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21 - 30 of 39 results for: ARCHLGY ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ARCHLGY 129: Archaeology of Gender and Sexuality (ANTHRO 111, FEMGEN 119)

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Voss, B. (PI)

ARCHLGY 130: Senior research seminar for Archaeology majors and minors

The aim of this research seminar is to provide an opportunity for students to experience and participate in research projects that bring together various aspects of the archaeology courses taken during the student's time at Stanford. The research projects will be tailored to the specific interests of the individual students involved and will involve individualized and independent research. In some cases the projects will grow out of Honors Theses, or out of fieldwork or internships undertaken. The projects will be individually supervised by the faculty teacher and will be designed to incorporate theory, method as well as particular information from particular regions and time periods. The projects will involve independent problem solving and writing up of results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hodder, I. (PI)

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 137: Political Exhumations. Killing Sites Research in Comparative Perspective (ANTHRO 137D, ARCHLGY 237, REES 237)

The course discusses the politics and practices of exhumation of individual and mass graves. The problem of exhumations will be considered as a distinct socio-political phenomenon characteristic of contemporary times and related to transitional justice. The course will offer analysis of case studies of political exhumations of victims of the Dirty War in Argentina, ethnic cleansing in former Yugoslavia, the Holocaust, communist violence in Poland, the Rwandan genocide, and the Spanish Civil War. The course will make use of new interpretations of genocide studies, research of mass graves, such as environmental and forensic approaches.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Domanska, E. (PI)

ARCHLGY 145: Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean (CLASSICS 154)

Why do we care about shipwrecks? What can sunken sites and abandoned ports tell us about our past? Focusing primarily on the archaeological record of shipwrecks and harbors, along with literary evidence and contemporary theory, this course examines how and why ancient mariners ventured across the "wine-dark seas" of the Mediterranean for travel, warfare, pilgrimage, and especially commerce. We will explore interdisciplinary approaches to the development of maritime contacts and communication from the Bronze Age through the end of Roman era. At the same time, we will engage with practical techniques of maritime archaeology, which allows us to explore the material record first hand.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 148: Ceramic Analysis for Archaeologists (ARCHLGY 248)

The analysis and interpretation of ceramic remains allow archaeologists to accomplish varied ends: establish a time scale, document interconnections between different areas, and suggest what activities were carried out at particular sites. The techniques and theories used to bridge the gap between the recovery of ceramics and their interpretation within archaeological contexts is the focus of this seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Womack, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (CLASSICS 151)

Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 156: Design of Cities (CLASSICS 156, CLASSICS 256)

Long-term, comparative and archaeological view of urban planning and design. Cities are the fastest changing components of the human landscape and are challenging our relationships with nature. They are the historical loci of innovation and change, are cultural hotspots, and present a tremendous challenge through growth, industrial development, the consumption of goods and materials. We will unpack such topics by tracking the genealogy of qualities of life in the ancient Near Eastern city states and those of Graeco-Roman antiquity, with reference also to prehistoric built environments and cities in the Indus Valley and through the Americas. The class takes an explicitly human-centered view of urban design and one that emphasizes long term processes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ARCHLGY 165: Roman Gladiators (CLASSICS 164)

In modern America, gladiators are powerful representatives of ancient Rome (Spartacus, Gladiator). In the Roman world, gladiators were mostly slaves and reviled, barred from certain positions in society and doomed to short and dangerous lives. A first goal of this course is to analyze Roman society not from the top down, from the perspective of politicians, generals and the literary elite, but from the bottom up, from the perspective of gladiators and the ordinary people in the stands. A second goal is to learn how work with very different kinds of evidence: bone injuries, ancient weapons, gladiator burials, laws, graffiti written by gladiators or their fans, visual images of gladiatorial combats, and the intricate architecture and social control of the amphitheater. A final goal is to think critically about modern ideas of Roman ¿bloodthirst.¿ Are these ideas justified, given the ancient evidence?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 190: Archaeology Directed Reading/Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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