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31 - 40 of 83 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 117A: Stuff (ANTHRO 117A, ANTHRO 217A)

Never before have humans been engulfed by so much stuff. Stuff is needed to survive giving us the basics of food, clothing, and shelter. But stuff does so much more. Smart phones rule our social interactions. Louis Vuitton handbags display status. Air conditioning masters nature. Picassos inspire beauty. Wedding bands promise eternal love. Crosses connect believers to God. Is stuff really who we are? This seminar explores the science of stuff, past, present and future, investigating deeply-held beliefs about the meaning, value, and purpose of objects. Because our stuff has become such a popular obsession, this course embraces the eclectic intersection of popular and academic knowledge. Students will seek to answer the complex whys of our relationship with objects and understand our future human condition made by the material world.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARCHLGY 117B: Monuments and Landscapes: An Archaeological Perspective (ANTHRO 117B, ANTHRO 217B)

The landscape is a result of the action and interaction of human and natural factors. Communities have altered their landscapes for a variety of reasons, including the subsistence practices; as a consequence of economic growth; to express a social ideology, and as a consequence of political and religious drivers. Accordingly, landscapes enable physical and provide psychological sustenance to people, and the human need to relate to our surroundings is part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Within the humanities, landscape is being conceptualized as a process, a practice and as performance, and monuments within a given landscape have an equally important role, not to mention history. They are often the most durable and well-known evidence of the ancient civilizations, and should be observed jointly with the landscape. How did the landscape predefine the monument and how did the monument complement, emphasize or devalue the landscape? What philosophy channeled the construction of the monuments within the landscapes? Whether ephemeral or permanent, the human agency left traces in the landscape; thus, both monuments and landscapes are the key indicators for understanding the ideology of a particular culture. Archaeology, through its interdisciplinary nature, provides a unique perspective, as well as tools, for examining the formation processes of all man-made elements, within both natural and cultural landscapes. nnThe course will address the multifaceted issues of the ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them through time. It will look into diverse, geographically and periodically influenced concepts of a monument and landscape. The course will be divided into two parts, with the first one covering the theory and methodological approaches and the second part the conceptual characteristics, modifications and changeability in various archaeological and historical periods and cultural frameworks.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ARCHLGY 118: Engineering the Roman Empire (CLASSICS 168)

(Formerly CLASSART 117.) Enter the mind, the drafting room, and the building site of the Roman architects and engineers whose monumental projects impressed ancient and modern spectators alike. This class explores the interrelated aesthetics and mechanics of construction that led to one of the most extensive building programs undertaken by a pre-modern state. Through case studies ranging from columns, domes and obelisks to road networks, machines and landscape modification, we investigate the materials, methods, and knowledge behind Roman innovation, and the role of designed space in communicating imperial identity.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARCHLGY 119: Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains (ANTHRO 119, ANTHRO 219)

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ARCHLGY 123A: Debating Repatriation (ANTHRO 123A, ANTHRO 223A)

The debates over the return of cultural property have raged for centuries. At stake are key questions about the rights of Indigenous peoples, intellectual freedom, nationalism, globalization, heritage management, the meaning of history, and the purpose of museums in the world. This seminar examines these vital discussions that intersect law and morality, science and religion, culture and politics. Discussions will be informed by cross-cultural, legal, ethical perspectives, exploring both the philosophical and practical implications of the repatriation debates. This course will provide students with a nuanced historical viewpoint of museum collections, heritage policies, and legal dimensions that underpin contests over cultural property.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARCHLGY 124: Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual (ARCHLGY 224)

This course explores many aspects of food in human history from an archaeological perspective. We will discuss how the origins of agriculture helped to transform human society; how food and feasting played a prominent role in the emergence of social hierarchies and the development of civilization; and how various foodways influenced particular cultures. We will also conduct experimental studies to understand how certain methods of food procurement, preparation, and consumption can be recovered archaeologically.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 125: ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SURVEY METHODS

Practicum applying a variety of survey techniques to discover, map, and record archaeological sites. Basic cartographic skills for archaeologists and an introduction to GIS tools, GPS instruments, and geophysical techniques. Participants should be able to walk 3 - 4 miles over uneven terrain or make special arrangements with the instructor for transportation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Jones, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 126: Archaeobotany (ARCHLGY 226)

Archaeobotany, also known as paleoethnobotany, is the study of the interrelationships of plants and humans through the archaeological record. Knowledge and understanding of Archaeobotany sufficient to interpret, evaluate, and understand archaeobotanical data. Dominant approaches in the study of archaeobotanical remains: plant macro-remains, pollen, phytoliths, and starch grains in the identification of diet and environmental reconstruction.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Levin, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 126A: Politics of the Past (ANTHRO 126A, ANTHRO 226A)

The past is never dead, William Faulkner once wrote. It's not even past. This seminar explores the contested meanings of history in the political present. It particularly focuses on how archaeological work and heritage becomes entangled in larger questions of identity, belonging, belief, economics, and the stories we tell about ourselves. Students will gain an expansive and in-depth perspective on why humans so value what has come before us, and why making meaning from the past is a process suffused with power.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARCHLGY 127: Introduction to bioarchaeological Method and Theory (ARCHLGY 227)

This course deals with the skeletal biology of past populations, covering both the theoretical approaches and methods used in the study of skeletal and dental remains. Issues surrounding the reconstruction of the individual and population, which include age, sex and other paleodemographic factors, will be explored. The health and disease of teeth and bones, and the biomechanical and chemical analyses of bone will also be explored to illustrate how the variety of methods available to bioarchaeologists can be used to reconstruct past lifeways. While this course will be of primary interest to students interested in skeletal biology and archaeology, it is not exclusive to those pursuing careers in biological anthropology. The emphasis is on critical analysis, research skills, and communication skills that can be useful to students pursuing careers in other sub-disciplines of anthropology, laboratory research, or other lateral health-related fields. Required readings will be selected from current literature, and in some classes there will be practical material/exercises so that students can learn some of these techniques. The class is intended to be an interactive learning process in discussion format, and students are required to take an active part in class along with lectures.
Last offered: Autumn 2012
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