emphasizes long term processes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
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