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81 - 90 of 102 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 226: Archaeobotany (ARCHLGY 126)

Archaeobotany, also known as paleoethnobotany, is the study of the interrelationships of plants and humans through the archaeological record. Knowledge and understanding of Archaeobotany sufficient to interpret, evaluate, and understand archaeobotanical data. Dominant approaches in the study of archaeobotanical remains: plant macro-remains, pollen, phytoliths, and starch grains in the identification of diet and environmental reconstruction.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARCHLGY 227: HERITAGE POLITICS (ANTHRO 127D, ARCHLGY 127)

Heritage is a matter of the heart and not the brain, David Lowenthal once said. It does not seek to explore the past, but to domesticate it and enlist it for present causes. From the drafting of the first royal decrees on ancient monuments in the 17th century, political interests have had a hand in deciding which traditions, monuments and sites best represent and best serve the needs of the nation. The sum of these domestication efforts, the laws, institutions and practices established to protect and manage heritage, is what we call heritage governance. In this seminar you will learn about the politics of 21st century heritage governance at national and international level. Students will become familiar with key conventions and learn about the functioning of heritage institutions. We will also examine the hidden practices and current political developments that impact heritage governance: how UNESCO heritage sites become bargaining tools in international relations, how EU heritage policies are negotiated in the corridors of Brussels, and how the current re-nationalization of Western politics can affect what we come to know as our common past.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARCHLGY 232: The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique (ANTHRO 332A, ARCHLGY 132, ARCHLGY 332)

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Last offered: Winter 2012

ARCHLGY 233: EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY

This course is designed for graduate students who are interested in experimental study in archaeology. We will discuss the current issues in the discipline, particularly related to archaeological research on food and foodways. We will conduct experimental study and laboratory analyses to investigate ancient human behavior in food fermentation. The archaeological methods include analyses of use-wear on stone tools and various microbotanical remains (starch, phytoliths, fibers, fungi, etc.) on artifacts.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARCHLGY 234: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 235: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 135, CHINA 175, CHINA 275)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ARCHLGY 237: Political Exhumations. Killing Sites Research in Comparative Perspective (ANTHRO 137D, ARCHLGY 137, REES 237)

The course discusses the politics and practices of exhumation of individual and mass graves. The problem of exhumations will be considered as a distinct socio-political phenomenon characteristic of contemporary times and related to transitional justice. The course will offer analysis of case studies of political exhumations of victims of the Dirty War in Argentina, ethnic cleansing in former Yugoslavia, the Holocaust, communist violence in Poland, the Rwandan genocide, and the Spanish Civil War. The course will make use of new interpretations of genocide studies, research of mass graves, such as environmental and forensic approaches.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Domanska, E. (PI)

ARCHLGY 248: Ceramic Analysis for Archaeologists (ARCHLGY 148)

The analysis and interpretation of ceramic remains allow archaeologists to accomplish varied ends: establish a time scale, document interconnections between different areas, and suggest what activities were carried out at particular sites. The techniques and theories used to bridge the gap between the recovery of ceramics and their interpretation within archaeological contexts is the focus of this seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Womack, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 254: Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment (ANTHRO 154C, ANTHRO 254C, ARCHLGY 154, DLCL 254, REES 254)

Indigenous knowledges have been traditionally treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as mistaken epistemologies, i.e., un-scientific and irrational folklore. However, within the framework of environmental humanities, current interest in non-anthropocentric approaches and epistemic injustice, animism emerged as a critique of modern epistemology and an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as a (potentially) decolonizing and liberating practice. This course may be of interest to anthropology, archaeology and literature students working in the fields of ecocriticism and the environmental humanities/social sciences, students interested in the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral, bio-, eco- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms and non-human agencies. The course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in theory of the humanities and social sciences and simultaneously helping students to develop their individual projects and thesis.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARCHLGY 299: INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEARCH

nnINDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEARCH
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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