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41 - 50 of 83 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 132: The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique (ANTHRO 332A, ARCHLGY 232, ARCHLGY 332)

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Last offered: Winter 2012

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 135: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 235, CHINA 175, CHINA 275)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 136: Artifacts in the Atomic Age: Isotopes in Archaeology

Advances in material science over the 20th and 21st centuries have greatly expanded archaeologists' tool-kit for studying the material remains of the past. In particular, isotopic chemistry has come to play an important role in answering questions of prime importance to archaeological research: How old is this artifact? Where did it come from? What did people and animals eat in the past? How did humans and animals move in the landscape? In this course, we will explore a variety of methods that use isotopic chemistry to answer anthropological questions about human lives in the past. The course will provide a background in the science of isotopic abundance and fractionation in natural and technological systems. It will also investigate wide variety of archaeological case studies that use chemistry to explore topics of anthropological interest, including: migration, technology, social inequality, food & nutrition, human-animal interactions, and human-environment interactions.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARCHLGY 142: Lost and found: Roman Coinage (ARCHLGY 242, CLASSART 232)

New trends in Roman numismatics (from the late Republic to the early Empire, 3rd-c. BCE-1st-c. CE). Archaeology from coins. Barter, money, and coinage. The introduction of coinage in Rome and the provinces. Making money (coin production), using money (monetary, non-monetary and ritual uses), losing money (coin circulation, hoards, single finds): contextual interpretations. Monetary systems: coins from Rome and coins from the provinces. Coinage and identity. False coinage.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARCHLGY 143: Classical Archaeology Today: Ethical Issues of Excavation, Ownership, and Display

(Formerly CLASSART 143.) While Classical archaeology engages with material remains from the Greco-Roman past, it is embedded within and inseparable from contemporary practice. Through an examination of case studies, legal statutes, professional codes, and disciplinary practices, this seminar discusses ethical dilemmas raised by Classical archaeology in the 21st century. We will focus on broad issues ranging from ownership, looting, reconstruction, and collecting to nationalism, religion, tourism, and media, with an eye toward defining ethical ¿best practices¿ for Classical archaeology.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER

ARCHLGY 145: Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean (CLASSICS 154)

(Formerly CLASSART 145.) Why do we care about shipwrecks? What can sunken sites and abandoned ports tell us about our past? Focusing primarily on the archaeological record of shipwrecks and harbors, along with literary evidence and contemporary theory, this course examines how and why ancient mariners ventured across the "wine-dark seas" of the Mediterranean for travel, warfare, pilgrimage, and especially commerce. We will explore interdisciplinary approaches to the development of maritime contacts and communication from the Bronze Age through the end of Roman era. At the same time, we will engage with practical techniques of maritime archaeology, which allows us to explore the material record first hand.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 146B: Global Heritage, World Heritage: History and Intersections in Contemporary Society (ANTHRO 146B)

This Course will provide an overview of global heritage by focusing on the UNESCO World Heritage Program, which is based on an international treaty, the 1972 Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. The first part of the course will provide an historical overview on the development of the international preservation movements, the second part of the course will concentrate on how anthropology can contribute to the study of intergovernmental organizations and cultural bureaucracies, the third part and will discuss specific issues related to heritage by providing case studies from the World Heritage. This course will provide theoretical and empirical interpretations of contemporary issues in heritage and will give students a critical understanding of the complexities related to various uses of past in the present.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ARCHLGY 147B: World Heritage in Global Conflict (ANTHRO 147B, ANTHRO 247B)

Heritage is always political, it is typically said. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has over 1000 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally, but has found it¿s own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ARCHLGY 148: Ceramic Analysis for Archaeologists (ARCHLGY 248)

The analysis and interpretation of ceramic remains allow archaeologists to accomplish varied ends: establish a time scale, document interconnections between different areas, and suggest what activities were carried out at particular sites. The techniques and theories used to bridge the gap between the recovery of ceramics and their interpretation within archaeological contexts is the focus of this seminar.
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