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71 - 80 of 102 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 169: Archaeology of Britannia (CLASSICS 169)

Life in the Roman Empire: this course is a broad introduction to the archaeology of one of the best known provinces of the empire.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARCHLGY 173: Heritage Institutions Inside Out: The Power of Bureaucracies

Anyone interested in how objects, places and customs become heritage should be interested in bureaucracies. Given that dealing with bureaucratic procedures often cause something of an allergic reaction among people, heritage researchers included, it is perhaps no wonder that they have long been neglected as acts of heritage-making; considered less attractive research subjects than archaeological field ventures, World Heritage sites and grass root heritage communities. Yet it is precisely in the everyday practices of regional, national and international bureaucracies in the administrative tasks, paper shuffling and decisions taken across shiny tables that much of the power to define, select and configure the values of heritage lie. nThe main task of this course is to introduce bureaucracies as agents in sustaining and producing heritage regimes, and to discuss how to go about the study of such institutions. Drawing on the research of an emergent group of scholars dealing with UNESCO, th more »
Anyone interested in how objects, places and customs become heritage should be interested in bureaucracies. Given that dealing with bureaucratic procedures often cause something of an allergic reaction among people, heritage researchers included, it is perhaps no wonder that they have long been neglected as acts of heritage-making; considered less attractive research subjects than archaeological field ventures, World Heritage sites and grass root heritage communities. Yet it is precisely in the everyday practices of regional, national and international bureaucracies in the administrative tasks, paper shuffling and decisions taken across shiny tables that much of the power to define, select and configure the values of heritage lie. nThe main task of this course is to introduce bureaucracies as agents in sustaining and producing heritage regimes, and to discuss how to go about the study of such institutions. Drawing on the research of an emergent group of scholars dealing with UNESCO, the European Union, international corporations and national governments, the first set of seminars will explore the logics of Western bureaucracy and discuss specific examples relating to heritage. The second set of seminars will discuss some methods and analytical approaches to studying heritage bureaucracies, particularly ethnography and Actor Network Theory. Leaning on contemporary research in political anthropology, the points and pitfalls of document analysis, participant observation and interviewing will be covered, as will the challenges of analyzing such knowledge and turning it into academic text.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARCHLGY 188: Matter and Mattering: Transdisciplinary Thinking about Things (ANTHRO 188, ANTHRO 288, APPPHYS 188)

Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also e more »
Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also examine specific examples such as oil, metal (guns), dams, viruses, electricity, mushrooms; each thing will be explored both in terms of its social and ethical entanglements and in terms of its material properties and affordances. There will also be hands-on encounters with objects in labs and a couple of local field trips. The key question throughout will be `why and how does matter matter in society today?¿
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARCHLGY 190: Archaeology Directed Reading/Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

ARCHLGY 195: Independent Study/Research

Students conducting independent study and or research with archaeology faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

ARCHLGY 199: Honors Independent Study

Independent study with honors faculty adviser.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5-6 | Repeatable for credit

ARCHLGY 200: Archaeology of Technology (ANTHRO 101B, ANTHRO 201B, ARCHLGY 100)

The course is an introduction to the social organization of material production and to the theoretical, ethnographic, and historical frameworks used by archaeologists to link the technologies of the past to salient sociocultural information about the people who employed them. Comparison of metallurgical, ceramic, lithic, and textile industries in different cultural and historical settings will inform critical discussions of how and to what extent analyses of artifacts, workshops, and industrial installations can provide insight into past societies.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ARCHLGY 222: Pottery Analysis for Archaeologists: The Social and Material Dimensions of Ceramic Containers

Due to the dominance of pottery in the archaeological record for the past 10,000 years, its analysis has attracted a great deal of research attention, making it imperative that all archaeologists have at least a working knowledge of ceramics. This course provides classroom and laboratory perspectives for understanding the information about ancient society, economy, and culture that can be plausibly derived from pottery and the visual, structural, and compositional methods that best help obtain that information.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARCHLGY 224: Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual (ARCHLGY 124)

This course explores many aspects of food in human history from an archaeological perspective. We will discuss how the origins of agriculture helped to transform human society; how food and feasting played a prominent role in the emergence of social hierarchies and the development of civilization; and how various foodways influenced particular cultures. We will also conduct experimental studies to understand how certain methods of food procurement, preparation, and consumption can be recovered archaeologically.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ARCHLGY 225: Archaeological Field Survey Methods (ARCHLGY 125, ASNAMST 125A)

Practicum applying a variety of survey techniques to discover, map, and record archaeological sites. Basic cartographic skills for archaeologists and an introduction to GIS tools, GPS instruments, and geophysical techniques. Participants should be able to walk 3 - 4 miles over uneven terrain or make special arrangements with the instructor for transportation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
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